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Full text of "Economic Analysis of Roadway Occupancy For Freeway Pavement Maintenance And Rehabilitation, Volume 2 - User Manual"

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Litifary 



ECONOMIC ANAL>rSIS OF ROAD\A/AY 
OCCUPANCY FOR FREE\A/AY PAVEMENT 
MAINTENANCE AND REHABILITATION 



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Prepared for 

FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION 
Offices of Resrarch & Development 
Washington, D.C. -20590 



This document is available to the 
public through the National Technical 
Information Service, Springfield, 
Virginia -22161 



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NOTICE 



This document is disseminated under the sponsorship of 
the Department of Transportation in the interest of 
information exchange. The United States Government 
assumes no liability for its contents or use thereof. 

The contents of this report reflect the views of Byrd, 
Tallamy, MacDonald and Lewis, which is responsible for 
the facts and the accuracy of the data presented herein. 
The contents do not necessarily reflect the official 
views or policy of the Department of Transportation. 

This report does not constitute a standard, specification, 
or regulation. 



FHWA DISTRIBUTION NOTICE 



Sufficient copies of this report are being distributed 
by FHWA Bulletin to provide a minimum of one copy to 
each regional office, one copy to each division office, 
and one copy to each State highway agency. Direct 
distribution is being made to the division offices. 



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TECHNICAL REPORT STANDARD TITLE PAGE 



1. Report No. 

FHWA-RD-76-15 



1. Government Accession No. 



4> Title and Subtitle 



ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF ROADWAY OCCUPANCY FOR FREEWAY 
PAVEMENT MAINTENANCE AND REHABILITATION 
Vol. 2 Users Manual 



5. Report Date 

October 1974 



7. Author(s) 



B. C. Butler, Jr. 



,8. Performing Organization Report No. 



9. Performing Organization Name and Address 

Byrd, Tall amy, MacDonald and Lewis 

Division of Wilbur Smith and Associates 
2921 Telestar Court 

Falls Church, Virginia 22042 



12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address 

Office of Research and Development 
Federal Highway Administration 
'U. S. Department of Transportation 
Washington, D. C. 20590 



3. Recipient's Catalog No. 



6. Performing Organization Code 



10. Work Unit No. 

FCP-35E1012 



11. Contract or Gront No. 

pOT-FH-11-8132 



13. Type of Report and Period Covered 



User Manual 



14. Sponsoring Agency Code 



15. Supplementary Notes 



FHWA Contract Manager, J. V. Boos (HRS-41) 



16. AbstractA computer program was developed to perform an Economic Analysis of Roadway 
Occupancy for Maintenance and Rehabilitation "EAROMAR." The user specifies the 
pavement design and traffic. The program generates hourly traffic volume by trip 
purpose, direction and year; vehicle operational cost as a function of vehicle 
weight, speed and project design alignment; value of time by trip purpose, income 
level and time loss, and annual workload by activity. The influence of roadway 
occupancy on the motorist is executed hourly for each activity and lane closure. 
The resulting operational, time, accident and pollution impacts are combined for all 
feasible closures including - traffic detours and crossovers. A 10-mile section of 
eight-lane portland cement concrete was analyzed over 20 years. 

This volume is the second of a three volume report. The others in the series are: 



Vol No . 

1 
3 



FHWA No . 

76-14 
76-16 



Short Title 

Final Report 

Program Documentation 



17. Keywords Pavement Design, Highway 
Maintenance, Economics, Vehicle 
Operation Costs, Accident Cost, Value of 
Time, Pollution, Maintenance Models, 
Simulation 



19. Security Classif. (of this report) 

Unclassified 



18, Distribution Statement 



No restri'ctions. This document is avail' 
able to the public through the National 
Technical Information Service, 
Springfield, Virginia 22161 



20. Security Classif. (of this page) 

Unclassified 



21. No. of Pages 

194 



22. Price 



Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-69) 



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ACKNOWLEDGMENT 

The research study covered by this report was conducted by the 
Byrd, Tallatny, MacDonald and Lewis Division of Wilbur Smith and 
Associates. The principal investigator was Bertell C. Butler, Jr. 
Others making contributions to the study included Stephen W. Hopkins 
who assisted in all phases of the study and contributed substantially 
in the development of the computer program; L. G. Byrd, who provided 
guidance in the development of the maintenance module; Robley Winfrey, 
who critiqued the approach to developing vehicle operation cost, 
and made available information on vehicle operating characteristics; 
Ross Maxwell, who directed field data gathering efforts in California, 
and other firm members who gave suggestions and provided assistance 
during the conduct of the research. 

The author wishes to thank the state highway staff members in 
California, Maryland, and Virginia for their cooperation in providing 
notice of maintenance occupancy conditions and data on traffic related 
to roadway occupancy locations. 

Special thanks are extended to Mr. James Boos of the Federal 
Highway Administration who, as project manager, provided invaluable 
assistance in contacts with Federal and State highway staff members. 

Other Federal Highway Administration personnel who made contri- 
butions to the study include Tom Pasko and Dick McComb, Office of 
Research and Development; Ed Evans, Richard Murphy and James Robertshaw, 
Computer Services Division, and Perry Kent, Program Management Division. 



n 



PREFACE 



Report Contents 

"An Economic Analysis of Roadway Occupancy for Freeway Pavement 
Maintenance and Rehabilitation" is contained in three volumes. This 
is the result of work accomplished under a Federally Coordinated Research 
Program, Project 5E, Premium Pavements for "Zero Maintenance," during 
the period of July 1973 to May 1975. 

Volume I, Final Report, provides a complete description of the 
scope, approach, and results of evaluating the economic impact of 
roadway maintenance crew occupancy, taking into account motor vehicle 
operating cost, value of time, accidents, and pollution under various 
freeway traffic conditions. The assessments and conclusions are based 
upon previous state-of-the-art and study of field data. 

Volume II, Users Manual, presents the results of the study as a 
users manual with a systems approach to pavement design, which evaluates 
environmental, operational performance and serviceability factors for 
alternative pavements under a variety of rehabilitation and maintenance 
strategies. The presentation is in two parts: The first is the 
Algebraic Users Manual, for hand computations. The second is the User 
Manual for Program EAROMAR (Economic Analysis for Roadway Occupancy for 
Maintenance and Rehabilitation) which gives a detailed description 
of the format and coding for all required input and a general description 
of the optional input to modify the impacts for local needs. 

Volume III, Program Documentation, contains a complete description 
of the internal variable and computations for the computer program 
EAROMAR, and thus is the basis for any future program modifications. 
The format and coding for all inputs are described in detail. One 
change to the program has been made by FHWA, which is documented in 
this Volume. This modification incorporates an inflation rate of 10 
percent in present worth computations. 

Report Applications 

High traffic volumes, heavy loads, and weathering on existing 
pavement designs cause accelerated damage and early deterioration. 
Maintenance operations required to keep these highway facilities service- 
able create a conflict with the motorist causing delays, and increasing 
pollution and accident opportunities. These repairs are: (1) costly 
due to the extensive traffic control required, (2) limited to between 
peak hour periods to avoid exceeding the traffic volume capacity, and 
(3) difficult to perform and often temporary due to problems in mobilizing 
the work crew. Thus the elimination of these impacts results in reduced 
highway maintenance expenditures and higher levels of safety, economy 
and convenience to the user. 



m 



The FHWA has determined that one solution to the difficulties 
associated with highway maintenance operations is to produce a "pre- 
mium pavement" which reduces maintenance requirements. The savings 
derived from direct maintenance expenditures and motorist costs over 
the life of the pavement could be invested in constructing a "premium 
pavement" as compared to existing designs. 



IV 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT i i 

PREFACE iii 

INTRODUCTION 1 

DEFINITION OF TERMS 5 

ALGEBRAIC USER MANUAL 10 

General Description 11 

General Procedure 13 

Pavement Design Problem 15 

Activity Costs 17 

Nomograph Requirements 17 

Use of Nomograph "DWORK" 20 

Daily Activity Costs 21 

Activity Costs Work Sheet 23 

Motorist Costs 23 

Use of Nomographs "NOC", "TIME", and "ACID" 25 

Use of Nomographs "QUE(l)", "QUE(2)", and "QUE(3)" 29 

Motorist Costs Work Sheet 33 

Total Annual Occupancy Costs 37 

Analysis Period 39 

Summary 47 

USER MANUAL FOR PROGRAM EAROMAR 49 

Introduction 50 

Information Matrices 50 

Maintenance Simulation 52 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont.) 

Page 

Motorist Impact 53 

REQUIRED INPUT 55 

Traf f i c 55 

Volume 55 

AM Peak Split 57 

Commercial Vehicles 57 

Traffic Data Card 58 

Design 58 

Analysis Period 58 

Freeway Type 58 

Pavement Type 60 

Project Length 60 

Pavement Thickness 61 

Design Data Card 61 

Packet Option 61 

OPTIONAL INPUT 65 

Activity Workload 65 

PCC Pavement 68 

Bituminous Pavement 69 

Composite Pavement 69 

Activity Deletion 70 

Activity Workload Factoring 72 

Activity Workload Rate 72 

vi 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont.) 

Workload Spacing 72 

Activity Standards 72 

Resurfacing 74 

Simulation 77 

Worksite Size 80 

Number of Simulations 82 

Worksite Spacing 82 

Simulation Constraints 83 

Travel Time 85 

Maintenance Level 85 

Cure Time 85 

Traffic Control 87 

Zone Length 87 

Occupancy Moves 87 

Traf f i c 88 

Traffic Distribution 88 

Trip Purpose Distribution 94 

Occupancy Constraints 94 

Specification Option 97 

Volume-Capacity Ratio Option 98 

Crew Option 102 

Speed 102 

Freeway Design Speed 104 

vii 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (Cont.) 



Speed Limit 

Capacity 
Shoulders 
Detours 

Distance Between Interchanges 

Detour Length 

Detour Speed Limit 

Detour Volume 

Detour Capacity 

Signal Stops 

Lanes on Detour 
Vehicle Operation Costs 

Roadway Alignment 

Vehicle Class Data 

Unit Costs 
Value of Time 
Accident Cost 
Output 
DEMONSTRATION RUN 
APPENDIX A 



Input and Default Arrays and Scalars for 
the Demonstration Run Using Program EAROMAR 



APPENDIX B - Computer Output for the Demonstration Run 
Using Program EAROMAR 



PMi 
109 

109 
109 
112 
115 
115 
115 
116 
116 
116 
116 
119 
119 
121 
121 
123 
129 
129 
135 

141 

150 



vm 



LIST OF FIGURES 
Number Page 

1 "DWORK" nomograph for the determination of daily 
worksites as a function of worksite time and roadway 
occupancy productive time 18 

2 Sample calculations and procedures using Worksheet 

No. 1 24 

3 "NOC" nomograph for the determination of increased 
vehicle operation costs for a range of occupancy 
intervals, directional volumes and lane closures 26 

4 "TIME" nomograph for the determination of the costs 
of accidents for a range of occupancy intervals, 
direction volume and lane closures 27 

5 "ACID" nomograph for the determination of the costs 
of accidents for a range of occupancy intervals, 
direction volume and lane closures 28 

6 "QUE(l)" nomograph for the determination of increased 
operation costs and time costs during hours of 

queuing when one lane is available to the motorist 30 

7 "QUE (2)" nomograph for the determination of increased 
vehicle operation costs and time costs during hours of 
queuing when two lanes are available to the motorist 31 

8 "QUE(3)" nomograph for the determination of increased 
vehicle operation costs and time costs during hours 
of queuing when three lanes are available to the 
motorist 32 

9 Sample calculations and procedures using Worksheet 

No. 2 35 

10 Sample calculations and procedures using Worksheet 

No. 3 38 

11 Sample calculations and procedures using Worksheet 

No. 2 ' 41 

12 Sample calculations and procedures using Worksheet 

No. 3 43 

13 Sample calculations using Worksheet No. 4 44 



IX 



LIST OF FIGURES (Cont.) 
Number Page 

14 General flow of computer program EAROMAR 51 

15 General flow of portion of subroutine INITAL 
illustrating required and optional input flow 

levels in program EAROMAR 56 

16 The minimum input deck requirement for program 

EAROMAR 64 

17 Schematic of overriding routine OVER used for 

optional inputs 67 

18 Schematic of Packet No. 5 used in the override example 

of workload models 73 

19 Activity standard override packet 76 

20 Packet sets for pavement resurfacing overrides 79 

21 Frequency distribution of the patches computed by the 
program EAROMAR 81 

22 Schematic of example override packet set used in 
program simulation parameters 90 

23 Hourly distributions of traffic by trip purpose 
and direction developed for use as defaults in 

program 91 

24 Hourly traffic distribution override packets 96 

25 Example packet set used in the specification of 
available roadway occupancy time 103 

26 Speed curves for highway designs of 70, 60, and 50 mph 
where speed limit equals design speed 105 

27 Speed curves for a range of speed limits on a road 

with a 70 mph design speed 106 

28 The influence of capacity on a road designed for 

70 mph 107 

29 Packet sets used to control the program speed matrix 111 

30 Schematic of packet No. 5 as used to control shoulders 114 



LIST OF FIGURES (Cont.) 
Number Page 

31 Packet No. 15 used in the specification of detour 
parameters 118 

32 Example packet set used in the establishment of a 
vehicle operating cost array 125 

33 Value of time override packets 128 

34 Override packet No. 20 used for specifying an 

average accident cost 131 

35 Packet No. 10 used in specifying program output 
requirements 134 

36 Design and traffic variables as specified in 
required input and as defined through program 

defaults 142 

37 Roadway occupancy and activity parameters generated 
by program defaults for each activity. The activity 
code number refers to portland cement concrete 
activities 143 

38 Matrix of available roadway occupancy hours by 
activity generated from default descriptions of 

start and finish hour for each activity 144 

39 Program generated speed matrix for 8-1 ane divided 
freeway where columns 1, 2 and 3 mean 1, 2 and 3 lanes 
open to motorist, 4 is the detour and 5 is all freeway 
lanes open 145 

40 Sample of 1000 random full depth and partial depth 
Portland cement concrete patch sizes and random 
locations 146 

41 Matrix of default initial year traffic distributions 

and yearly increments 147 

42 Matrix of hourly operation costs generated by the 
program using defaults for pavement alignment, 

vehicle composition and unit costs 148 

43 Matrix of the value of time generated by the program 149 



XI 



LIST OF TABLES 
Number Page 

1 Maintenance Activity Performance Standard Data 

used as defaults in the program 22 

2 Queuing costs for example conditions illustrated 

in Figure 11 34 

3 Factors to convert total roadway occupancy costs to 
present worth for interest rates 5 percent through 

10 percent 45 

4 Description of the required traffic input on data 

card No. 1 59 

5 Description of required design card on data card 

No. 2 62 

6 Packet option card as used to terminate input data 
stream 63 

7 Option input packets available for program EAROMAR 66 

8 Optional input packet No. 5 used for overriding 
workload models 71 

9 Optional input packet No. 17 used to specify the 
crew cost, material cost, and the production rate 

for activity standards 75 

10 Packet Numbers 14, 16, and 11 used in the control 

of program generated resurfacing cycle 78 

11 Description of optional input packet No. 8 defining 
simulation parameters 84 

12 Description of optional input packet No. 5 used to 
change simulation parameters 86 

13 Description of optional input packet No. 13 used to 
override movement rates between work sites 89 

14 Optional input packet No. 1 used for overriding 

hourly traffic distribution 93 

15 Optional input packet No. 2 used for overriding 

trip purpose distribution 95 



XII 



LIST OF TABLES (Cont.) 
Number Page 

16 Occupancy intervals established through the use 

of Specification Packet No. 4 99 

17 Optional input packet No. 4 used for specifying 
occupancy intervals for activities 100 

18 Optional input packet No. 5 used for specifying 
occupancy constraints 101 

19 Optional input packets No. 18, 19, and 23 used to 
specify capacities, freeway design speed and speed 
limits 108 

20 Interpretation given to the subscripts for 

variables SLIMIT and CAP by the program EAROMAR 110 

21 Optional input packet No. 12 used for specifying 
shoulder constraints 113 

22 Optional input packet No. 15 used for establishing 
detour parameters 117 

23 Optional input packet No. 6 used for specifying 
roadway alignment used in the development of vehicle 
consumption parameters 120 

24 Optional input packet No. 7 used to specify the 
weight, percentage and costs of the vehicles used 

in developing vehicle consumption parameters 122 

25 Optional input packet No. 9 used for specifying unit 

cost for fuel, tires, oil and maintenance 124 

26 Value of time packet 12 and 21 127 

27 Packet No. 20 used to specify the costs of an 

accident 130 

28 Optional input packet No. 10 used for controlling 

the amount of program output 133 

xiii 



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XIV 



INTRODUCTION 

Existing pavement design on freeways is subject to accelerated 
deterioration due to weathering, heavy loads and high traffic volumes. This 
deterioration creates a need for maintenance early in the life of the pavement 
and results in disruption of traffic by maintenance occupancy forces. Such 
maintenance is costly due to the extensive traffic control needed to protect 
both maintenance crews and motorists. Scheduling of these occupancy periods 
must occur during off peak hours to avoid exceeding volume capacity. Also, 
maintenance crew job site movements are hampared by limited access and high 
traffic speeds. Maintenance performed under these conditions must frequently 
be repeated because limited time results in temporary or hasty repairs which 
are costly. These occupancy periods also cause conflicts with the motorist 
and in turn affects motorist operating costs, delays and increases potential 
for accidents. Finally, the general slowing of traffic generates increased 
levels of pollution. The elimination of these costs and impacts can result 
in reduced highway maintenance expenditures and higher levels of safety, 
economy and convenience to the highway user. 

One means of minimizing these difficulties associated with freeway 
maintenance is to produce a pavement, which can be referred to as a "premium 
pavement," requiring less maintenance or no maintenance. This subsequent 
reduction in direct maintenance activities will in turn reduce maintenance 
expenditures, motorist costs, i.e., operation, time, and accidents. These 
savings could justify the increased costs of constructing this, so called, 
"premium pavement." 

1 



The economic analysis of the cost of maintenance, rehabilitation 
and motorist impacts presented in this manual supports the systems 
approach to pavement design. In the systems approach the allocation 
of present and future cash flows are quantified and converted to pres- 
ent worth in evaluating a range of pavement design strategies over a 
pavement's life. 

The economic analysis presented in this manual generates costs, 
delays to drivers and passengers, increased air pollution, potential 
accidents and accident costs related to maintenance operations. 

The manual presents the user with two methods for developing motor- 
ist impacts. The first method presents a step-by-step procedure in 
algebraic nomenclature which draws on tables and graphs. This approach 
provides the user with a quick manual method for estimating the costs 
to motorists resulting from the occupancy of a high volume freeway to 
perform a maintenance or reconstruction activity. The manual approach 
has been kept simple and designed for easy adaption to fit conditions 
which exist at local levels. However, this has required that the analy- 
sis be limited to the evaluation of one activity at a time. 

The graphs and tables developed to support the manual analysis 
were based on a series of assumptions and assigned unit costs for vehicle 
operation, time and accidents that were built into a computer program 
titled "The Economic Analysis of Roadway Occupancy for Maintenance and 
Rehabilitation. Nevertheless, it is believed that the manual analysis 
will prove useful in developing quick estimates of motorist costs. 



The computer program "EAROMAR" can be used where the manual approach 
proves too limiting. This program was designed to be easily adaptable to 
the needs of the 50 State highway departments and other highway agencies. 

The computer program EAROMAR does three things. First, it estab- 
lishes a data matrix of given and assumed information. Second, it 
determines the specific hours the roadway will be occupied by work crews 
annually together with the maintenance and rehabilitation costs asso- 
ciated with that occupancy. Finally, the impact to the motorist caused 
by the roadway occupancy is established in terms of operation costs, 
time costs, accident costs, and pollution effects. 

The user specifies through program inputs the pavement design and 
thickness, freeway lanes and project length together with the initial 
and final year traffic. Based on constraints and assumptions, all 
of which are subject to user modification through optional program input, 
the program generates data arrays holding the following information: 

1. Hourly traffic volume by trip purpose, direction, and year 

2. Vehicle operation costs as a function of vehicle weight, 
speed and project design alignment 

3. Value of time by trip purpose, income level and time loss 

4. Annual workload for a range of work activities associated 
with the pavement design 

5. Work activity production rates and labor, equipment and 
material cost requirements 

6. Available roadway hourly occupancy intervals for each activity 



7. Vehicle speeds as a function of capacity, volume, and speed 
limit 

All of this information is used in a roadway occupancy simulation 
to develop an activity occupancy matrix by lane closure. The occupancy 
matrix is used to analyze the influence of roadway occupancy on the 
motorist. 



Activity 



DEFINITION OF TERMS 

- A specific work function which is per- 
formed on the pavement, i.e., pavement 
patching, resurfacing, joint sealing, etc. 

- The quantifiable units of work generated 
for a work activity, e.g., square yards 

of patching, linear feet of crack sealing, 
lane miles of resurfacing, etc. 

Available Occupancy Hours - The hours of a day when work crews are 

permitted to occupy a roadway. 



Activity Workload 



Closure Category 



- A variety of lane closure sequences can 
be used in the delineation of work zones 
for activity work crews. Each closure 
sequence is defined as a closure category, 
As an example, on an eight-lane freeway, 
the following six sequences of closure 
categories are feasible: 

1. Close one lane at a time 

2. Close two lanes at a time 

3. Close three, then one lane 

4. Close all lanes and use shoulder 

5. Close all lanes and use detour 

6. Close all lanes and cross traffic 
over to opposite lanes 

5 






Directional Lanes 



Influence Zone 



Lane Closure 



Maintenance Level 



TKe number of lanes going in a single 
direction for a given freeway, i.e., 
on an eigfit-lane freeway, there are four 
lanes In one direction. 

The distance over which vehicles are 
operated at an average reduced speed due 
to lane closures on the freeway. 

The number of directional lanes closed 
for a work activity, i.e., lane closure 1 
is one lane closed, lane closure 2 is 
two lanes closed, etc. 

The number of periods in a year when the 
workload generated by a roadway will be 
taken care of. If 100 square yards of 
patching were the annual workload, then 
a maintenance level of one would mean that 
the road was occupied for one period to 
perform the annual work, i.e., work crews 
would be sent to the road eyery day until 
the total workload generated by the road- 
way had been taken care of by the work 
crews. A maintenance level of two would 
mean that at two periods in the year, the 
roadway would be occupied to perform work. 
6 



Maintenance Level 
CCont.) 



Occupancy Interval 



Occupancy Period 



Furtiier, only one~lialf of tlie annual work- 
load would be available during each period. 
Finally, If tfie maintenance level was 
.2, tlxen the road would only be occupied 
every fifth year. The workload generated 
each year would be continually accumulated 
until it could be taken care of in the 
fifth year. 

Any continuous interval of time which is 
less than or equal to 24 hours when the 
roadway can be occupied. As an example, one 
occupancy interval could be a roadway 
occupancy which started at 8 A.M. and was 
terminated at 3 P.M. If crews reoccupied 
the road at 8 P.M. and stayed until 11 P.M., 
that would' be a second occupancy interval. 

A period of time when work crews occupy a 
roadway on a continual basis, i.e., at 
every occupancy interval opportunity. 
Where the maintenance level is greater than 
one, for example 3, the annual workload 
is divided into three parts. It requires 
an occupancy period to complete the work- 
load for each of the three parts. 



Pavement Analysis Age - The models predicting maintenance work- 
load are a function of pavement age. A 
pavement deteriorates due to loadings 
and fails at a rate related to its design 
life. The workload models are based on 
a deterioration of the pavement over 
twenty years. The pavement analysis age 
is created for use in the workload models 
to accommodate axle loads and a design 
life which do not correspond to the 
twenty -year life associated with the 
models. 

Pollution Day - The total emissions of CO and HC generated 

by vehicles operating normally on a free- 
way of a given length during a 24-hour 
period. The increase in emissions 
created during a roadway occupancy are 
converted into pollution days which there- 
fore represent the days of normal opera- 
tion required to generate the increased 
emissions caused by the roadway occupancy. 



simulation Workload 



Worksite 



Work Zone 



The total units of work performed during 
th.e simulation process in subroutine MAINT. 
TPie simulation workload is controlled by tfie 
worksite workload and the number of 
interations specified for the simulation. 

The spot location on the roadway where 
work crews perform productive work. 

The area on a roadway where work crews 
can actually perform work. The length 
of this zone does not include the cone 
taper used to channel traffic. 



ALGEBRAIC USER MANUAL 
to 

Evaluate the 
Economic Impact of 
Occupying a Roadway 

for Maintenance 
and Rehabilitation 



October 1974 
10 



General Description 

In a systems approach to pavement design, the performance of 
alternate pavement systems over their entire lifetime is evaluated. 
Not only are alternate pavement designs evaluated for identified 
environmental and operational factors, but each alternate pavement 
design's predicted performance and serviceability are examined in 
the light of a variety of rehabilitation and maintenance strategies. 

In seeking an optimum pavement system, the designer also should 
address the traffic impacts associated with pavement occupancy by 
maintenance and rehabilitation crews. These traffic impacts can be 
substantial if high traffic volumes are queued during roadway occu- 
pancy. 

The traffic impacts include the delays and inconvenience to 
the motorist, the increased accidents created by ■'iiterfering with 
normal motorist operations and increased pollution levels created 
when traffic slows in the presence of roadway work. Elimination 
of motorist impacts can create warrants for the selection of a 
premium pavement design if such a design can be proved cost 
effective. One way to show cost effectiveness is to place a dollar 
value on the elimination of motorist impacts. This can be done 
for delays through the evaluation of increased vehicle operation 
costs and by placing a value on time losses. A dollar value also 
can be placed on potential accident increases. 



11 



The total dollar savings resulting from the elimination of motor- 
ist costs can be considered as funds available to be spent in the 
elimination of the pavement defects responsible for the generation of 
motorist costs. 

The algebraic analysis is designed to permit an analyst to deter- 
mine the costs associated with performing a work activity on a road- 
way pavement. The total annual costs associated with the activity 
consist of two components which are: 

1. Activity costs 

2. Motorist costs 

The activity costs are the expenditures incurred by work crews 
to perform the work which is generated annually by the pavement. The 
motorist costs include changes in vehicle operation costs, potential 
accident cost increases, and the value of loss time created when work 
crews occupy a roadway to perform work. 

The algebraic analysis provides for the evaluation of one work 
activity at a time. This approach simplifies the analysis but does 
require the user to perform a complete algebraic evaluation for each 
maintenance activity and rehabilitation activity expected to occur 
over the life of a given pavement design. The computational require- 
ments can become substantial when a number of alternate pavement 
systems must be evaluated. However, the computer program EAROMAR is 
available to be used in these situations. There will be times when 
only a single work activity will need to be addressed. As an example, 
a designer may want to know the consequences of eliminating or 

12 



reducing a specific maintenance activity such as blowups, or joint seal- 
ing or pavement patching. If the savings in maintenance and motorist 
costs exceeds the increased construction costs, than an economic warrant 
has been established for the design modification needed to eliminate 
the maintenance. The elimination of a single maintenance activity will 
be used in an example illustrating the implementation of the algebraic 
users analysis. 

General Procedure 

The algebraic analysis is outlined through an example, i.e., a 
pavement design situation is presented and the analysis demonstrated 
using actual numbers in the example. The general steps required to 
develop both the activity and motorist costs includes the following: 

1. The annual lane mile workload for the activity being 
evaluated is established. 

2. A determination is made of the daily hours of roadway 
occupancy required to perform the activity workload. 

3. The annual direct activity costs are computed. 

4. The motorist operation costs, time costs and accident 
costs created because roadway is occupied and normal 
traffic flow is interrupted are determined. 

5. A determination is made of the added motorist operation, 
time, and accident costs created when the roadway 
occupancy creates motorist queues. 



13 



6. The annual activity and motorist costs are converted to present 
worth dollars. 

7. The present worth dollars for the analysis period are accumulated, 
A number of algebraic symbols are used in the illustrated 

analysis. These are alphabetically defined as follows: 

C = The total hours required by a work crew in performing 

an activity during one day. 
CF = Crew fixed roadway occupancy time. This is the sum 

of TC, CT, and NT. 
CN = Productive Interval, the number of hours available for 

productive work during roadway occupancy. 
CT = Cure time in hours following the placement of material 

at the last worksite for a given occupancy interval. 
H = The number of hours required to perform production 

work at a single worksite. 
NT = Nonproductive time in hours during roadway occupancy 

interval which is allowed for lunch or rest breaks. 
P = Activity productivity rate in accomplishment units 

per hour. 
TC = The hours required for a work crew to place an initial 

traffic control installation and to remove the final 

traffic control installation for one roadway occupancy 

interval . 



14 



TT = Work crew travel time allowance in hours for traveling 

from maintenance garage or housing facility to the 

roadway and then to return. 
W = Annual activity workload in accomplishment units per 

lane mile of roadway. 
WS = The average number of workload accomplishment units 

at a single worksite. 

Pavement Design Problem 

You as a design engineer have established that a 4-lane divided, 
9-inch thick reinforced portland cement concrete pavement will satisfy 
the environmental and operational requirements specified for a region 
of your state. However, you are concerned about the performance of the 
concrete joints because similar conventionally-designed pavements have 
had joint failures in the region. Also, you are aware that these fail- 
ures have generated considerable repair expense. You may have available 
to you a joint design which would eliminate the problem. However, based 
on the elimination of repair expenses alone, it may not be possible to 
justify the costs of the joint design. 

Through this analysis you also may consider as part of the joint 
failure costs, the expense incurred by highway motorists when they 
are slowed and inconvenienced during the joint repair process. 

The first step in the analysis is to predict the repair 
requirements created by the joint failure. You probably have some 
idea of the expected magnitude of repair from the history of joint 
repair expenses associated with existing joint failures. For purposes 

15 



of this example, assume that the elimination of joint failures will 
eliminate a full depth concrete patch at 10% of the concrete joints over 
the life of the pavement. Further, assume that the first joint failure 
requiring the placement of a concrete patch occurs when the pavement is 
six years old. Also, assume a constant repair workload each year until 
the pavement's 20th year when it will be rehabilitated or rebuilt. 

These simplifying assumptions produce the following number of 
annual joint repairs '• 

W = Joint failure repairs per lane mile per year 

F = Failure years = 20-6=14 years 

S = Joint spacing = 50 feet (assumed) 

W = ((5280/S)x.lO)/F = ((5280/50)x.l0)/14 

W = .75 joint repairs/lane mile/year 

Next an average size full depth concrete patch must be established 
at each joint failure. For purposes of this -example we will specify 
that each concrete patch will be 22 square yards in size. Therefore, 
starting in the sixth year and continuing eyery year thereafter until 
the 20th year, work crews must be sent to the roadway to make .75 full 
depth concrete patches 22 square yards in size per lane mile of pavement. 

From the problem statement and the assumptions the first requirement 
has been satisfied, that of establishing an annual lane mile workload 



16 



Activity Costs 

The activity costs consist of the crew costs and the materials 
needed to satisfy the activity workload W. Before the crew costs can 
be computed, it is necessary to determine the total crew hours which 
must be invested to complete the annual activity workload. These crew 
hours are divided into three components which are: 

1. Crew travel time 

2. Crew fixed roadway occupancy time 

3. Crew variable roadway occupancy time, "Productive Interval" 
The variable component, the productive interval, represents the 

productive time on the roadway. This includes work at each site, travel 
between worksites and the installation of traffic control when worksites 
are widely spaced. 

A simulation routine in the computer program "EAROMAR" was used to 
establish the nomograph "DWORK" shown in Figure 1. The total number of 
worksites which can be handled by a crew each day is determined using 
this nomograph. 
Nomograph Requirements 

The analyst needs to determine two values to use the nomograph 
"DWORK". These are: 

1. Hours per worksite (H) 

2. Productive interval (CN) 



17 



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The hours per worksite depend on the average workload existing at 
each worksite (WS) and the production rate of the crew (P). If the 
average concrete patch is 22 square yards in size and the work crew can 
produce 11 square yards of full depth concrete repair per hour, then 
the hours per worksite becomes 2 hours. 

H = WS/P 

H = 22/11 = 2 hours 
Also, note that the worksite size can be based on closing more than one 
lane. If two lanes were closed and the worksite (WS) increased to 44 SY, 
then it would be necessary to spend 4 hours at each worksite. 

H = WS/P 

H = 44/11 = 4 hours 
The productive interval (CN) is that net time on the roadway avail- 
able for work. This time may be controlled by either the net crew hours 
available or constrained by policy on available hours that the road can 
be occupied. 

The net crew hours CN value is determined by subtracting from the 
total crew work hours (C), the values established for CT and CF. 

CN = C - CT - CF 
The hours when the roadway is available to be occupied by work crews 
may be set as a matter of policy. The queue nomographs illustrated in 
Figures 6 through 8 may provide the analyst with insight in selecting a 
reasonable occupancy interval for a given traffic flow condition. 

If the hours available to occupy the roadway are from 9 A.M. to 
4 P.M., this is 7 hours. The crew hours available for productive work 



19 



during roadway occupancy based on this occupancy constraint would be 
CN = 7 - CF 
The lesser value of CN produced by these two approaches should be 
used with the nomograph. 

Use of Nomograph "DWORK" 

The use of the nomograph as illustrated is based on the following 
assumptions: 

Hours per worksite (H) = 2 hours 

C = 8 hours 

CT = 1 hour 

CF = 1 hour 

Productive Interval (CN) = C - CT - CF 

CN = 8-1-1=6 hours 
The steps required to use the nomograph are as follows: 

1. A line is drawn between the point P and the productive interval 
(CN) value of 6 hours on scale B. This establishes a point on 
the line X-X. 

2. A line is drawn between the value 2 on Scale A, the hours per 
worksite, through the established point on the line X-X to the 
tieline. 

3. From the point on the tieline, a line is drawn through the 
available occupancy interval of 6 hours on scale C to the 
predicted worksites per day on scale D which is 2.5 worksite 
locations per day. 



20 



The relationships depicted by the nomograph were based on a simu- 
lation using random size worksites and random worksite spacing. There- 
fore, the uneven number 2.5 for worksites is an acceptable solution. 
The 2.5 worksites can be interpreted as working at two worksites one 
day and then three worksites on the next day. 

Daily Activity Costs 

The costs associated with the performance of an activity are based 
on the hourly crew costs and activity material costs. Typical crew 
costs are illustrated in Table 1 for a range of maintenance activities. 
Also shown in the table for each activity is an estimate of material 
costs for a workload unit. For the activity, full depth concrete 
pavement patching, an hourly crew costs of $48.40 per hour is shown 
for labor and equipment. The material costs is shown as $6.25 per 
square yard. To compute the daily costs of performing concrete patch- 
ing, the daily crew hours and total daily work accomplishment units 
must be established. The daily crew hours (C) is computed as follows: 

C = CN + CF + CT 

C = 6+1+1=8 hours 
The average worksite size was set at 22 square yards and the 
average number of daily worksites was determined as 2.5 from nomograph 
"DWORK". Therefore, the daily work accomplishment units become 55 square 
yards. 

2.5 X 22 = 55 S.Y. 



21 



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Multiplying and summing the crew hours and material accomplishment 
units by $48.40 and $6.25 respectively produces a daily crew costs 
of $722.95. 

(8 X 48.40 + 55 X 6.25) = $722.95 

Activity Costs Work Sheet 

The step-by-step procedure required in the development of the 
annual costs to perform an activity on a pavement is summarized in 
worksheet No. 1 shown in Figure 2. Also shown is the computation 
of the occupancy interval needed in developing motorist cost. 

The worksheet is divided into sections. First values are 
assigned to certain variables. Then use is made of nomograph "DWORK" 
to establish worksites per day. Next a series of computation steps 
are shown to produce daily activity costs and the roadway occupancy 
interval . 

Motorist Costs 

The computation of the daily motorist costs, created when the 
roadway is occupied for work, is divided into two steps. First, the 
operation costs, time costs, and accident costs associated with 
motorist operation in a traffic control zone are determined. Second, 
the increased costs for vehicle operation and time losses are estab- 
lished for hours when traffic is queued. 

The computer program EAROMAR was iterated through a range of 
occupancy intervals, lane closures and traffic volumes to generate 
costs data. This data was used to create a series of motorist costs 



23 



WORKSHEET NO. 1 
DAILY ACTIVITY COSTS 



Activity: Full Depth PCC Patching Analysis Year 6_ 



Step No. Assign Values to: 

1 Production rate in workload units per hour(P) n_ 

2 Average number of workload units per works ite(WS) 22 

3 Crew travel time(TT) 1.0 hour 



4 Crew fixed time(CF) 1.0 hour 



5 Crew productive interval (CN) 6.0 hours 

6 Crew hourly rate $48.40 



7 Material unit costs $ 6.25 



Compute and obtain from Nomograph: (Figure 1) 

8 Worksite time (2) ^ (D = 22 v 11 = 2 hours 

9 Worksites per day (8,5) = 2.5 



Compute as indicated: 

10 Daily crew time(C) (3)+(4)+(5) = 1.0+1.0+6.0 = 8.0 hrs. 

11 Daily material costs (7)x(2)x(9) = 6.25x22x2.5 = $343.75 

12 Daily crew costs (6)x(10) = 48.40x8 = $379.20 

13 Daily activity costs (11)+(12) = 343.75+379.20 = $722.95 

Establish for use in motorist costs computation: 

14 Occupancy interval (4)+(5) = 1.0+6.0 = 7.0 hrs. 



Figure 2. Sample calculations and procedures using 
Worksheet No. 1 

24 



nomographs. The above two steps make use of these nomographs to produce 
motorist costs. 

Use of nomographs "NOC", "TIME", and "ACID" 

These nomographs were developed for use in determining operation, 
time, and accident costs for unqueued conditions during roadway occupancy. 
They are based on the program EAROMAR and reflect the program default 
assumptions together with an assumed influence zone length equal to 
0.5 miles. The nomographs are shown in Figures 3 through 5. 

The use of the nomograph "NOC" as shown in Figure 3 is demonstrated 
for the following values: 

Roadway Occupancy Start Time = 9 
Roadway Occupancy Finish Time = 16 
Directional ADT volume = 30,000 
Using the specified values, the following steps are needed: 

1. A line is drawn from the value 9 on the starting time scale A 
through the value 16 on the finish time scale B to the tie line. 

2. From the tie line, a line is drawn through the directional ADT 
volume of 30,000 to intersect scale C. 

3. Finally, a horizontal line is drawn through the intercept point 
on scale C through scales D and E. 

Depending on the lanes available to the motorist, the operation costs can 
be read directly from either scale C, D, or E. The increased operation 
cost in Figure 3 would be approximately $220, $240, and $260 for 3-, 2-, 
and 1-1 ane operations respectively. The nomographs "TIME" and "ACID" 



25 





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<CM- 


o 


= O 


•r" 




4-> 


* to 


O 


IT) 4J 


QJ 


«/) 


i~ 


O 


•t— 


<U O 


-a 


i- 




3 




a> 





3HU laViS ADNWdriDOO XVMQVOa 



28 



are used in exactly the same way to produce time costs and increased 
accident costs for periods of roadway occupancy. 

Use of nomographs "QUE(l)", "QUE(2)", and "QUE(3)" 

These nomographs were developed to handle queue situations. A 
typical hourly distribution of traffic is included as part of each 
nomograph and reflects the percentage of the directional average daily 
traffic volume occurring in each hour. Only the hours having volumes 
which exceed a capacity of 2000 vehicles per lane are evaluated for 
queues. The nomographs are shown in Figures 6 through 8. 

The identification of the hours which are evaluated for queuing 
is demonstrated for a directional average daily traffic of 30,000 
in Figure 6 where one lane is open to the motorist. The steps 
required to use the nomograph are as follows: 

1. A line is drawn from point A on the percentage scale to 
30,000 on the directional traffic scale to create a point 
on the X-X line. 

2. A line is drawn from point B through the point created on 
the X-X line to an intercepting point on the percentage 
scale. 

3. A horizontal line is drawn through the interception point 
created on the percentage scale. 

Every "hour of the day" bar which is crossed by the horizontal 
line is a queue hour for the 30,000 directional volume. The operation 
costs and value time losses must be determined separately for each 



29 




2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
HOUR OF THE DAY 



60000-1- 



-100 



— 150 



— 200 



— 350 -;; 



-400 S 



-100 

200 
-400 
600 



-250 



-300 



3000 



■4000 



— 5000 



-500 



— 600 



— 700 



— 800 



— 900 



1—1000 



1 000 



2000 



-10000 



—15000 



-20000 



1—25000 



Figure 6. "QUE(l)" nomograph for the determination of 
increased operation costs and time costs during 
hours of queuing when one lane is available to 
the motorist 



30 




I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
HOUR OF THE DAY 



40 0006 


)-B 








r ° 








-200 
















-200 


_45000- 






_ 


~ 




jin 


- 




-300 


— 


-1000 


55000- 


- 




- 




-2000 








— 400 




— 


60000- 


- 




- 




-5000 




iij 




— 500 








z 










65000- 


-3 
























O 












o 




-600 






70000- 


il 








— 10000 




u. 
< 


"S 










_^ 


o 


— 700 


^-. 




75000- 






il 

o 






V. 




_ 












o 




80 000- 


< 




-800 


-15 000 




llj 


(/> 


_ 


(A 






s 


O 




UJ 






o 


— 900 


<n 






oc 










85 000- 


_llJ 

> 


o 


- 


o 

-I 


—20000 




_l 


5 


-1000 


UJ 

Z 




90 000- 


.< 

z 
o 


UJ 




1- 






ft 


-1100 






_ 


^ 








-25 000 




o 










95 000- 


- UJ 
IT 




-1200 








O 




- 






100 ooo' 


- 




— 1300 




-30 000 








-1400 






105000- 


- 




-1500 




— 35000 








—1600 






1 10 000- 


- 




- 




— 40000 








-1700 






115 000- 


- 




—1800 




— 45 000 








— 1900 






120 000- 






—2000 




— 50 000 



Figure 7. "QUE(2)" nomograph for the determination of 
increased vehicle operation costs and costs during 
hours of queuing when two lanes are available to 
the motorist 



31 



i 



A^ 



V 



B OOOO (?) B 



70 000- - 



80 000 



90000-- 



100 000-1- o 
> 



II0 000-- 



120 000- - 



l30 000--< 



I40 000-- 



150000- 



160 000- - 



I70 000-- 



180 000-1- 



2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 II 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
HOUR OF THE DAY 



r- 



-300 

— 400 

-500 

-600 
-700 
-800 
-900 
-1000 
-1100 
-1200 3 

-1400 

-1600 



— 1000 



-5000 



— 10 000 



— 15 000 



—20 000 



-25 000 



-30 000 





— 35 000 


1800 


— 40000 


2000 


-45 000 


2200 


— 50 000 




-55 000 


2400 






— 60 000 


2600 


—65 000 


2800 


— 70 000 


3000 


— 75 000 



Figure 8. "QUE(3)" nomograph for the determination of 
increased vehicle operation costs and time costs 
during hours of queuing when three lanes are 
available to the motorist 



32 



queued hour. In the example illustrated in Figure 6, the hours 17 
through 21 are all queued. To determine the costs associated with 
the queued hours, the following additional steps are needed: 

4. Draw a horizontal line from the top of each queued hourly 
bar to the percentage scale. 

5. From each point created on the percentage scale for a queue 
bar, draw a line through the point created on the X-X line 
to an intercepting point on the directional average hourly 
traffic scale B. 

6. For each intercepting point on the directional average daily 
traffic volume scale, draw a horizontal line through the 
operation costs and value of time losses scales. 

The queue costs associated with each of the queue hours 17 through 
21 as taken from the nomograph are tabulated in Table 2. Of course, 
these queued costs would only be determined if the actual roadway 
occupancy included the queue hours 17 through 21. The impact of the 
queuing in terms of increased costs to the motorist for operation costs 
is $778, for loss time is $4250, and the total is $5028. 

Motorist Costs Worksheet 

Worksheet No. 2, shown in Figure 9 was developed to summarize 

the steps required in using the motorist nomographs included in 
Figures 3 through 8. The occupancy interval is obtained from 
Worksheet No. 1. It is entered as 7 hours for step 1 on the work- 
sheet. This means that any continuous time interval equal to 7 hours 
can be selected for roadway occupancy. The interval selected for 

33 



Table 2. Queuing costs for example conditions 
illustrated in Figure U 



Value of 
Hour Operation Cost Time Losses 

17 $187 $1000 

18 215 2300 

19 120 150 

20 171 800 

21 '' 85 

Total $778 $4250 

Combined Total: $4250 + $778 = $5028 



34 



WORKSHEET NO. 2 
DAILY MOTORIST COSTS 

Activity: Full Depth PCC patching Analysis Year_ 

Step No. Obtain from Worksheet No. 1: 

1 Occupancy Interval No. 1 (14) = 7 hours 

Assign Values to: 

2 Directional traffic volume 30,000 

3 Lanes open to motorist 1 



4 Start hour of occupancy interval 



5 Finish hour of occupancy interval 16_ 



Obtain -From Nomographs: (Figures 6 through 11) 

6 Daily operation costs increase "NOC" (4,5.2,3) = $260 

7 Daily value of time losses "TIME" (4.5,2,3,) = $200 

8 Daily accident losses "ACID" (4,5,2) = $25 

9 Queue hours operation cost "QLIE(Step 3)" (4,5,2) = 

10 Queue hours value of time lost "QUE(Step 3)" (4,5,2) = 

Compute as indicated: 

11 Non-queue motorist cost (6)+(7)+(8) = 260+200+25 = $485 

12 Queue motorist cost (9) + (10) = 0+0 = 

13 Total Daily Motorist Cost (11) + (12) = 485+0 = $485 



Figure 9. Sample calculations and procedures using 
Worksheet No. 2 



35 



the example is shown in steps 4 and 5. This is 9 A.M. to 4 P.M. or 
9 to 16 hundred hours which corresponds to the hour of day scales 
shown on the nomographs. The directional average daily traffic 
volume selected for the 6th year was 30,000. The worksite size is 
based on closing one lane to traffic. With a 4-lane divided road- 
way only one directional lane can be open to traffic and this is 
shown in step 3. 

In step 6, the increase in daily operation costs is established. 
The notation (4,5,2,3) indicates that the nomograph is entered with 
the value given in step 4, which is the start hour of 9 A.M. Next 
and sequentially, the step 5, step 2 and step 3 values of 16, 30,000 
and 1 are used with the nomograph "NOC" to obtain $260. This is the 
increased daily operation costs associated with roadway occupancy 
between 9 A.M. and 4 P.M. in the traffic control zone. A similar 
use of nomographs "TIME" and "ACID' produces the lost time costs of 
$200 and the increased accident costs of $25 shown for steps 7 and 8 
on Worksheet No. 2. 

As indicated in the description of using the "QUE" nomographs, 
the hours when traffic is queued are first established. Because the 
roadway occupancy is terminated at the 16th hour, no traffic queue is 
created. In the example, therefore, no queue costs for vehicle operation 
or time losses are applicable in steps 9 and 10. The notation 
QUE (Step 3) means that the lanes open to traffic in step 3 are used to 
designate the applicable queue nomograph. In the example this is 
QUE(l). 

36 



Total Annual Occupancy Costs 

Once a daily activity costs has been determined using Worksheet 
No. 1 and a daily motorists cost established using Worksheet No. 2, 
they are combined. Next they are expanded for the total annual work- 
load on the roadway. The steps required to accomplish these computa- 
tions are shown on Worksheet No. 3 which is designated Figure 10. 

On Worksheet No. 3, the information required from Worksheets No. 
1 and 2 are designated by No. 1 or No. 2 and the number in parenthesis 
refers to the step in the referenced worksheet. At step 1 on Worksheet 
No. 3, worksites per day are required. The designation No. 1 (9) means 
Worksheet No. 1, step 9. This is 2.5 sites per day. Also needed from 
Worksheet No. 1 were steps 2 and 3 which are a 22 S.Y. average worksite 
size and a $722.95 activity cost per lane mile. The motorist costs 
associated with the activity is obtained from Worksheet No. 2 and is 
$485.00 per lane mile. 

Steps 5, 6, and 7 are assigned. The annual workload was estab- 
lished to be 16.5 square yards of full depth concrete patching per 
lane mile. Only one lane is closed so the workload for item 5 remains 
16.5 S.Y. /mile. 

In the example, one lane is closed and a 4-1 ane divided highway 
was designated so there will be 4 lane closed groups. This is indi- 
cated at step 6. The project length is made one mile for the example. 
This is sufficient for analysis purposes. 

It should be noted that the analysis as outlined is based on a 
single lane closure sequence, i.e., close one lane at a time. This 

37 



WORKSHEET NO. 3 
ANNUAL OCCUPANCY COSTS 



Activity: Full Depth PCC patching Analysis Year_ 

Step No. Obtain from worksheets 1 and 2: ■ 

1 Worksites per day No. 1(9) = 2.5 



2 Average number of workload units per worksite No.l(2)=22 SY 

3 Daily activity costs No. 1(13) = $722.95 . 

4 Daily motorist cost No. 2(13) = $485.00 

Assign Values to: 

5 Annual workload for closed lanes/mile 16.5 SY 

6 Lane closed groups 4 



7 Project Length 1 Mile 



Compute as indicated: 

8 Annual worksites (5)x(6)x(7) v (2) = 16.5x4x1 ^ 22 = 3 

9 Work days (8) ^ (D = 3 v 2.5 = 1.2 

10 Annual activity cost (9)x(3) = 1.2x722.95 = $867.54 

11 Annual motorist cost (9)x(4) = 1.2x485.00 = $582.00 

12 Total cost (10) + (11) = 867.54 + 582.00 = $1449.54 



Figure 10. Sample calculations and procedures using 
Worksheet No. 3 



38 



is consistent with the worksite size assumption used in developing 
worksites per day. If a combination of lane closures is desired, e.g., 
one lane closed, then two lanes closed, then the analyst should make 
an analysis for both conditions and establish an appropriate worksite 
workload for each closure. 

The annual workload per mile shown in Worksheet No. 3 is for one 
lane closed. If the example were an eight-lane freeway and two lanes 
were closed at a time for maintenance, then the workload would be 
for two lane miles. This means that the lane closed group for the 
eight-lane freeway would be 4 groups. 

The final steps in determining a total annual costs for the 
activity are computed in steps 8 through 12. The annual worksites 
are established for the entire one mile long, four-lane wide roadway 
in step 8. Dividing these annual worksites by worksites per day 
produces work days which are used in steps 10 and 11 to produce 
annual activity cost and motorist costs respectively. These are 
totaled in step 12, producing a total cost of $1449.54 for full 
depth concrete patching for the 6th year. 

Analysis Period 

The analysis outlined shows the evaluation of full depth concrete 
patching during one year. To develop a total economic analysis of the 
impact of this maintenance activity over the life of a pavement, it is 
necessary that the operation and motorist costs for the activity be 
totaled and discounted for each analysis year. This is done in the 
following manner where: 

39 



« 



Ay = Total activity and motorist costs for full depth 

concrete patching in year y 
i = Interest rate of money 
n = Analysis period in years 
CA = Total activity and motorist costs for full depth 

concrete patching during n years of pavement service 

CA^ = 2 (Ay/(1 + i)^) 

y=i 

In the example, the total activity and motorist costs need to be 
established for the 6th year through the 20th year. Because the assump- 
tion was made that the workload remains constant over this period, the 
activity costs each year will remain constant, i.e., every year $867.54 
will be expended for full depth concrete patching on the one-mile long, 
4-1 ane divided example pavement section. 

The motorist costs will change each year if the traffic volume 
changes. Normally, volumes increase with time so an annual increase 
should be expected for the motorist costs. If every assumption except 
volume is held constant and the nomographs "NOC", "TIME", and "ACID" 
are used to evaluate a 40,000 directional volume, the values shown on 
Worksheet No. 2, Figure 11 would result. The queue costs shown on 
the Worksheet results from a queue being created in the 16th hour. To 
further simplify the example, it will be assumed that traffic volumes 
increase from the 30,000 level in the 6th year to a 40,000 level in the 
20th year in a way that motorist costs increase linearly each year. 
Based on these assumptions, the motorist costs are estimated for 

40 



WORKSHEET NO. 2 
DAILY MOTORIST COSTS 



Activity: Full Depth PCC Patching Analysis Year 20_ 

Step No. Obtain from Worksheet No. 1: 

1 Occupancy Interval No. 1(14) = 7 hours 

Assign Values to: 

2 Directional traffic volume 40,000 

3 Lanes open to motorist 1 



4 Start hour of occupancy interval 



5 Finish hour of occupancy interval 16 



Obtain from Nomographs: (Figures 6 through 11) 

6 Daily operation costs increase "NOC" (4,5.2,3) = $370 

7 Daily value of time losses "TIME" (4,5,2,3) = $270 

8 Daily accident losses "ACID" (4,5,2) = $35 

9 Queue hours operation cost "QUE(Step 3)" (4,5,2) = $112 

10 Queue hours value of time lost "QUE(Step 3)" (4.5,2) = $110 

Compute as indicated: 

11 Non-queue total motorist cost (6)+(7)+(8) = 370+270+35 = $675 

12 Queue motorist cost (9)+(10) = 112+110 = $222 

13 Total Daily Motorist Cost (11)+(12) = 675+222 = $897 



Figure 11. Sample calculations and procedures using 
Worksheet No. 2 



41 



each year. Motorist costs are shown with the activity costs in Figure 12 
where Worksheet No. 3 is presented for year 20. Worksheet No. 4 as 
shown in Figure 13 was developed to facilitate the analyst in developing 
a present worth cost for an activity for the analysis period. 

A series of present worth factors have been developed for a range 
of interest rates and are shown in Table 3. These are used in con- 
verting each year's total activity cost to a present worth cost on 
Worksheet No. 4. 

The total costs of repairing concrete joint failures with full 
depth concrete patches over a 20-year period is shown to be $9353 in 
present worth dollars. This is the money available to be spent for a 
new joint design. 

One way to evaluate the alternate joint design is in terms of 
available money per linear foot of joint. There are 5068.8 linear feet 
of joints and therefore $1.84 per linear foot of joint created by joint 
failures. 

(5280/50) X 48 = 5068.8 
$9353/5068.8 = $1.84 
This is money available above normal joint costs that can be justified 
economically for an improved joint design. 

Another approach would be to compare the increased money available 
per square yard of pavement. Assume that the inplace costs of the con- 
ventional 9" reinforced portland cement concrete pavement is $10.00 
per square yard. This could be increased to $10.44 per square yard for 
the new joint design as shown in the following computations: 

42 



WORKSHEET NO. 3 
ANNUAL OCCUPANCY COSTS 



Activity: Full Depth PCC Patching Analysis Yea r 20 

Step No. Obtain from worksheets 1 and 2: 

1 Worksites per day No. 1(9) = 2.5 

2 Average number of workload units per worksite No. 1(2)=22 SY 

3 Daily activity costs No. 1(13) = $722.95 

4 Daily motorist cost No. 2(13) = $897.00 

Assign Values to: 

5 Annual workload for closed lanes/miles 16.5 

6 Lane closed groups 4 



Project length 1 



Compute as indicated: 

8 Annual worksites (5)x(6)x(7) v (2) = 16.5x4x1 ^ 22 = 3 

9 Work days (8) ^ (1) = 3 ^ 2.5 = 1.2 

10 Annual activity cost (9)x(3) = 1.2x722.95 = $867.54 

11 Annual motorist cost (9)x(4) = 1.2x897.00 = $976.40 

12 Total cost (10) + (11) = 867.54 + 976.40 = $1843.94 



Figure 12. Sample calculations and procedures using 
Worksheet No. 3 



43 







WORKSHEET NO. 4 
ANALYSIS PERIOD COSTS 






Activi 


ity: Full Depth PCC Patching 




Analysis 


Period 20 Yrs, 


Year 


Activity ^ Motorist 
Costs Costs 


Total ^■ 
Cost ^ 


Discount 
Factor 


_ Present 
" Worth Cost 


1 


- 


- 


- 


.93 


- 


2 


- ■ 


- 


- 


.86 


- 


3 


- 


- 




.79 


- 


4 


- 


- 


- 


.74 


- 


5 


- 


- 


- 


.68 


- 


6 


868 


582 


1450 


.63 


914 


7 


868 


610 


1478 


.58 


857 


8 


868 


638 


1506 


.54 


813 


9 


868 


666 


1534 


.50 


767 


10 


868 


694 


1562 


.46 


719 


11 


868 


722 


1590 


.43 


684 


12 


868 


750 


1618 


.40 


647 


13 


868 


778 


1646 


.37 


609 


14 


868 


807 


1675 


.34 

/ 
1 


570 


15 


868 


835 


1703 


^'.32 


545 


16 


868 


863 


1731 


.29 


502 


17 


868 


891 


1759 


.27 


475 


18 


868 


919 


1787 


.25 


447 


19 


868 


947 


1815 


.23 


417 


20 


868 


976 


1844 


.21 
TOTAL 


387 
9353 



Figure 13. Sample calculations using 
Worksheet No. 4 



44 



Table 3. Factors to convert total roadway occupancy 

costs to present worth for interest rates 

5 percent through 10 percent 



INTEREST RATE (PERCENT) 



YEAR 


5.0 


5.5 


6.0 


6.5 


7.0 


7.5 


8.0 


8.5 


9.0 


9.5 


10.0 


1 


.95 


.95 


.94 


.94 


.93 


.93 


.93 


.92 


.92 


.91 


.91 


2 


.91 


.90 


.89 


.88 


.87 


.87 


.86 


.85 


.84 


.83 


.83 


3 


.86 


.85 


.84 


.83 


.82 


.80 


.79 


.78 


.77 


.76 


.75 


i+ 


.82 


.81 


.79 


.78 


.76 


.75 


.74 


.72 


.71 


.70 


.68 


5 


.78 


.77 


.75 


.73 


.71 


.70 


.68 


.67 


.65 


.64 


.62 


6 


..75 


.73 


.70 


.69 


.67 


.65 


.63 


.61 


.60 


.58 


.56 


7 


.71 


.69 


.67 


.64 


.62 


.60 


.58 


.56 


.55 


.53 


.51 


8 


.68 


.65 


.63 


.60 


.58 


.56 


.54 


.52 


.50 


.48 


.47 


9 


.64 


.62 


.59 


.57 


.54 


.52 


.50 


.48 


.46 


.44 


.42 


10 


.61 


.59 


.56 


.53 


.51 


.49 


.46 


.44 


.42 


.40 


.39 


11 


.58 


.55 


.53 


.50 


.48 


.45 


.43 


.41 


.39 


.37 


.35 


12 


.56 


.53 


.50 


.47 


.44 


.42 


.40 


.38 


.36 


.34 


.32 


13 


.53 


.50 


.47 


.44 


.41 


.39 


.37 


.35 


.33 


.31 


.29 


14 


.51 


.47 


.44 


.41 


.39 


.36 


.34 


.32 


.30 


.28 


.26 


15 


.48 


.45 


.42 


.39 


.36 


.34 


.32 


.29 


.27 


.26 


.24 


16 


.46 


.42 


.39 


.37 


.34 


.31 


.29 


.27 


.25 


.23 


.22 


17 


.44 


.40 


.37 


.34 


.32 


.29 


.27 


.25 


.23 


.21 


.20 


18 


.42 


.38 


.35 


.32 


.30 


.27 


.25 


.23 


.21 


.20 


.18 


19 


.40 


.36 


.33 


.30 


.28 


.25 


.23 


.21 


.19 


.18 


.16 


20 


.38 


.34 


.31 


.28 


.26 


.24 


.21 


.20 


.18 


.16 


.15 


21 


.36 


.32 


.29 


.27 


.24 


.22 


.20 


.18 


.16 


.15 


.14 


22 


.34 


.31 


.28 


.25 


.23 


.20 


.18 


.17 


.15 


.14 


.12 


23 


.33 


.29 


.26 


.23 


.21 


.19 


.17 


.15 


.14 


.12 


.11 


2k 


.31 


.28 


.25 


.22 


.20 


.18 


.16 


.14 


.13 


.11 


.10 


25 


.30 


.26 


.23 


.21 


.18 


.16 


.15 


.13 


.12 


.10 


.09 


26 


.28 


.25 


.22 


.19 


.17 


.15 


.14 


.12 


.11 


.09 


.08 


27 


.27 


.24 


.21 


.18 


.16 


.14 


.13 


.11 


.10 


.09 


.08 


28 


.26 


.22 


.20 


.17 


.15 


.13 


.12 


.10 


.09 


.08 


.07 


29 


.24 


.21 


.18 


.16 


.14 


.12 


.11 


.09 


.08 


.07 


.06 


30 


.23 


.20 


.17 


.15 


.13 


.11 


.10 


.09 


.08 


.07 


.06 


31 


.22 


.19 


.16 


.14 


.12 


.11 


.09 


.08 


.07 


.06 


.05 


32 


.21 


.18 


.15 


.13 


.11 


.10 


.09 


.07 


.06 


.05 


.05 


33 


. .20 


.17 


.15 


.13 


.11 


.09 


.08 


.07 


.06 


.05 


.04 


34 


.19 


.16 


.14 


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35 


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36 


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37 


.16 


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38 


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39 


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45 



Pavement area = 1760 x 12 = 21120 S.Y. 

Available money = $7965/21120 = $0.44/S.Y. 

Pavement cost = $10.00 + .44 = $10.44 
This represents a 4.4% increase which can be allowed for a pavement 
design including the modified joint. 



46 



Summary 

The algebraic users analysis has been illustrated for a single main- 
tenance activity. The analysis showed that $9353 could be saved over 
the life of a 4-1 ane one-mile section of Portland cement concrete pave- 
ment if joint failures requiring concrete repairs could be eliminated. 
It is possible that other maintenance requirements also could be reduced 
or eliminated with an improved joint design, e.g., pavement blowups and 
joint sealing. A similar analysis consisting of the following steps 
will be required for each activity: 

1. The annual lane mile workload for each work activity is 
established. 

2. Worksheet No. 1 is used to compute daily activity costs and 
roadway occupancy interval. 

3. Worksheet No. 2 is used to compute daily motorist costs for 
the activity. 

4. Worksheet No. 3 is used to compute the total activity and motorist 
costs for an analysis year. 

5. Worksheet No. 4 is used to develop a present worth activity 
costs for an analysis period. 

To develop a total economic analysis of the impact of eliminating 
maintenance, the present worth costs for all pavement activities must be 
totaled for an analysis period. 

In algebraic terms, the economic analysis of roadway occupancy for 
maintenance and rehabilitation can be summarized as follows: 



47 



A. = Annual Costs to perform activity i in year y 
M. = Annual Motorist costs associated with the 

performance of activity i in year y 
1 = Interest rate of money 
n = Analysis period 
m = Number of activities applicable to the pavement 

being evaluated 
ROC = Roadway occupancy costs for all pavement 

activities over the analysis period 

y=n i=m 
ROC = E ( E ((A + M )/(! + i)^)) 
y=l i=l ^^ ^^ 



48 



USER MANUAL 

FOR 

PROGRAM EAROMAR 



An Economic Analysis of 
Roadway Occupancy for 
Maintenance and 
Rehabilitation 



October 1974 
49 



Introduction 

The computer program developed for the Economic Analysis of Road- 
way Occupancy for Maintenance and Rehabilitation is referred to as 
"EAROMAR." The program's general structure is shown in Figure 14. In 
the broadest sense, the program does three things. First, it estab- 
lishes a data matrix of given and assumed information. . Second, it deter- 
mines the specific hours the roadway will be occupied by work crews 
annually together with the maintenance and rehabilitation cost associa- 
ted with that occupancy. Finally, the impact to the motorist caused 
by the roadway occupancy is established in terms of operation costs, 
time costs, accident cost and pollution effects. 

Information Matrices 

The data used in the program is created in the two subroutines INITAL 
and OPPARA. These two subroutines each contain a number of routines 
which were originally designed as subroutines but combined to affect a 
balance between the core requirement and run time necessary to execute 
the program. The program will run on any system configuration support- 
ing 92K of available program storage. 

The input data required to execute the program is yery nominal and 
consists of pavement design and traffic volume data. This insures that 
the program can be easily used by State agencies. 

The majority of the data matrices are based on defaults which are 
built into the program. However, each default can be optionally over- 
ridden by the program user. This is accomplished through the use of 

50 






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51 



routine OVER which resides in subroutine INITAL. The other routines 
in INITAL are RECON, RANDOM, SPEED, and INOCC. These establish an 
hourly volume matrix by trip purpose; 1000 random full size and par- 
tial size patches and work site locations; a speed matrix by volume- 
capacity ratio and lane closure; and an available occupancy array 
respectively. 

The second subroutine used in the generation of information matri- 
ces is OPPARA. It consists of two routines. The first is VTIME which 
is an adaptation of a program created by SRI in their development of 
value of time tables^ ' . This routine creates a matrix of the hourly 
values of time by trip purpose for up to 40 one-minute increments of 
time loss as a function of income level. 

The second routine, called OPCOST, creates a matrix of operation 
costs for 65 speeds and for passenger cars and commercial vehicles as 
a function of the roadway alignment and vehicle characteristics. 

Maintenance Simulation 

A series of workload models, applicable to different pavement 
types, are used to generate maintenance activity workloads annually in 
the subroutine YEAR. In the subroutine MAINT, each activity is addres- 
sed singularly and based on constraints applicable to each activity, 
the occupancy of the roadway by work crews is simulated. The occupancy 



^ ^Thomas, Thomas C, Thompson, Gordon I., "The Value of Time Saved 
by Trip Purpose, Stanford Research Institute Project MSU-7362, 
October 1970. 



52 



requirement time In days is accumulated by the hour of the day and lane 
closure. Crew hours are accumulated and costed with activity standards 
to produce activity costs. At intervals, which can be indicated through 
interfacing with a pavement systems program or controlled by the user, 
resurfacing is executed and the associated occupancy requirements and 
costs accumulated. 

The subroutines YEAR and MAINT of the program EAROMAR were designed 
to permit maximum adaptability at the State level. The individual work- 
load models can be factored, overridden or deleted completely. Each of 
the constraints built into the simulation process can be simply over- 
ridden by the user. The activity production and unit cost data can be 
based on local practices. Activities, not accounted for in the exist- 
ing program, can be added by the user. 

Motorist Impact 

Through the maintenance simulation in subroutine MAINT the period 
of roadway occupancy for each activity is established for each feasible 
lane closure. In MOTOR, the impact on the motorist as a result of the 
roadway occupancy is evaluated in terms of reduced speeds, delays and 
volume changes at hourly intervals. These parameters are used in the 
routines VOCOST, TIME, ACCIDT and POLUTE to develop motorist impacts. 

In VOCOST, an hourly analysis is made of the operation costs asso- 
ciated with a lane closure. The analysis is based on hourly volume, 
operation speed, delays and speed changes. The normal operation cost 
for the hour is subtracted and the net difference accumulated for all 
hours and days of roadway occupancy for each activity and closure 
category. 

53 



In th,e routine TIME, the speed and delay information is used to 
develop a loss time per vehicle which is then held as loss manhours and 
dollars by activity and closure category. 

ACCIDT is used to predict potential increases in accident numbers 
and costs. 

The added days of pollution resulting from "a roadway occupancy are 
determined in the routine POLUTE. 

In support of a pavement design systems program, "EAROMAR" is 
designed to select the lane closure category which produces the least 
overall costs for each activity. These are totaled for all activities 
and discounted for present worth in each analysis year. 

The program also is executable independent of a pavement systems 
analysis. Print options available to the user permit output on each 
activity by lane closure category for each of the 7 following categories 
by roadway direction annually: 

1. Activity costs 

2. Operation cost 

3. Accidents 

4. Accident costs 

5. Manhours loss 

6. Time cost 

7. Added days of pollution 



54 



REQUIRED INPUT 

The minimum data deck required to execute the program EAROMAR con- 
sist of the follov/ing: (1) a traffic card, (2) a design card, and (3) 
a packet option end card. Figure 15 shows a general flow of the input 
portion of subroutine INITAL. It illustrates the position of the re- 
quired input statements. A packet option end card will cause the rou- 
tine OVER to be bypassed. 

Traffic 

The traffic card provides the program with the initial and final 
year traffic volume, AM peak split and the percentage of commercial 
traffic. 

In the program it is assumed that the growth in traffic volume is 
linear between the initial and final analysis year. This linear assump- 
tion also holds for the AM split percentage and the commercial vehicle 
percentage. 

Volume 

The volume is a key input parameter to the program. It is used in 
the determination of 18-kip axle loadings and therefore has a potential 
impact on the analysis age used in the maintenance workload models. As 
age increases maintenance workload increases and therefore the hours of 
roadway occupancy. 

The volume is used in the establishment of the volume^capacity 
ratio. Where a volume-capacity ratio restriction exists relating to 
roadway occupancy, volume increases will reduce the available hours in 

55 



Default Initialization ^ 



INITAL 




► Required Input 



Optional Input 



Figure 15. General flow of portion of subroutine INITAL 
illustrating required and optional input flow 
levels in program EAROMAR 



56 



a day during which work crews are permitted to occupy the roadway to 
perform work. This creates less efficient operations thereby increas- 
ing the required roadway occupancy hours and maintenance costs. 

Speed is a function of the volume-capacity ratio. Because capacity 
is constant with time, increases in volume create decreases in speed. 
Operation costs change with vehicle speed, time losses increase with 
speed reduction, and pollution increases with speed reduction. All 
major indexes of impact to the motorist. 

Queues are created in any hour where volumes exceed capacity. 
Queue delays will increase as volume increases. This creates higher 
vehicle operating costs, larger time losses, time costs and increased 
pollution. 

Finally, volumes in themselves are multipliers applied to any 
motorist losses. As volumes increase, the multiplier effect increases. 

AM Peak Split 

The analysis is performed by direction to allow the program user 
to adequately accommodate variations in hourly distributions by trip 
purpose. This is accomplished by assigning the appropriate distribu- 
tion and trip purpose percentage of total volume to each direction. 

Commercial Vehicles 

The commercial percentage is important to many phases of the analy- 
sis and therefore is required as input. Further, as required input, it 
supersedes any defaults or optional inputs to the program. As an exam- 
ple, the percentage of commercial vehicles is included with the trip 

57 



purposes. The trip purpose array has been assigned default values. 
This commercial default value is overridden and assigned the percentage 
associated with the required traffic input. 

The commercial volume is treated separately throughout the pro- 
gram. It is used in developing 18 kip axles, has its own operating 
cost array, is treated separately for speed change cost and in the 
value af time evaluation. 

Traffic Data Card 

The traffic data is input on a single data card. The card format 
is illustrated in Table 4. The traffic data card must be the first 
card in the data deck. 

Pes i gn 

The second element of required input for the program is the design 
data card. It contains information relating to the pavement which is 
deemed necessary to the economic analysis of roadway occupancy. This 
includes the analysis period, the freeway type, the pavement type, the 
project length, and the pavement thickness. 

Analysis Period 

This input parameter controls the number of years that the analy- 
sis is performed. 

Freeway Type 

The program is designed to analyze 4-, 6-, and 8-lane freeways. 
The actual freeway type must be known because it establishes the num- 
ber of directional lanes. The number of lane closures and therefore 

58 



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59 



closure categories being analyzed are entirely controlled by the num- 
ber of directional lanes. The freeway types are coded with the fol- 
lowing switches: 

1. Switch = 1 = 4-lane 

2. Switch = 2 = 6-1 ane 

3. Switch = 3 = 8-lane 

Pavement Type 

The pavement type controls the activity workload models to be 
used by the program. A different set of workload models is included 
in the program for each pavement type. Also, default options relating 
to activity standards, simulation parameters and present serviceability 
index computations depend on pavement type. The pavement type is 
identified by the following switches: 

1. Switch = 1 = Portland cement concrete pavement 

2. Switch = 2 = Bituminous pavement 

3. Switch = 3 = Composite pavement 

Project Length 

The project length influences the magnitude of activity expendi- 
tures and motorist impacts. Also, where the alignment option is exerci- 
sed in the determination of operation costs, the actual mileage of each 
alignment class can be specified directly to the program. A unit mile 
project length can be used, but the alignment data must be prorated 
accordingly. 



60 



Pavement TKlckness 

To accomodate both portland cement concrete and bituminous pave- 
ment types, up to three pavement thicknesses can be entered--surface, 
base, and subbase. The thickness values are used to determine pave- 
ment life axle loadings based on AASHO road tests results. 

Design Data Card 

The design data is input on a single data card. The card format 
is illustrated in Table 5. The design data card must be the second 
card in the data deck. 

Packet Option 

One last data card is required as part of the required input deck 
to the program. This is the packet option card which is used to termi- 
nate or bypass the optional input reading routine "OVER." The packet 
option card must be the last card in the data deck stream. Its format 
is illustrated in Table 6. The three data cards of the required input 
deck are shown in Figure 16. 



61 



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Card NOoS-Packet Option = "bEND" 




Figure 16. The minimum input deck requirement 
for program EAROMAR 



64 



OPTIONAL INPUT 

The user Kas available to him a wide variety of optional input 
provisions which can be used to structure the execution of the program 
"EAROMAR" to comply with local policies, procedures and conditions. 
These cover essentially eyery assumption made in the program together 
with all updatable unit cost elements. Some of the overrides can be 
used to effect changes to the processing pro(;edure. The options are 
available through the use of input packets. These packets are princi- 
pally designed to accommodate input format and therefore changes to 
various elements in the program may require the use of different packet 
combinations. The packets can be used in any sequence. The only con- 
straints to the user relate to compliance with packet format. The 
packets available to the program user are shown in Table 7, where the 
format constraints and packet requirements are illustrated. In Figure 
17 a schematic flow of routine OVER is illustrated, OVER is the routine 
where all option input is handled. 

Activity Workload 

The program incorporates a series of workload models which can be 
used to predict the annual activity workload to be associated with 
various pavement types. Through optional inputs, the user can modify, 
substitute, or entirely bypass one or all of these program models. 



65 



Table 7 . Option input packets available 
for program EAROMAR 



Packet 
Option 
Number 


Description 


Maximum 
Descriptor 
Cards 


Format 

Descriptor 

Card 


Blank 

End 

Card 


1 


Traffic Distribution 


7 


3I2,24F3.3 


Yes 


2 


Trip Purpose Distribution 


6 


2I2,6F3.3 


Yes 


3 


Directional Balance 





N/A 


No 


4 


Occupancy Constraints 


9 


312 


Yes 


5 


Override Array 


84 


212, F7. 2 


Yes 


6 


Alignment Description 


18 


212, F7. 2 


Yes 


7 


Vehicle Description 


10 


3F5.2 


Yes 


8 


Simulation Description 




I2,5F10.2 


Yes 


9 


Operation Unit Costs 




I2,2F4.2 


Yes 


10 


Print Switch 




212 


No 


11 


Lane Width 




F5.2 


No 


12 


Income 




12 


No 


13 


Occupancy Moves 




2F5.2 


No 


14 


Terminal PS I 




F5.2 


No 


15 


Detour Parameters 




7F4.1 


No 


16 


Design Life 




2F5.2 


No 


17 


Activity Standards 


21 


2I2,3F7.2 


Yes 


18 


Capacities 




5F5.2 


No 


19 


Freeway Design Speed 




F5.2 


No 


20 


Average Accident Cost 




F5.0 


No 


21 


Vehicle Occupancy 




2F5.2 


No 


22 


Commercial Time Value 




F5.2 


No 


23 


Speed Limits 




5F5.2 


No 



66 




Figure 17. Schematic of overriding routine OVER 
used for optional inputs. 



67 



The workload models incorporated in the program are the following: 

y = Original pavement age 

ia = Activity number 

A = Pavement analysis age 

F = Workload Factor (0VER(3,ia)) 

L = Lane width in feet (WIDTH) 

ML = Maintenance Level (0VER(6,ia)) 

ia = Workload units per lane mile for activity ia 

S = Workload spacing in feet (0VER(2,ia)) 

PCC Pavement: 

Full Depth Concrete Patching: 

Wj = F X SVd+e-f'^-lO'-l-^S)) 

Partial Depth Concrete Patching: 

Wp = F X W, where W^ < 1 

Wp = F X 1 where W, > 1 

**W^ = W^ - W2/F 
Blowups: 

W^ = .005 X (y-4) X F where 5 < y < 25 

Joint Sealing: 

W4 = ((5280 X L)/SxML 
Mudjacking: 

Wg = .25(.5y)V-^^ 



** 



The partial concrete repair is deducted from W, 



68 



other: 

Wg = Constant workload which can be supplied by the 
program user with variable 0VER(4,6) using 
packet No. 5 

Resurfacing: 

W7 = 586.67 X L X F 
Bituminous Pavement: 

Bituminous Concrete Patching: 

Wj = F X 1100/(l+e-<'^-l°)''l-lS') 
Crack Sealing: 

W2 = F X 1000/(l+e-('^-l°'/l-16)) 
Base and Surface Repair: 



'3 
Other: 



W, = F X 5/(Ue-(*-10'/l-l«)) 



^4-6 ~ Constant workload which can be supplied by the 
program user with variable 0VER(4,4-6) using 
packet No. 5 

Overlay: 

W7 = 586.67 X L X F 
Composite Pavement: 
Patching: 

Wj = F X 1100/(l+e-('^-")/l-16)) 



69 



Blowups: 

Wo = -005 X y-4 X F where 5 < y < 25 

Crack Sealing: 

W^ = F X 1000/(l+e-(*-10)/l-16) 

Mudjacking: 

Wg = .25(.5y)^e'*^^ 



Other: 



Wp g = Constant workload which can be supplied by the 
' program user with variable 0VER(4,2 or 6) using 



packet No. 5 



Overlay: 



W^ = 586.67 X L X F 

Activity Deletion 

The user can simply bypass an activity and its associated workload 
model by setting the maintenance level equal to zero. The maintenance 
level is controlled by variable "0VER(6,IA)" which can be overridden 
in packet No. 5 as illustrated in Table 8. In the example, the main- 
tenance level is 2. This means that the freeway will be occupied in 
two periods of the year and one-half of the annual workload will be 
done during each occupancy period. 



70 



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71 



Activity Workload Factoring 

Should tKe user determine that the level of workload predicted by 
a workload model is too large or small, it can be factored in the pro- 
gram. The factor variable is "0VER(3,IA)". To double the workload 
generated annually by the program, the user assigns a value of 2 to 
the variable 0VER(3,IA) in Packet No. 5 which is shown in Table 8. 

Activity Workload Rate 

When the activity is applicable but the user does not agree with 
the values predicted by the model, the option is available to substitute 
a single workload rate. This is done using 0VER(4,IA) in Packet No. 5. 
Also, this variable can be used to establish a workload rate for any 
of the seven activity numbers, regardless of whether a workload model 
presently exists in the program. A workload rate of 11.2 units per 
lane mile annually is illustrated for Activity 3 in Tables. 

Workload Spacing 

The spacing between work sites, when applicable, is determined by 
the variable 0VER(2,IA). In the determination of joint sealing, the 
number of joints is controlled by this variable. The default value of 
50 feet for Activity 4 is illustrated for this override in Table 8. 

An example of Packet 5 is shown schematically in Figure 18. 

Activity Standards 

Because of the wide use made of activity standards by highway agen- 
cies, the program was designed to accept standard activity data. Three 

72 



Blank Card 



Card No. 7"0VER(4,1) 



Card No. 7- 0VER(3,2) 



Card No. 7- 0VER(6,5) 



Card No. 3, Switch=5 




Packet 5 



Figure 18. Schematic of Packet No. 5 used in the 
override example of workload models 



73 



components are needed to describe an activity to tKe program. These 
are: 

1. The crev\AS hourly costs for labor and equipment 

2. The material costs per workload unit 

3. The production rate in workload units per hour 

In the program, the activity standard is used to determine the time 
required to perform work at a worksite through the use of the produc- 
tion rate given for the standard. This materially controls the hours 
of roadway occupancy. The combined crew hourly cost and material unit 
cost are used in determining maintenance and rehabilitation costs. 

The user has the option of incorporating his own activity perform- 
ance data into the analysis through the use of Packet No. 17. The 
program associates a standard with a pavement type so the pavement type 
must be specified using the following switches: 

1. Switch = 1 = PCC pavement 

2. Switch = 2 = Bituminous pavement 

3. Switch = 3 = Composite pavement 

Three of the default standards are illustrated in Table 9 where the 
packet format requirement is shown. The example packet is illustrated 
schematically in Figure 19. 

Resurfacing 

A number of variables in the program control resurfacing. When 
the .resurfacing cycle is not executed through interfacing with a pave- 
ment system's design program, the program EAROMAR generates its own 

74 



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75 



Blank Card 



Card No. 19-PS(5,l-3) 



Card No. 19-PS(3,l-3) 



Card No. 19-PS(l,l-3) 



Card No. 3-Switch=17 




Packet 17 



Figure 19. Activity standard override packet 

76 



cycles based on a terminal value for a present serviceability index 
CPSI). The value for this variable, PSIRS, can be optionally input 
by the user. The program default value of 2 is shown as an example in 
Table 10 where the format for override packet No. 14 is illustrated. 
The rate at which the terminal PSI is reached is based in part on the 
18-kip axle loadings which are controlled either by the traffic para- 
meters in the program or through interfacing with a pavement system's 
design program. Resurfacing also can depend on the pavement design 
life, both initial and resurfaced. These variables can be controlled 
by the user through Packet No. 16 which also is illustrated with program 
default values in Table 10. 

The resurfacing cost is controlled by the activity standard 
covered earlier and the workload by the pavement lane width. The width 
can be specified to the program using Packet No. 11 and this is illus- 
trated in Table 10 with a program default value of 12 feet. 

The packet sets used for the resurfacing overrides are shown in 
Figure 20. 

Simulation 

Once an annual workload has been established by the program, a 
simulation process is used to generate the roadway occupancy hours 
required annually for each pavement work activity. The simulation pro- 
cess involves assigning work crews to the roadway to perform work during 
available occupancy hours. In the execution of this simulation process, 
a number of constraints and assumptions are made. These are all subject 
to user overrides using the input options. 

77 



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78 



i 



Card No. 13-WIDTH 



Card No. 3-Switch=ll 



Card No. 18~DLIFE 
RLIFE 



Card No. 3-Switch=16 



Card Ho. 16-PSIRS 



Card No. 3-Switch=14 



Packet 11 



Packet 15 



Packet 14 



Figure 20. Packet sets for pavement 
resurfacing overrides 



79 



Worksite Size 

The size of the workload at each worksite is determined by the 
three following variables: 

1. Worksite type 

2. Worksite multiplier 

3. Worksite add-on 

The worksite type is controlled by specifying one of the following 
types of worksites using the worksite type switch in the variable 
SIM which is part of Packet No. 8. The three switches are: 

1 = Full size patch; this value resides in an array which has 1000 
such patches. They were generated by the program, are random in size 
and conform to a gamma density distribution with a mean patch size of 
16 and a standard deviation of 21 when a portland cement concrete pave- 
ment is specified. When the pavement if bituminous, the size is 
multiplied by 10 or has a mean value of 160. This distribution is shown 
in Figure 21. 

2 = Partial depth concrete patch; this value resides in an array 
which has 1000 such patches. They were generated by the program, are 
random in size and conform to a modified gamma density distribution 
where the gamma distribution creates a mean size of 3 and a standard 
deviation of 2. However, the distribution allows for patch sizes 
between 15 and 40 S.F. at a ten percent acceptance level. This distri- 
bution also is illustrated in Figure 21. 

3 = Number of lanes closed; this type accommodates worksite work- 
loads which are related to the number of lanes which can be worked on, 
e.g., two 12' joints can be sealed if two lanes are closed. 

80 



FULL DEPTH PATCH 




PARTIAL DEPTH PATCH 



40 



SIZE 

Figure 21. Frequency distribution of the patches computed by 
the program EAROMAR 



81 



The worksite multiplier is us.ed to increase or decrease tKe mag- 
nitude of tfie worksite indicated by the worksite type switch. 

The worksite add-on is a constant value which can be added to the 
product of the worksite type and the multiplier. As an example let: 
W. = Worksite type 
F = Worksite type multiplier 
A = Worksite type add-on 

S = Workload at each worksite 
then: 

S = W. X F + A 

Number of Simulations 

The user also can control the number of iterations which will be 
used in the simulation process. The maximum number is 1000, which is 
controlled by the size of the random arrays available for use in the 
simulation. The iteration number will control accuracy and computer 
execution time. Where random parameters are selected, or where work- 
site time is short, longer iterations are warranted. 

Worksite Spacing 

The user can establish whether the worksites will be uniformly 
spaced or randomly spaced where the spacing switch is: 

1. Switch = 1 = Random 

2. Switch = 2 = Uniform 

The uniform spacing is based on the input override variable 0VER(2,IA) 
which specifies worksite location spacing in feet. The other option 

82 



is random which is based on workload and a program generated random num- 
ber. There are 1000 random numbers in ascending order between and 1. 
The workload is used to determine an average spacing between random 
worksites. 

Packet No. 8 is used to input the variable "SIM" which is shown in 
Table U. The default values used in the program for concrete pavement 
mudjacking are illustrated. These values cause the program to simulate 
the occupancy of a worksite by mudjacing crew 100 times. The workload 
at each site is S where 

S = 3 X (Partial depth patch size) + 10 
The spacing between each site is random and depends on the total mud- 
jacking workload. This spacing is determined in the following manner: 

SW = Simulation Workload 

OW = Occupancy Period Workload 

RN = Random Number between and 1 

L = Lanes closed 

Sta = Worksite Location 

Sta = (SW/(OW X D) X RN 
As mentioned under spacing, the variable 0VER(2,IA) is used to estab- 
lish spacing when SIM(5) is equal to 2. This is located in Packet 
No. 5. 

Simulation Constraints 

There are additional overrides available in Packet No. 5 which 
affect the simulation. They are the following elements which are 

83 



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illustrated in Table 12 and have been assigned the values used as 
defaults in the program: 

1. Travel time 

2. Maintenance level 

3. Cure time 

4. Traffic control 

5. Maximum workzone length 

6. Minimum workzone length 

Travel Time 

The travel time restricts the hours that the crew has available to 
work on the road. It represents the time in hours required to travel 
from a housing or garage facility to the roadway and to return. 

Maintenance Level 

The maintenance level, when greater than 2 will cause the workload 
to be reduced for each occupancy, i.e., a workload of 100 would be 
reduced to 50 if the maintenance level were 2. Because the workload 
controls spacing when the worksite locations are random, the maintenance 
level can influence the simulation. 

Cure Time 

Cure time exists to permit the user to accommodate nonproductive 
time on the roadway. This includes material cure periods following 
work at the last occupancy worksite for an occupancy interval, lunch and 
any break time that might be applicable. This is all time which must 
be deducted from available occupancy time before simulating the produc- 
tive work on the roadway. 

85 



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86 



i 



Traffic Control 

Traffic control time is needed to install or remove the signing 
and pavement delineation required to create a safe crew work zone on 
the roadway. In the simulation, at least one installation and one 
removal are allotted to each occupancy interval. 

Zone Length 

The maximum workzone length controls the frequency with which zones 
must be moved. When a long zone is permitted, and worksites are rela- 
tively closely spaced, it may be possible for the work crew to spend 
the entire occupancy interval within a single traffic zone. When zones 
are short, the work crew must establish zones at frequent intervals 
and in the simulation, this results in a less efficient operation and 
therefore more hours of roadway occupancy to complete a fixed workload. 
However, the long zones result in long influence zones on the motorist 
and this can create higher motorist impacts. The minimum work zone is 
the length of the worksite area needed for a single repair. This is 
needed in the establishment of the average length of the influence zone 
used in determining motorist impacts. 

Occupancy Moves 

Two other variables influence the simulation process. One is WALK 
which specifies the walking rate between worksites. The other is TCMOVE 
which identifies the speed at which the crew moves between traffic con- 
trol zones. If the distance between worksites within a workzone requires 
more than 6 minutes of walk time, the program assumes that the crew 

87 



rides to tKe next worksite and at tKe rate specified in TCMOVE. Packet 
No. 13 is used to override tKe default values of 2 mph. and 20 mph which 
are illustrated in Table 13. 

The entire simulation package which has just been discussed is 
schematically illustrated in Figure 22. 

Traffic 

The hourly traffic distribution is defined for the following trip 
purposes: 

1. Work 

2. Personal Business 

3. Social -Recreational 

4. School 

5. Vacation 

6. Commercial 

7. Total Travel 

This breakdown of the hourly volume of traffic is by direction and is 
used in the determination of the value of time. The distribution is 
established by the program using default values residing in two differ- 
ent arrays, one defining the shape of the hourly distribution by trip 
purpose and the second defining the percentage of total trips falling 
into a given trip purpose. Both of these arrays are subject to user 
overrides using the input options. 



Traffic Distribution 



An hourly traffic distribution is defined for each trip purpose 
by direction. Figure 23 illustrates the distribution defined by the 

88 





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89 



Card No, 15, WALK TCMOVE 



Card No. 3, Switch=13 



Blank Card 



Card No. 7-0VER(ll,5) 



Card No. 7-0VER(935) 



Card No. 7-0VER(8,5) 



Card No. 7-0VER(7,5) 



Card No. 7-0VER(5,5) 



Card No. 3, Switch=5 



Card No. 10 - SIM(5,l-5) 



Card No. 3, Switch=8 




Packet 13 



Packet 7 



Packet 8 



Figure 22. Schematic of example override packet set 
used in program simulation parameters 



90 



i a 



-i:. 


WORK TR1F>S AM PEAK CHRECTION 


1,1 ! ! ■'! 




17^ ''' r 1 


il ill; il'l ,■ 1 l!n' llll 111! ii ,: ..JllilOiyilhrTOWTTTrm 



20 22 24 



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VACATION TRIPS 



n 



m 



IT 



20 22 24 



WORK TRIPS PM PEAK DIRECTION 




20 22 24 




20 22 24 



HOUR OF 0*V 





20 22 24 



HOUR OF DAT 



20 22 24 




Figure 23. Hourly distributions of traffic by trip purpose 
and direction developed for use as defaults in program 



91 



program for work trips in the AM peak direction. The percentage occur- 
ring in each hour is expressed as the decimal portion of unity (24 hours) 

The following switches are used for trip purpose, direction and 
volume level respectively: 

1. Trip Purpose 

A. Switch = 1 = Work trips 

B. Switch = 2 = Personal business 

C. Switch = 3 = Social-Recreational 

D. Switch = 4 = School 

E. Switch = 5 = Vacation 

F. Switch = 6 = All commercial 

G. Switch = 7 = All trips 

2. Direction 

A. Switch = 1 = AM Peak Direction 

B. Switch = 2 = PM Peak Direction 

3. Volume Level 

A. Switch = 1 = Initial Year 

B. Switch = 2 = Final Year 

Packet No. 1 is used to input any user overrides to the hourly dis- 
tribution of traffic and the required format is shown in Table 14 where 
the program default values are used as an example. 

If the user elects to input a distribution for all trips, the pro- 
gram reconciles any other trip purpose distributions to conform with 



92 



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93 



tKe total distribution. OtKerwise, the total distribution is the sum 
of the components. Either way, the program balances the total distri- 
bution to sum to unity for the 24-hour period. 

Trip Purpose Distribution 

A decimal portion of all trips is defined for each trip purpose by 
direction for both the initial and final analysis year. The user may 
override this trip purpose distribution by direction and year level. 
The switches used are the following: 

1. Direction 

A. Switch = 1 = AM Peak Direction 

B. Switch = 2 = PM Peak Direction 

2. Year Level 

A. Switch = 1 = Initial Year 

B. Switch = 2 = Final Year 

Packet No. 2 is used to input any user override for trip purpose 
distribution and the required format is shown in Table 15 where the pro- 
gram default values are used as an example. 

The hourly traffic distribution override packets are illustrated 
schematically in Figure 24. 

Occupancy Constraints 

The hours which a freeway may be occupied by work crews can be 
restricted by local policy. Further, the restriction may be different 
for different work activities. Also, constraints might be placed on 
occupying roads during heavy trciffic flows. 

94 



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Card No. 3, Switch=l 




Packet 2 



Packet 1 



Figure 24. Hourly traffic distribution override packets 



96 



TKe program was designed to accommodate occupancy constraints. 
The user has a specification, volume-capacity ratio and crew op- 
tion available to him in defining the available hours for any activity. 

Specification Option 

The array INOCC can be used to specify for each activity the first 
and last hour of the day when roadway may be continuously occupied, i.e., 
an occupancy interval. The user may specify up to nine options. This 
allows multiple occupancy intervals to be specified for the same activ- 
ity. A maximum of seven activities is handled by the program. If the 
user specifies an occupancy interval for each activity, this only 
leaves two options for multiple specification. 

The occupancy interval constraints will be similar for most activi- 
ties. Therefore, a dummy activity number was established. This is 
Activity Number 10. When the program encounters an activity not 
already having a specific assignment, it assigns the dummy's first 
and last hours to the activity. This use of a dummy activity permits 
a blanket specification of an occupancy interval to multiple activi- 
ties and leaves more options available for multiple specifications 
to a single activity. 

Program default occupancy intervals are assigned to all activities 
using a tenth option position for variable INOCC. Any activity option 
specified by tKe user overrides the default assignment to that activity. 
The user can override the default blanket by specifying a dummy activity 
number 10. 



97 



Tlie specification options for occupancy intervals are Kandled in 
Packet No. 4. The present program defaults are in two parts, a dummy 
blanket activity 10 which assigns all activities the occupancy interval 
7 A.M. to 6 P.M. Also used in the program as a default is the interval 
3 P.M. to 6 P.M. for the concrete pavement activity, blowups. This 
specification resides in option position number one and will be over- 
ridden by any use of Packet 4 by the user. 

Table 16 summarizes the present default options in the program. In 
Table 17 the format requirements for entering Packet 4 are illustrated. 
The example values used in Table 17 are shown in Table 16 and illus- 
trate how the occupancy intervals have changed. 

Volume-Capacity Ratio Option 

Many maintenance organizations require that traffic volumes be 
below some specified threshold before crews are permitted to occupy the 
roadway. The program provides for a volume-capacity ratio constraint 
on occupancy. Each hour of available occupancy is tested against the 
volume-capacity ratio in that hour. If the allowed ratio is exceeded, 
the available hour is made unavailable. The variable 0VER(11,IA) in 
Packet No. 5 is used to specify a permitted volume-capacity ratio for 
roadway occupancy. The example shown in Table 18 illustrates some 
of the default values presently used in the program. When the volume- 
capacity constraint is not wanted, as for Activity Number 3, blowups, 
a large value is specified. This also is illustrated in Table 18. 



98 





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101 



Crew Option 

There may be occasions when the local highway organization desires 
to close portions of a roadway for days at a time. This creates a 
24-hour closure impact on the motorist. The program treats a 24-hour 
assignment of crew time in variable 0VER(1,IA) as allowing roadway to 
be available for occupancy continuously. Further, all other constraints 
are suppressed by the use of this crew option specification of 24 
hours. An example of a 24-hour crew override for Activity Number 7 is 
shown in Table 18 as part of Packet No. 5. 

The specification of. this override suppresses both the specifica- 
tion option and the volume-capacity constraint indicated for the same 
activity earlier. The override packets used for the three occupancy 
options are shown in Figure 25. 

Speed 

A principal component in the development of motorist impacts is 
speed, i.e., the difference in speed between normal and roadway occupancy 
conditions. Vehicle speed dictates the level of vehicle operation cost 
and the magnitude of speed changes. It influences the magnitude of 
loss time and therefore the value of time losses. Finally, pollution 
emission rates will be larger for slower speeds. 

Speed will be closely related to the volume-capacity ratio on a 
roadway. Also, speed will depend on the roadway design speed and the 
enforced speed limit on the roadway. An algorithm is used in the program 
to develop an array of speeds for a range of volume-capacity ratios. 

102 



Blank Card 



Card No„ 7-0VER(l,7) 



Card No. 7-0VER(10,7) 



Card No. 7-0VER(10,5) 



Card No. 7-0VER(10,3) 



Card No. 7-0VER(10a) 



Card No. 3-Switch=5 



Blank Card 



Card No. 6-IN0CC(3,l-3) 



Card No. 6-IN0CC(2,l-3) 



Card No. 6-IN0CC(l,l-3) 



Card No. 3-Switch=4 




Packet 5 



Packet 4 



Figure 25. Example packet set used in the specification 
of available roadway occupancy time 



103 



The variables in this algorithm are Design Speed CDSPEED), Capacity 
(CAP), and the Speed Limit (SLIMIT). The user can control each of 
these variables using optional Inputs. Therefore, the user can con- 
trol the speed matrix developed for each closure category. 

The observations made during field studies revealed that the 
speed limits were unenforced around lane closures. The motorist 
drives as fast as possible for the conditions. Therefore, a speed 
limit is needed which will produce the observed average highway speeds. 
The program sets the average highway speed equal to 90 percent of the 
speed limit. Therefore, to get a 55 mph free flow speed requires a 
speed limit of 61 mph. 

The speed curves generated by the program algorithm are illustra- 
ted for design speeds and speed limits of 70, 60, and 50 miles per 
hour and a lane capacity of 2000 vehicles per hour in Figure 26. 

For a freeway design speed of 70 mph, the curves for speed limits 
of 60, 50, 40, and 30 are shown in Figure 27. The influence of changes 
to the capacity are illustrated in Figure 28. 

The user can control the speed curve matrix generated by the pro- 
gram for each closure category by using the override option to specify 
values for the freeway design speed, closure category speed limits and 
capacity. 

Freeway Design Speed 

Packet No. 19 can be used to input a freeway design speed. The 
program default value is illustrated in Table 19. 

104 




v/c 



Figure 26. Speed curves for highway designs of 70, 
60, and 50 mph where speed limit equals design 
speed 



105 




v/c 



Figure 27. Speed curves for a range of speed limits 
on a road with a 70 mph design speed 



106 



70 



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10 — 




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Figure 28. The influence of capacity on a road designed 
for 70 mph 



107 





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108 



Speed Limit 

The speed limit is overridden with Packet No. 23. The sequence 
used in complying v/itPi the format requirements for the speed limit is 
important. The position controls the subscript used for the variable 
SLIMIT. The array SLIMIT has a maximum of 5 subscripts. Depending on 
the directional lanes, each subscript represents a road closure cate- 
gory. These categories are illustrated in Table 20. Therefore, if 
the user desires to describe a speed limit of 35 miles per hour on the 
detour used for traffic on an eight-lane freeway, subscript position 4 
is assigned 35 mph. 

In Table 20, the program default values are illustrated. These 
are for an eight-lane freeway which is the maximum size handled by the 
program. 

Capacity 

Packet No. 18 is used to specify closure capacities. The capacity 
is controlled by subscripts in the same manner as the speed limit. The 
sample format is shown in Table 19 and the subscript definition in 
Table 20. 

The example set of packets used for controlling the program speed 
matrix is illustrated in Figure 29. 

Shoulders 

For each roadway lane closure, the user has the option of allowing 
traffic to use shoulders. The effect of having shoulders is to incre- 
ment the capacity of a closure category. As an example, the default 

109 



Table 20. Interpretation given to the subscripts for 
variables SLIMIT and CAP by tKe program EAROMAR 



Description of Closure Categories 



Subscript 
Value 


8-1 ane 
Freew^ay 


6-1 ane. 
Freeway 


4.-1 ane 
Freeway 


1 


Three lanes open 
to traffic 


Two lanes open 
to traffic 


One lane open 
to traffic 


2 


Two lanes open 
to traffic 


One lane open 
to traffic 


Traffic sent 
to detour 


3 


One lane open 
to traffic 


Traffic sent 
to detour 


4w0-la«es-open 
to traffic 


4 


Traffic sent to 
detour 


Three lanes 
open to traffic 




5 


4 lanes open 
to traffic 







110 



Card No. 25-SLIMIT(l-5) 



Card No. 3-Switch=23 



Card No. 21-DSPEED 



Card No. 3-Switch=19 



Card No. 20-CAP(l-5) 



Card No. 3-Swttcf\»18 



Packet 23 



Packet 19 



Packet 18 



Figure 29. Packet sets used to control 
the program speed matrix 



111 



capacity assigned to a shoulder is 800 veKicles per iiour. If two out 
of three directional lanes are closed to the motorist, the program 
default capacity for the closure category is 1900 vehicles per hour. 
If one shoulder is specified, then the capacity increases to 2700 
vehicles per hour. This will have an influence on the speed through 
the influence zone because speed is a function of the volume-capacity 
ratio. 

When all lanes are closed to the motorist, the program first checks 
to determine if any shoulders are available. When shoulders are avail- 
able, they are used and the speed is based on the one lane open to the 
motorist category. The capacity is that of the shoulder. If no shoul- 
ders are available, a detour situation is assumed. 

The specification of shoulders is handled by Packet No. 5 using the 
variable 0VER(12,IA) where I A is the activity number. The format is illus- 
trated in Table 21 where the program default of two shoulders for Activ- 
ity No. 3, blowups, and no shoulders for activities 1 and 2 are illustra- 
ted. The packet is illustrated in Figure 30. 

Detours 

One closure category in the program is the detouring of traffic and 
the closing of all directional lanes on the freeway. The program auto- 
matically exercises this option when there are no shoulders to be used 
and all directional lanes are closed. Because there are an infinite 
number of detour possibilities, a set of parameters to describe the detour 
is made available to the user. 

112 



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113 



Blank Card 



Card No. 7-0VER(12,2) 



Card No. 7-0VER(12,l) 



Card No. 7-0VER(12,3) 



Card No. 3-Switch=5 




Packet 5 



Figure 30. Schematic of Packet No. 5 
as used to control shoulders 



114 



TKe variable DETOUR Kolds tKe detour parameters and tlie variable 
subscripts represent th,e following parameters: 

1. TKe distance between interchanges in miles 

2. The detour length in miles 

3. The speed limit associated with the operation on the detour 

4. The detour average daily traffic volume in 1000 's 

5. The detour capacity in 1000' s 

6. The average number of traffic signal stops which effect 
all traffic on detour 

7. The number of lanes on the detour 

Distance Between Interchanges 

The program assumes an influence zone on the freeway equal to the 
distance between interchanges. This is the normal vehicle operation 
area which is compared with operation on the detour in determining 
motorist impacts. 

Detour Length 

The detour length is the influence zone for all detoured traffic. 
The difference between motorist impacts on the detour and the freeway 
is the basis for evaluating the cost of the detour closure category. 

Detour Speed Limit 

The speed limit on the detour is one parameter used in developing 
a speed matrix for operation on the detour. 



115 



Detour Vol ume 

The volume on the detour under normal conditions must be added to 
the volume diverted from the freeway in determining vehicle operating 
characteristics on the detour. 

Detour Capacity 

The capacity on the detour influences the speed matrix and con- 
trols operational speeds through the volume-capacity ratio and the oc- 
currence and magnitude of queues. 

Signal Stops 

The costs of speed changes for both normal operation on the detour 
and detour operation when freeway traffic is detoured are based on the 
number of signal stops on the detour. The signal stops should reflect 
a composite number of stops for all vehicles operating on the detour. 

Lanes on Detour 

The detour lanes are needed to convert detour capacity to lane 
capacity in the determination of the speed matrix for the detour. 

There are nany situations where the volume on the freeway may far 
exceed the capacity of any single detour route. The specifications for 
the detour can be enlarged to reflect a multiple number of routes by 
appropriate increases in volume, capacity and lanes. 

The user specifies the detour parameters using Packet No. 15. The 
format and program default values for this packet are shown in Table 22 . 
The packet is illustrated in Figure 31. 



116 



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117 



Card No. 17-DET0UR(l-7) 



Card No. 3-Switch=15 



Packet 15 



Figure 31. Packet No. 15 used in the 
specification of detour parameters 



118 



Vehicle Operation Costs 

TPie velilcle operation costs used in tKe program are based on the 
vehicle consumption parameters: fuel, tires, oil, maintenance and 
depreciation. Within the program a series of models exists which pre- 
dict each of the consumption parameters as a function of roadway 
alignment, vehicle weight and vehicle speed. The program generates an 
operation cost array for passenger cars and for commercial vehicles. 
These arrays are based on consumption parameters computed using default 
values for vehicle weight and roadway alignment. The weight and align- 
ment assumptions may be overridden by the user. Also, default values 
for the unit costs of fuel, oil, tires and maintenance are used in 
creating the passenger car and commercial vehicle hourly operating 
cost arrays. These unit costs also can be overridden by the user. 

Roadway Alignment 

The user can specify to the program the roadway alignment to the 
nearest even positive and negative grade between 1 and 6 percent and the 
horizontal alignment to the nearest even degree between 1 and 6 degrees. 
The alignment is specified through the use of the following switches: 

1. Switch = 1 = Positive grade 

2. Switch = 2 = Negative grade 

3. Switch = 3 = Horizontal curvature 

These overrides are made using Packet No. 6 as illustrated in Table 23, 
The user provides the mileage of roadway falling into a specified grade 
or curvature category and the program develops composite consumption 

119 



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120 



parameters wliicli are used in the development of the hourly vehicle 
operation costs matrices. A normal tangent section Is the default 
alignment assumed In the program. 

The example values shown In Table 24 reflect .6 miles of +2% 
grade, .13 miles of 3 degree curvature and .81 miles of -1% grade. 

Vehicle Class Data 

The vehicle class data consist of vehicle weight in kips; the 
percentage of vehicles in the specified weight class and the purchase 
price of the vehicle. Up to ten vehicle classes may be specified by 
the user. However, in the event of any optl6nal override to the default 
values, the user must place the typical passenger vehicle data into 
the first class specified. All other vehicle classes are combined 
into a single composite commercial vehicle class. 

Packet No. 7 is used to input the vehicle classification data 
overrides. The values shown as examples in Table 24 are the default 
values assigned by the program when no user overrides are input. 

Unit Costs 

In the economic analyses that have been developed to make benefit 
cost analysis for highways, it is the unit costs, built into the many 
analysis graphs and tables that have made the analyses obsolete within 
short time periods. Although the consumption parameters predicted by 
the models Incorporated Into the program may not be completely valid 
as vehicle operation characteristics change in the future, these latter 
parameters are unlikely to change as rapidly as the unit cost. 

121 



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122 



This program provides the user viith. the option to specify current 
unit costs for fuel, tires and oil. Further, a price Index can be 
used to directly update vehicle maintenance costs. 

The price Index factor presently used In the program as a default 



Is based on the 1974-64 ratio of service prices reported In Economic 

vehii 
S 2) 



Indicators^ . The vehicle maintenance cost models are based on data 



developed by Winfrey 

The type of unit cost Is specified through the use of the follow- 
ing switches: 

1. Switch = 1 = Fuel cost per g'allon 

2. Switch = 2 = Oil cost per gallon 

3. Switch = 3 = Tire cost per .001 inch wear 

4. Switch = 4 = Vehicle maintenance price index factor 
The format requirement for the unit costs is shown in Table 25. 

The series of override packets which have been illustrated in 
Table 23 through 25 are combined in the schematic shown In Figure 32. 

Value of Time 

( 3 ) 
The value of time is based on the work done at SRT . One 

variable included in the value of time equations incorporated in the 

program is income level. The user has the option of specifying this 



Economic Indicators, June 1974, United States Government Printing 
Office, Washington, 1974. 

Winfrey, Robley, "Economic Analysis for Highways," International 

Textbook Company, Scranton, Pennsylvania, 1969. 
3 
Thomas, T. C, and Thompson, G., "The Value of Time Saved by Trip 

Purpose," Stanford Research Institute, October 1970. 

123 






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Blank Card 



Card No. 9-WEIGHT(9,l-3) 



Card No. 9-WEIGHT(3,l-3) 



Card No. 9-WEIGHT(2,l-3) 



Card No. 9-WEIGHT(l,l-3) 



Card No. 3-Switch=7 



Blank Card 



Card No. 8-ALIGN(2,l) 



Packet 7 



Card No. 8-ALIGN(3,3) 



Card No. 8-ALIGN(l,2) 



Card No. 3-Switch=6 



Blank Card 



Card No. 11-SINDEX 



Card No. ll-TIRES(l-2) 



Card No. ll-0IL(l-2) 



Card No. ll-FUEL(l-2) 



Card No. 3-Switch=9 




Packet 6 



Packet 9 



Figure 32. Example packet set used in the estc.blishment 
of a vehicle operating cost array 



125 



value through the optional Input packet No. 12. The value of time 
algorithm uses one of the following income level classes: 

1. Under $3,999/yr. 

2. $4,000-5,999/yr. 

3. $6,000-7,999/yr. 

4. $8,000-9,999/yr. 

5. $10, 000-11, 999/yr.. 

6. $12 ,000-14, 999/yr. 

7. $15, 000-19, 999/yr. 

8. Over $20,000/yr. 

Through the use of the appropriate composite income level for the 
analysis, the user has the ability to update the value of time compu- 
tation and make this component of the economic analysis responsive 
to wage changes in the future. 

The value of time analysis also requires vehicle occupancy for 
work trips and school trips. These also can be optionally input by 
the user with Packet No. 21. 

A single value of time is used for commercial vehicles. The 
default value is 8.75 and it can be overridden by the user through the 
use of Packet No. 22. 

The value of time variables and related packets are shown within 
program default values in Table 26 . Further, the packets are illustra- 
ted schematically in Figure 33. 



126 



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127 



Card No. 24=C0MV0T 



Card No. 3=Switch=22 



Card No. 23-OCWORK 
OCSCHL 



Card No. 3-Sw1tch=21 



Card No. 14-INC 



Card No. 3-Switch=12 



Packet 22 



Packet 21 



Packet 12 



Figure 33. Value of time' override packets 

128 



Accident Cost 

A single dollar value is assigned for eacii accident in tKe develop- 
ment of accident costs. The user can specify his own estimate using 
Packet No. 20 as shown in Table 27 and Figure 34 where the default cost 
of $850 per accident is used as an example. 

Output 

Output occurs at two locations in the program. The first is pro- 
duced by the subroutine RPRINT. This subroutine documents all the input 
information together with the arrays and scalars which provide basic 
information and constraints to the program process. The user has the 
option of suppressing this printout which runs eight pages. The switches 
used in the control of this printout are the following: 

1. Switch=l = Print 

2. Switch=2 = Do not print 

The second output from the program occurs at the end of analysis. 
Four printout levels are structured for this output. The levels are 
controlled by a print switch which can be controlled by the user. These 
are as follows: 

1. Switch=l = Complete documentation on each activity's costs 

and motorist impacts for each closure category 
by direction each year. 

2. Switch=2 = Complete documentation on each activity's costs 

and motorist impacts for each closure category 
each year. 

129 



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130 



Card No. 22-AACOST 



Card No. 3-Switch=20 



Packet 20 



Figure 34. Override packet No. 20 used for 
specifying an average accident cost 



131 



3. Switch. =3 = Documentation on total activity costs and 

motorist Impacts for minimum costs closure 
category each year. 

4. Switch=4 = The discounted total activity costs and 

motorist impacts for the aggregate minimum 
cost closure category at the end of the 
analysis period. 
Packet No. 10 is used in specifying the desired level of program 

output. The packet is illustrated with the program default values. 

in Table 28 and schematically shown in Figure 35. 



132 



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133 



Card No. 12-IPRINT 
JPRINT 



Card No, 3-Switch=10 



Packet 10 



Figure 35. Packet No. 10 used in specifying 
program output requirements 



134 



DEMONSTRATION RUN 

To illustrate the documentation generated by the program, a demon- 
stration run was made using the program EAROMAR. All of the program 
default values were used so only three data input cards needed to be 
prepared. These were the required input data cards for "Traffic" and 
"Design" together with a "Packet Option" card with the "bEND" designa- 
tion. The "Traffic" input specified for the demonstration was as 
f ol 1 ows : 

Initial Volume = 40,000 ADT 

Initial AM Split 

Initial Commercial = 

Final Volume = 200,000 ADT 

Final AM Split = 50% 

Final Commercial = 5% 
The 'Design" input specified for the demonstration was as follows: 

Analysis Period = 20 years 

Freeway Type = 8-1 ane divided 

Pavement Type = PCC 

Project Length = 10 miles 

Surface Thickness = 10 inches 

Base Thickness = 

Subgrade Thickness = 
A description of the required traffic input for Traffic and Design 
are shown in Tables 4 and 5. The data deck is illustrated in Figure 16, 



135 



The input information together with the arrays and scalars which 
provide basic information and constraints to the program process are 
shown in Figures 36 through 43 in Appendix A. This is program output 
generated by subroutine RPRINT and reflects the default assumption used 
in the program. 

In Appendix B, the output for each of the 20 years in the analysis 
period for the demonstration run is shown. The output reflects the 
default output option number 1. This is the maximum output generated 
by EAROMAR which includes output tables for each direction each year. 
Each activity and lane closure category is summarized for both activity 
and motorist costs together with loss time, increased accidents and 
pollution days. 

A brief explanation of the output table format follows. 

Activity Number 

Each activity number represents a specific maintenance activity 
or resurfacing. In the demonstration run, resurfacing occurs in the 
17th year. At this point the pec pavement changes to a composite pave- 
ment. Consequently a change occurs in the maintenance that the 
activity number represents. The following descriptions are applicable 
to the demonstration run. 



136 



Activity 
Number 


PCC 
Pavement 




Composite 
Pavement 


1 


Full depth PCC 


patch 


Bituminous patching 


2 


Partial depth 


PCC 


patch 


— 


3 


Blowups 






Blowups 


4 


Joint Sealing 






Crack Sealing 


5 
6 
7 


Mudjacking 






Mudjacking 


Resurfacing 






Resurfacing 



Closure Category 

As defined previously in the definition of terms, closure category 
represents a sequence of lane closures. In the demonstration run, 5 
categories are shown. These are summarized as follows:- 

Closure Category Description 



4 lanes closed, detour or 

4 lanes closed, use shoulder 

3 lanes closed, 1 lane closed 
2 lanes closed, 2 lanes closed 

1 lane closed at a time 

4 lanes closed, cross over to 

2 lanes opposite direction 



Maintenance and Rehabilitation 

The total annual costs required for work crews to complete the 
annual workload for the indicated activity and closure category. 



137 



Operation Costs 

The total increase in vehicle operation costs generated when work 
crews occupy the roadway to perform the annual workload for the indica- 
ted activity and closure category. 

Accident Costs 

The total increase in accident costs generated when work crews 
occupy the roadway to perform the annual workload for the indicated 
activity and closure category. 

Accident #X100 

The annual accidents created when work crews occupy the roadway 
to perform the annual workload for the indicated activity and closure 
category. Accidents are expressed as 1/100 accidents because the 
output is integer. A value of 20 means .2 accidents per year. 

Loss Time Costs 

The total value in dollars assigned to loss time created when 
work crews occupy the roadway to perform the annual workload for the 
indicated activity and closure category. 

Loss Time Hours 

The total hours of loss time accumulated for all motorists 
affected by work crews when they occupy the roadway to perform the 
annual workload for the indicated activity and closure category. 



138 



Pollution Days 

The number of days of increased pollution created when work crews 
occupy the roadway to perform the annual workload for the indicated 
activity and closure category. Pollution days are defined on Paqe 8 
They are expressed as 1/100 days because the output is integer. A 
value of 87 for pollution days means .87 pollution days per year. 

Total Costs 

This is a summary of the costs in the columns Maintenance and 
Rehabilitation, Operation Costs, Accident Costs, and Loss Time Costs. 

Total 

The columns are totaled for each closure category. Therefore, 
where 5 closure categories are shown, there are 5 totals. 

Minimum Costs 

The minimum costs results from selecting the minimum total costs 
closure category for each activity and then totaling these minimums 
for all activities. 

Discounted Costs 

The minimum costs are discounted to a present worth costs. In 
the demonstration run this is based on an interest rate of 8%. 

Accumulated Costs 

These are the year to date totals for the discounted costs. 



139 



"******'• 



As noted on the printout, this signifies that the roadway cannot 
be occupied within V/C constraints. This happens first for closure 
category 2 because in the demonstration run this reflects a 3-1 ane 
closure followed by a 1-lane closure. When 3 lanes are closed, wery 
little capacity is available to motorists and therefore the volume/ 
capacity constraints are easily exceeded. This restriction is turned 
on when no hours are available for occupancy. 



140 



APPENDIX A 

Input and Default Arrays and Scalars 
for the Demonstration Run Using 
Program EAROMAR 



k 



141 



TRAFFIC WARRANTS FOR PREiMluM PAVE.^E'^JIS KEwUlKli\G REOUCEU MAINTEMANCE 

ASSUi^.ED VALUES UF A.^ALYSIS VARIAbLtS 

DESIGN: 

EXPRESSWAY TYPE,... B LANE 

PAVEMENT TYPE.... CONCRETE 

ANALYSIS SECTION LENGTH ....iO. MILES 

LANE rtlDTH.. 12.0 FT. 

ANALYSIS Period zo years 

DESIGN LIFE....... 20.0 YEARS 

Ri-SURFACEJ DESIGN LIFE 10. YEARS 

TtR'^lNAL PSI VALUE Z.O 

TRAFF IC: 

liMlTIAL VOLUME. 39999 AAOT 

INITIAL COMMERCIAL .• 10.0 PERCENT 

liSilTlAL AM PEAK SPLIT ^0.0 PtRCENT 

FINAL VOLUME 1999 93 AAOT 

FINAL COMMtRCiAL 1>.0 PERCENT 

FINAL AM PEAK SPLIT dO.O PERCENT 

normal capacity... dooo. vehicles 

1 lanl- Closed capacity 5700. vehicles 

2 latme closed capacity jboo. vehicles 

i lane closed capacity 1700. vehicles 

shoulder capacity '. . . . 800. vehicles 

detour capacity 2^00. vehicles 

distance dftween interchanges z,jo miles 

detour length. 2.o0 miles 

speed limit on detour 45.00 m ph 

NORi'lAL DETOUR VOLUME, 20.00 ADT 

AVERAGE STOPS ON DETOUR 0.80 

DETOUR DIRECTIONAL LANES... 2.00 

FREtwAl^ SPEED LIMIT oO. 00 MPH 

1 LANt CLOSED SPEED LIMIT iiO.OO MPti 

2 LANE CLOSED SPEED LIMIT.... 50.00 MPH 

3 LAiME Closed spled limit. 50.00 mph 

4 LANE CLOSED SPEtD LIMIT 45.00 MPH 

THE AVlkaGE WEIGHT OF A COMMERCIAL VEHICLE IS 3o. KIPS 

THE AASHO BASED ANNUAL DIRECTIONAL la KIP AXLES IS 19d4o34 

Figure 36. Design and traffic variables as 
specified in required input and as 
defined through program defaults 



142 



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145 



TRAFFIC WARRANTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
RANDOM ARRAYS 



NO 


FULL DEPTH 


PARTIAL 


LOCATION 


L 


22.1957 


3.46 7 


0.0002 


^1 


10.7735 


34.9453 


0.0205 


41 


7.46 4^* 


15.7659 


0.0321 


61 


15.6064 


9. 7195 


0.0488 


81 


21.63 74 


9.7335 


0.0666 


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19.0178 


27.3315 


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121 


lo.lo56 


1.9273 


0.1053 


141 


15.2785 


3.5399 


U.ll9i 


161 


9.073O 


4.9414 


0.136£ 


181 


17,88 89 


3.6328 


O.l50i 


201 


20.6576 


1.1136 


0.163': 


221 


1G.9401 


5-4741 


0.1771 


241 


10.2549 


8.6569 


0.200^ 


261 


21.4244 


2.9995 


Q.Zi.^i 


281 


17.5869 


1.5049 


0.2392 


301 


13.3273 


3.4565 


0.2544 


321 


7.9081 


lo.6393 


0.2718 


i41 


13.246^ 


5.2489 


0.2942 


361 


14.&518 


1.7878 


0.3145 


381 


13.594t> 


10.63^3 


0.3356 


tOl 


16.0640 


l6. O560 


0.3552 


421 


34.7477 


7. 76t0 


0.3752 


441 


19.6121 


1.2377 


0.4025 


461 


12.9400 


2.0481 


0.4215 


481 


10.6737 


34.0548 


0.4404 


501 


15.9803 


34-7287 


0.4576 


521 


13.46 86 


5.3819 


0.4813 


5tl 


2 7.3619 


0. 6366 


0.4919 


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8.8369 


0.7089 


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16. 5965 


13.6639 


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601 


14.4446 


33.3176 


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3.9763 


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11.5515 


11.8086 


0.5990 


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23.6066 


1.9978 


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16.1769 


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0.6936 


721 


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4.1222 


0.7120 


741 


13.4040 


6.2810 


0.7372 


761 


11.4030 


0.9865 


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24.2025 


6.4318 


0.7900 


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14.6613 


1.8260 


0.8106 


821 


11.5267 


3^.7818 


0.8236 


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16.0544 


5.9746 


0.8430 


661 


13.8687 


25.2802 


0.8615 


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20.5272 


5.6139 


0.8842 


901 


31.0268 


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0.9033 


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17.O807 


5.3924 


0.9251 


941 


36.3356 


28.62 85 


0.9471 


961 


24.1160 


12.99 75 


0.9648 


981 


22.7044 


0.5225 


0.9799 



Figure 40. Sample of 1000 random full depth and partial depth 
Portland cement concrete patch sizes and random locations. 



146 



TRAH^IC aARKANTS fOri Pm;;-I1JK PAVtMtNTS KtwUlRlNG i^tJUCtU -lAlMTtNANCt 
HUUKLY UlSTrildjnOw UF TRAFFIC 



iMiriAL rfAK: 



a;>i peak DiPecTiuM p^l peak oikection 



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0.033 


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. 046 


0.o74 


0. 043 


0. 161 


0. 000 


0.066 


0.054 


0.141 


Irt 


u.ilo 


0. 141 


0.50J 


O.OOl 


u. 121 


u. 127 


0.051 


U.608 


0. 048 


0.1/2 


0.00 


0. Oo 7 


0.044 


0.148 


IV 


0.073 


0. Iji 


0. 403 


0. 001 


0. I'to 


O.O06 


. Oo^ 


0.395 


0. 132 


O.iii 


0.001 


0.039 


0.048 


0.083 


IQ 


0.031 


0. t03 


0.470 


0.001 


0.058 


0.037 


0.035 


0.121 


0. 371 


0.432 


0.001 


0.040 


0.034 


0.092 


IV 


0. J2/ 


0.432 


0.4u0 


0.001 


0.043 


0.03/ 


0. Oo2 


0.067 


0. 3o8 


0.392 


0.001 


0. 121 


0.031 


0.072 


Id 


0. Jurt 


0. 369 


K).m 


0. 001 


0.024 


0.05 ! 


0.039 


0.174 


0. tOl 


0.201 


0.00 1 


0. 136 


0.037 


0.055 


di 


0.05j> 


0.746 


0.113 


0.002 


0. 


3. 086 


0.02 5 


0.163 


0.513 


0.078 


0.001 


0. 185 


0. 059 


0.036 


2t 


0-07V 


0.810 


u.u27 


0. 002 


0. 009 


0.073 


0.021 


0.2t6 


0.601 . 


0. OZO 


0. 001 


0.077 


0.055 


0.028 


rLAKLY 


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0.00 1 


0.001 


0. OOo 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.002 


0.000 


z 


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O.O 


0. 000 


0.0 


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0.002 


0.O03 


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0.000 


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3 


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0.0 j7 


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0.004 


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0.0 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.007 


-0.000 


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0.000 


O.O 


O.OOu 


0.0 


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-0. 000 


0.007 


0.002 


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0.000 


0.0 


-0.010 


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i 


0. OOt 


0.0 


0. 


0. Ooo 


0.0 


-0. 004 


-0.000 


0. 007 


0.0 


0.0 


0.000 


0.0 


-0.007 


-0.000 


t, 


0.003 


0.00 


0.0 


0. 000 


0.0 


-0.0u3 


-u.OuO 


0.004 


0.002 


0.0 


0.000 


0.0 


-0.00 7 


-0.000 


7 


Ci.^tOi 


0. uuO 


O.OuJ 


u.OOO 


0.000 


-0. ooz 


0. 000 


0. 00'* 


0.00 3 


0. 001 


0.000 


0.0 


-0.009 


-0.000 


8 


0. oo<; 


0. 000 


0. OJU 


0. OoO 


0.000 


-0.002 


O.OuO 


0.006 


0. 002 


0.002 


0. 000 


0.0 


-0.039 


-0.000 


-5 


u.on 


0. :ioo 


0.000 


0.000 


0.001 


-0.003 


-C.OOO 


0.005 


0.001 


0.002 


0.000 


0.001 


-0.009 


-0.000 


10 


0.002 


0.000 


O.OOl 


0.000 


0.001 


-0.004 


-0. 000 


0.001 


0.001 


0. 00 a 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.008 


-0.000 


U 


O.OOl 


0.000 


0.002 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.003 


-u.OOO 


0.000 


0.001 


0.003 


0.000 


0.00 


-0.005 


-0.000 


1<! 


0.001 


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0.002 


0.000 


0.00 


-0. ooi 


-0.000 


0.001 


0.000 


0.003 


0.000 


0.000 


-O.OOt 


-0.000 


IJ 


0. Oo>i 


0.000 


0.001 


0.000 


0. 000 


-O.OOi 


-O.OuO 


0.001 


0.000 


0.002 


0.000 


0.001 


-0.004 


-0.000 


14 


0.001 


0.000 


0.001 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.003 


-0.00 


0.001 


0.001 


0.002 


0.000 


0.001 


-0.004 


-0.000 


15 


0.001 


0.000 


0.001 


0.000 


0. ooo 


-0.003 


-O.OuO 


0.001 


0.000 


0.002 


0.000 


0.00 1 


-0.004 


-0.000 


16 


0.001 


0.001 


O.002 


0. 000 


0.000 


-0.00'+ 


-0. 000 


0.001 


0.000 


0.001 


0. 000 


0.001 


-0.003 


-0.000 


17 


0. uOl 


0.001 


0. 002 


0. 00 


0.000 


-0. 004 


-U.OOO 


0.001 


0.000 


0.000 


O.OOO 


0.000 


-0.001 


0.000 


Id 


0.000 


C.OOl 


0.0vj2 


0.00 


0.00 


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-0.000 


0.001 


0.000 


0.000 


J. 000 


0.000 


-0.001 


0.000 


ly 


0.000 


0. Ooo 


O.OOl 


0. UOO 


0.000 


-0.002 


0.000 


0.001 


0.000 


0.000 


O.OOO 


0.00 


-0.001 


0.000 


2J 


0. coo 


0. 000 


O.OOO 


0. 000 


O.OOO 


-0.001 


0.000 


O.OOu 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.001 


0.000 


21 


0.00 


0.000 


0. 000 


0.000 


0.00 


-0.001 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


-O.OOl 


0.000 


22 


0.000 


O.OOi 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


-O.OOl 


0. 000 


O.OOO 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.001 


0.000 


23 


0-000 


0-002 


0. 000 


0.000 


0.0 


-0.002 


0.000 


0.000 


0.001 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.002 


0.000 


24 


0.000 


0.002 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.002 


0.000 


0.000 


0.001 


0.000 


0.000 


0.000 


-0.001 


0.000 



Figure 41. Matrix of default initial year traffic distributions and yearly increments. 
The columns labeled "ALL" indicate the daily distribution of all traffic while 
the other columns present the distribution between the trip purposes for an hour. 



147 



TRAFFIC WARRANTS FUR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
MOTORIST COSTS 



PASSENGER CARS 
COMMERCIAL VEHICLES 



FUEL 


OIL 


TREAD WEAR 


$/GALLON 


$/QUART 


$/.00i INCH 


0.40 


0.80 


0.10 


0.30 


0.^0 


0.20 



TOTAL OPERATING COSTS IN DOLL ARS/ 1 t 000 VEHICLE HOURS: 



SPEED 


PASSENGER 


COMMERCIAL 


SPEED 


PASSENGER 


COMMERCIAL 




CARS 


VEHICLES 




CARS 


VEHICLES 


I 


312. 


2266. 


33 


2010. 


6000. 


2 


379. 


2287. 


34 


2070. 


6191. 


3 


439. 


2315. 


35 


2130. 


6387. 


4 


495. 


2355. 


36 


2191. 


6587. 


5 


549. 


2406. 


37 


2253. 


6792. 


6 


601. 


2467. 


38 


2316. 


7001. 


7 


6i>3. 


2536. 


39 


2380. 


7216. 


8 


703. 


2612. 


40 


2445. 


7435. 


9 


753. 


2695. 


41 


2511. 


7659. 


10 


802. 


2784. 


42 


2578. 


7889. 


11 


852. 


2878. 


43 


2646. 


8124. 


12 


901. 


2976. 


44 


2716. 


8365. 


13 


950. 


3078. 


45 


2786. 


8611. 


14 


999. 


3184. 


46 


2858. 


8864. 


15 


1049. 


3294. 


47 


2931. 


9123. 


16 


1098. 


3406. 


48 


3005. 


9388. 


1/ 


1148. 


ii>ZZ. 


49 


3081. 


9661. 


13 


1198. 


3640. 


50 


3158. 


9940. 


19 


1249. 


3760. 


51 


3236. 


10227. 


20 


1300. 


3384. 


52 


3317. 


10522. 


21 


1351. 


4023. 


53 


3398. 


10826. 


ZZ 


1403. 


4166. 


54 


3482. 


11138. 


23 


1455. 


4313. 


55 


3567. 


11459. 


24 


1507. 


4463. 


56 


3654. 


11790. 


25 


1561. 


4618. 


57 


3743. 


12132. 


26 


lol5. 


477 7. 


58 


3834. 


12485. 


27 


1669. 


4939. 


59 


3927. 


12850. 


28 


1724. 


5106. 


60 


4022. 


13228. 


29 


1730. 


5277, 


61 


4120. 


13621. 


30 


1836. 


5451. 


62 


4220. 


14028. 


31 


1894. 


5630. 


63 


4322. 


14451. 


32 


1932. 


5813. 


64 


4428. 


14893. 



Figure 42. Matrix of hourly operation costs generated by the 
program using defaults for pavement alignment, vehicle 
composition and unit costs. The default unit costs are shown. 



148 



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— i—i— t—t—t-jr-irsi'V^Lnoom-^rOfMooiT.in^^ 

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149 



APPENDIX B 

Computer Output for the Demonstration Run 
Using Program EAROMAR 



150 



TRAFFIC WARRcNTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 1 OIRECTIJN AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMbEK 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE L 
REHABIL HAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS dXlOO 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





I 


» 


k 


( 





k 








i 




2 


( 


( 


I 





i 





! 


. 




i 


i 


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4 


i 


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i 


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5 


i 


i 


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t 








i 




1 


i 108 


i 595 


t 24 


2 


I 524 


317 


3 


( 1251 


2 


2 


( 108 


i 21 


I 9 


1 


i 








I 139 


2 


3 


( 108 


\ 12 


\ 8 





( 





1 


128 


2 


4 


i 108 


( 4 


( 8 


1 


i 





1 


t 120 


2 


5 


i 108 


( 24 


( 16 


1 i 


t 








i 148 


3 


I 


( 


( 


t 





i 








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2 


( 


6 


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19 


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24 


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1 





TOTAL 


1 


i 113 ) 


I 595 


( 24 


2 ! 


( 543 


32 6 


3 


i 1275 


TOTAL 


2 i 


i 113 


I 22 ) 


9 


1 ] 








) 


144 


TOTAL 


3 


i 113 ) 


12 ) 


i 8 


1 








) 


133 


TOTAL 


4 


( 113 


( 4 1 


I 8 


) 








! 


125 


TOTAL 


5 


( 113 


( 24 


i 16 


1 








) 


, 153 



**• SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YtAR; 1 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE L 
REHABIL ITAT UN 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 ) 


i S 


k 


k 





k 








k 


1 


2 1 


1 


I ) 








k 





) 


k 


1 


3 t 


1 


I ! 


k 





k 








k 


1 


4 1 


s 


k t 








k 





i 


k 


1 


5 i 


] 


k 


k 





k 





1 


k 


2 


1 t 


108 


k 281 1 


k 9 


1 ) 


k 136 


29 





k 534 


2 


2 1 


108 1 


k 35 


k 2 





k 








k 145 


2 


3 1 


108 


k 28 ) 


> 2 





k 








k 138 


2 


4 ) 


> 103 


k 8 t 


k 





k 








k 116 


2 


5 ) 


i 108 


k 56 1 


k 4 


1 


k 





1 


k l&S 


3 


1 t 


i 1 


k 1 


k 


1 


k 





) 


k 


3 


2 ) 


1 


k 1 


k 


! 


k 








k 


3 


3 1 


• t 


k ) 


k a 





k b 








k 


3 


4 1 


1 


k 1 








k 





j 


k 


3 


5 


i 


k 


k 





k 








k 


4 


1 ) 





k j 


k 





k 








k 


« 


2 i 


i 


k 


k 





k 





1 


k 


4 


3 ) 





k 1 


k 


i 


k 








k 


4 


4 


> 


k 


k 


s 


k 





1 


k 


4 


5 ( 


i 1 


k 


k 


1 


k 








k 


5 


1 1 


I 5 1 


k 


k 


( 


k 





( 


k 5 


5 


2 ] 


5 


k t 








k 








k 5 


5 


3 


i 5 


k 


k 





k 








k 5 


5 


4 i 


5 1 


k 1 





) 


k 








k 5 


5 


5 1 


I 5 . 


k 


k 


a 


k 








k 5 


6 


1 i 





k ) 


k 


1 


k 





1 


k 


6 


2 i 


i 1 


k ' 


k 


) 


k 





i 


k 


6 


3 1 


U 


k ) 





) 


k 





s 


k 


6 


4 


( ! 


k 


k 





k 





! 


k 


6 


5 ( 





k 


k 





k 








k 


7 


1 


i 


k 


k 


) 


k 








k 


7 


2 ) 


i 


k ' 1 


k 





k 





( 


k 


7 


3 


k 


k 


k 





k 





1 


k 


7 


4 1 


i 


k ) 


k 





k 





i 


k 


7 


5 


( 


k 


k 





k 








k 


TOTAL 


1 


i 113 


k 281 


I 4 


1 


k 136 


29 





k 539 


TOTAL 


2 ( 


1 113 


k 35 


k 2 


1 


k 








k 150 


TOTAL 


3 ) 


I 113 


k 28 ) 


2 


1 


k 








143 


TOTAL 


4 


i 113 


k 8 


k 


s 


k 





1 


k 121 


TOTAL 


5 ) 


I 113 


k 56 t 


k 4 





k 





) 


k 173 



♦•« SIGNIFIES THAT ROAU CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



151 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 2. DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE E 


OPERATION 




ACCI 


DENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 


TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHABIL ITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


•ei DAYS 


COSTS 




1 







i 





















i 







2 







% 





















) 


I 




3 







$ 





















) 


\ 




4 




























1 


I 




5 




























( 


( 


2 


1 




238 




1821 




68 


8 




1186 


674 


5 ) 


S 3313 


2 


2 




239 




148 




21 


2 




112 


12 


1 


( 520 


2 


3 




240 




88 




24 


2 










) 


<, 352 


2 


4 




240 




28 




24 


2 













I 292 


2 


5 




238 




175 




47 


5 










i 


( 460 


J 


1 































( 


3 


2 




























1 


( 


3 


3 




























i 


( 


3 


4 































( 


3 


5 































\ 


4 


1 































( 


4 


2 































( 


4 


3 































I 


4 


4 































( 


4 


5 































i 


5 


X 




13 




53 




3 







67 


32 





i 136 


5 


2 




13 




3 












5 


5 





( 21 


5 


3 




13 


























( 13 


5 


4 




13 


























( 13 


5 


5 




13 


























( 13 


6f 


1 




























s 


I 


6 


2 































( 


6 


3 































i 


6 


4 

















d 













i 


6 


5 































( 


7 


1 









I 





















i 


7 


2 

























< 


t 


7 


3 































i 


7 


4 































( 


7 


5 




























i 


^ 


TOTAL 


1 




251 




1874 




71 


8 




1253 


706 


5 


i 3449 


TOTAL 


2 




252 




151 




21 


2 




117 


12 5 





( 541 


TOTAL 


3 




253 




88 




24 


2 













( 365 


TOTAL 


4 




253 




28 




24 


2 













( 305 


TOTAL 


S 




251 




175 




47 


5 













( 473 



**« SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 2 DIRtCTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE £ 
KEHABIL ITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS LOSS TIME 

COSTS #X100 COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


I 







i 





















( 


1 


2 







( 





















( 


1 


3 







I 





















( 


1 


4 







6 





















i 


' I 


5 







i 





















( 


2 


1 




238 


I 841 




26 


3 




377 


112 


1 


( 1482 


2 


2 




239 


i 149 




9 


1 













i 397 


2 


3 




240 


1. 142 




8 
















( 390 


2 


4 




240 


t 80 




8 
















( 323 


2 


5 




238 


( 282 




15 


1 










o 


( 535 


3 


1 







( 





















( 


3 


2 







( 


















1 


( 


3 


3 







i 





















( 


3 


4 




i 


i 


















1 


i 


3 


5 







( 


















i 


i 


4 


1 




1 


i 





















I 


4 


2 




1 


( 


















1 


i 


4 


3 







i 


















i 


I 


4 


4 




i 


i 


















i 


( 


4 


5 




1 


i 


















i 


[ 


5 


1 




13 1 


i 












6 





i 


1 19 


5 


2 




13 


) 


















i 


i 13 


5 


3 




13 i 


1 


















1 


i 13 


5 


4 




13 ) 


1 


















1 


i 13 


5 


5 




13 


( 


















s 


13 




1 







i 


















i 







2 




i 


i 


















) 







3 




i 


i 


















) 







4 




) 


i 


















) 







5 




1 





















i 







1 




] 


k 


















i 







2 




) 


( 


















1 


,0 




3 




) 


i a 


















i 







4 







I 


















1 







5 




! 


i 


















i 





TOTAL 


1 




251 1 


841 




26 


3 




383 


112 


1 i 


1501 


TOTAL 


2 




252 1 


( 149 




9 


1 










s 


410 


TOTAL 


3 




253 1 


i 142 




8 













i 


403 


TOTAL 


4 




253 ( 


1 80 




8 













i 


341 


TOTAL 


5 




251 ( 


> 282 




15 


1 










1 


548 



*** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



152 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAI I'^TENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 1 OIRECTION COMaiNED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE £ 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 


LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHABILITATIUN 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 


COSTS 


HJUKS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 




1 







$ 










1 


. 















2 







i 





























3 

















1 


















4 

















1 


















5 

















1 
















2 


1 




216 




876 




33 


3 ) 


660 


346 


3 




1785 


2 


2 




216 




57 




U 


1 













2 84 


2 


3 




216 




40 




10 


1 


S 










266 


2 


4 




216 




12 




8 
















236 


2 


5 




216 




80 




20 


1 ] 













316 


3 


1 

















1 
















3 


2 

















1 
















3 


3 

















1 


• 













3 


4 

















J 
















3 


5 

















OS 













* 


1 

















$ 













4 


2 

















$ 













4 


3 

















$ 













4 


4 














a 


i 
















4 


5 

















i 
















5 


1 




10 












i 


19 


9 







29 


5 


2 




10 












1 













10 


S 


3 




10 












) 













10 


5 


4 




10 












) 













10 


5 


5 




10 












] 













10 


6 


1 

















( 
















6 


2 

















1 
















6 


3 

















i 
















6 


4 

















t 
















6 


5 

















) 
















7 


1 

















) 
















7 


2 

















1 
















7 


3 

















1 
















7 


4 

















1 
















7 


5 

















) 
















TOTAL 


1 




226 




876 




33 


3 1 


679 


35 5 


3 




1814 


TOTAL 


2 




226 




57 




11 


1 < 













2 94 


TOTAL 


3 




226 




40 




10 


1 













2 76 


TOTAL 


4 




226 




12 




8 


1 


i 










246 


TOTAL 


5 




226 




80 




20 


1 t 













326 


MINIMUM COSTS 




226 




12 




8 





( 










246 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 




209 




11 




7 


) 


i 










2 27 


ACCUMULATED 


COSTS 




209 




11 




7 


) 


( 










2 27 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 2 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY . 



MAINTENANCE C 
REHABILITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





1 


t 

































2 


( 

































3 


( 

































4 


t 

































5 


t 































2 


1 


( 476 




2662 




94 


11 




1553 


786 


6 




4795 


2 


2 


( 478 




297 




30 


3 




112 


12 







917 


2 


3 


( 480 




2 30 




32 


2 















7 42 


2 


4 


t 480 




108 




32 


2 















620 


2 


5 


t 476 




457 




62 


6 















9 95 


3 


1 


( 









a 





















3 


2 


( 































3 


3 


i 































3- 


4 


i 































3 


5 


( 































4 


1 


t 































4 


2 


i 































4 


3 


^ 































4 


4 


% 































4 


5 


i 































5 


1 


i 26 




53 




3 







73 


32 







155 


5 


2 


i 26 




3 












5 


5 







34 


5 


■3 


$ 26 




























26 


5 


4 


i 26 




. 























26 


5 


5 


« 26 




























26 


6 


1 


i 































6 


2 


i 









J 





















6 


3 


i 































6 


4 


i' 































6 


5 


S 































7 


1 


{ 































7 


2 


$ 































7 


3 


t 































7 


4 


$ 































7 


5 


i 









U 





















TOTAL 


1 


J 502 




2715 




97 


11 


$ 


1630 


til8 


6 


i 


4950 


TOTAL 


2 


i 504 




300 




30 


3 


i 


117 


12 5 





i 


951 


TOTAL 


3 


$ 506 




230 




32 


2 


i 











$ 


768 


TOTAL 


4 


i 506 




108 




32 


2 


i 











i 


646 


TOTAL 


5 


$ 502 




457 




62 


6 


$ 


<. 








% 


1021 


MINIMUM COSTS 


$ 506 




108 




32 


2 


$ 











i 


646 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 


$ 433 




92 




27 


2 


i 











$ 


553 


ACCUMULATED 


COSTS 


i 642 




103 




34 


2 


i 











$ 


780 



153 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FQR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REgUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 3 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE MAINTENANCE £ 


OPERATION 


ACCI 


DENTS 


LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 


TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY REHABILITATION 




COSTS 


COSTS 


*X100 


COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 


COSTS 


1 


1 


[ 


$ 





$ 


$ 





) 


I . 


1 


2 


( 







$ 0. 





i 





) 


i 


1 


3 


( 







t 





1 





1 


t 


i 


4 i 


i 







S 





i 





) 


I 


1 


5 


i 







i 





i 





i 


1 


2 


I 


i 520 




4218 


$ 172 


20 


i 1004 


879 


7 1 


( 5914 


2 


2 


( 528 




383 


t 48 


5 ) 


i 93 


94 


1 


i 1052 


2 


3 ! 


( 529 




318 


i 64 


7 


( 





1 


I 911 


2 


4 


t 534 




2 52 


$ 64 


7 


i 








t 850 


2 


5 


i 520 




627 


t 126 


14 


( 





1 


( 1273 


3 


1 


( 







i 





( 





1 


^ 


i 


2 ( 


i 







i 





i 





1 


I 


i 


3 i 


i 







( 


i 


( 








t 


3 


4 


i 







S 





( 





i 


> 


3 


5 


i 







$ 





i 





1 


1 


4 


1 


S 







$ 





I 





1 


I 


4 


2 ) 


[ 







$ 





( 





i 


i 


4 


3 1 


k 







« 





i 





i 


( 


* 


4 1 


I 







$ 


1 


( 





s 


k 


4 


5 


i 







$ 





i 





1 


( 


5 


1 


t 18 




75 


i 4 





( 13 


15 


) 


t no 


5 


2 ) 


( 18 




2 


$ 





1 1 


1 


1 


i 21 


5 


3 


( 18 







i 


1 


( 





1 


i 18 


S 


, 4 ! 


( 18 







i 





1 








I IB 


5 


5 


6 18 







i 





i 





1 


1 18 


6 


1 


( 







$ 





t 





1 


( 


6 


2 


i 







i 





( 





) 


1 


6 


3 


t 







$ 





( 





( 


( 


6 


4 


1 







$ 





i 





) 


I 


6 


5 


( 







( 


1 


( 





( 


^ 


7 


1 


( 







$ 


) 


( 





1 


I 


7 


2 ) 


I 







$ 


) 


I 





) 


i 


7 


3 


i J 







$ 





i 





1 


i 


7 


4 < 


( 







i 





i 





) 


( 


7 


5 


t 







$ 





( 





i 


i 


TUTAL 


1 


S 538 




4293 


i 176 


20 


S 1017 


894 


7 i 


I 6024 


TOTAL 


2 


( 546 




385 


i 48 


5 1 


( 94 


95 





i 1073 


TOTAL 


3 


i 547 




318 


i 64 


7 1 


i 





i 


( 929 


TOTAL 


4 


k 552 




252 


$ 64 


7 


t 





t 


( 868 


TOTAL 


5 


( 538 




627 


S 126 


14 


1 





) 


I 1291 



*** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 3 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 
NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CAThGURY 



MAINTENANCE t 
REHABILIIAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 


( 







I 





( 








t 


1 


2 


e 







i 





( 








t 


1 


3 


( 







( 





( 








( 


1 


4 


( 







i 





i 








( 


1 


5 i 


( 







( 





( 








i 


2 


1 


i 520 




2231 


( 66 


7 


( 1039 


373 


3 


( 3856 


2 


2 


I 528 




448 


( 24 


2 


( 12 


11 





( 1012 


2 


3 


( 529 




416 


i 24 


2 


k 








( 969 


2 


4 


( 534 




360 1 


( 24 


2 


i 








( 918 


2 


5 


( 520 




820 


I 47 


5 


I 








i 1387 


3 


I 


( 







S 





k 








( 


3 


2 


( 







( 





( 








( 


3 


3 


I 







i 





( 





! 


( 


3 


4 


k 




S 


I 





( 





1 


( 


3 


5 


( 




1 


S 





( 





! 


( 


4 


1 


t 







i 





t 





) 


( 


4 


2 ) 


i 




i 








i 





) 


( 


4 


3 J 


i 




) 


t 





i 





i 


1 


4 


4 1 


i 




( 





1 


i 





i 


i 


4 


5 


i 




( 


t 


i 


i 





t 


i 


5 


1 


i 18 




11 ) 


1 





t 16 





1 


i 46 


5 


2 


i 18 




2 1 





1 


i 





i 


20 


5 


3 ) 


( 18 




] 





1 


i 





s 


i 18 


5 


4 


i 18 




i 





1 


i 





i 


18 


i 


5 1 


i 18 




) 





s 


i 





1 


18 


6 


1 i 


i 




i 





i 








) 





6 


2 ) 


I 




) 





1 








» 





6 


3 J 


I 




] 





) 








i 





6 


4 i 







) 





i 








1 





6 


5 i 


i 




) 





i 








1 





7 


i i 


. 




) 





1 








t 





7 


2 ) 


i 




1 





1 








1 





7 


3 ( 


i 




1 





( 








1 





7 


4 ) 


i 




) 





i 








t 





7 


5 ( 







) 





) 








1 





TOTAL 


1 


I 538 




2242 i 


67 


7 1 


1055 


373 


3 i 


3902 


TOTAL 


2 ( 


546 




450 J 


24 


2 « 


12 


11 


i 


1032 


TOTAL 


3 ) 


547 




416 1 


24 


2 ) 








t 


987 


TOTAL 


4 t 


I 552 




360 1 


24 


2 1 








s 


936 


TOTAL 


5 1 


i 538 




820 1 


47 


5 1 








s 


1405 



*** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



154 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALrSIS YEAR: "t DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE C 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHAB 


LITATIQN 




CUSTS 




COSTS 


l»X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 




1 






































2 






































3 






































4 






































5 














J 





















2 


1 




U2& 




10452 




42 


49 




2391 


2151 


17 




14389 


2 


2 




1150 




8 34 




124 


14 















2108 


Z 


3 




1152 




834 




160 


18 















2146 


2 


4 




1171 




744 




164 


19 















2079 


2 


5 




1126 




1649 




316 


37 















3091 


3 


1 




































3 


2 




































3 


3 




































3 


4 














Q 





















3 


5 




































<t 


1 




































4 


2 




































4 


3 




































4 


4 




































4 


5 




































5 


1 




19 




105 




5 







20 


19 







149 


5 


2 




19 




2 























21 


5 


3 




19 









2 


















21 


5 


4 




19 




























19 


5 


5 




19 









4 


















23 




1 






































2 






































3 






































4 






































5 






































1 






































2 






































3 






































4 






































5 







$ 





























TOTAL 


1 




1145 


i 


10557 




42 5 


49 




2411 


2170 


17 




14538 


TOTAL 


2 




1159 


% 


836 




124 


14 















2129 


TOTAL 


3 




1171 


I 


834 




162 


18 















2167 


TOTAL 


4 




1190 


$ 


744 




164 


19 















2098 


TOTAL 


5 




1145 


$ 


1649 




m 


37 















3114 



*»» SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REgUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 4 OIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE S 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 


TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHA8IL ITAT ION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 


COSTS 




1 































( 




2 































( 




3 































i 




4 































t 




5 














J 
















6 


2 


1 




1126 




5911 




177 


20 




259 1 


1057 


7 


( 9805 


2 


2 




1167 




llo5 




130 


15 




65 


49 





I 2527 


2 


3 




1152 




1066 




60 


7 













t 2278 


2 


4 




1171 




1044 




60 


7 













S 2275 


2 


5 




U26 




2108 




118 


13 













t 3352 


3 


1 































( 


3 


2 














a 


J 













% 


3. 


3 































\ 


3 


4 































( 


3 


5 































t 


4 


1 














u 
















( 


4 


2 































( 


4 


3 































t 


4 


4 































I 


4 


5 














J 
















\ 


5 


1 




19 




21 




1 







21 








t 62 


5 


2 




19 




4 




1 







4 


3 





I 28 


5 


3 




19 




2 





















! 21 


5 


4 




19 

















Q 





i 


( 19 


5 


5 




19 




4 


















J 


\ 23 


6 


I 































\ 


6 


2 































I 


6 


3 




























i 


<• 


6 


4 































I 


6 


5 




























J 


\ 


7 


1 































( 


7 


2 




























1 


\ 


7 


3 































( 


7 


4 




























) 


( 


7 


5 































I 


TOTAL 


1 




1145 




5932 




17d 


20 




2612 


105 7 


7 


I 9867 


TOTAL 


2 




1186 




1169 




131 


15 




69 


52 


J 


t 2555 


TOTAL 


3 




1171 




10o8 




60 


7 










! 


\ 2299 


TOTAL 


4 




1190 




1044 




60 


7 










) 


\ 22 94 


TOTAL 


5 




1145 




2112 




118 


13 










) 


i 3375 



*•* SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TKAFFtC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 3 OIRECTIQN CQHSINEO 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE t 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMbER 


CATEGORY 


REHAB 


LITATIGN 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOORS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 




































1 


2 














0. 





















1 


3 




































1 


4 




































1 


5 




































2 


1 




1040 




6449 




za 


27 




2043 


1252 


10 




9770 


i 


2 




1056 




831 




72 


7 




105 


105 







2064 


Z 


3 




I05a 




734 




ua 


9 















1880 


2 


4 




106a 




6U 




88 


9 















1768 


2 


5 




1040 




1447 




173 


19 















2660 


3 


1 




































3 


2 




































3 


3 




































3 


4 




































3 


5 




u 































4 


1 




































If 


2 




































4 


3 




































4 


4 




































4 


5 




































5 


1 




36 




86 




5 







29 


15 







156 


S 


2 




36 




4 












1 


1 







41 


5 


3 




3o 




























36 


5 


4 




36 




























36 


5 


5 




36 




























36 


6 


1 














a 





















6 


2 




































6 


3 




































6 


4 




































6 


3 




































7 


1 




































7 


2 




































7 


3 




































7 


4 




































7 


5 




































TOTAL 


1 




1076 




6535 




243 


27 


$ 


2072 


1267 


10 




9926 


TOTAL 


2 




1092 




835 




72 


7 


$ 


106 


106 







2105 


TOTAL 


3 




1094 




734 




88 


9 


I 













1916 


TOTAL 


4 




1104 




612 




88 


9 


$ 













1804 


TOTAL 


5 




1076 




1447 




173 


19 


i 













2696 


MINIMUM CUSTS 




1104 




612 




88 


9 


i 













1804 


UISCOUNTEO 


CUSTS 




876 




485 




69 


9 


$ 













1432 


ACCUMULATED COSTS 




1518 




588 




103 


11 


.$ 













2212 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 4 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE t 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


KEHAblL ITAT lUN 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 


$ 


















1 
















1 


2 


$ 


















$ 
















1 


3 


$ 


































1 


4 




































1 


5 




































2 


1 




2252 




16363 




597 


69 




4982 


3208 


24 




24194 


2 


2 




2317 




1999 




254 


29 




o5 


49 







4635 


2 


3 




2304 




1900 




220 


25 















4424 


2 


4 




2342 




1788 




224 


26 















4354 


2 


5 




2252 




3757 




434 


50 















6443 


3 


1 




































3 


2 




































3 


3 




































3 


4 




































3 


5 




































4 


1 







i 





























4 


2 







S 





























4 


i 







i 





























4 


4 




































4 


5 




































5 


1 




38 




126 




6 







41 


19 







211 


5 


2 




38 




6 




1 







4 


3 







49 


5 


3 




38 




2 




2 


















42 


5 


4 




38 




























38 


5 


5 




38 




4 




4 







■• 










46 


6 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 




































6 


4 




































6 


5 






































1 






































2 






































3 






































4 






































5 




































TOTAL 


1 




2290 




16489 




603 


69 




5023 


3227 


24 




24405 


TOTAL 


2 




2355 




2005 




255 


29 




69 


52 







4634 


TOTAL 


3 




2342 




1902 




ZiZ 


25 















4466 


TOTAL 


4 




2380 




1788 




224 


25 




U 










4392 


TOTAL 


5 




2290 




3761 




438 


50 







0. 







64 89 


MINIMUM CUSTS 




2380 


i 


1788 




224 


26 















4392 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 




1749 


i 


1314 




164 


26 















3228 


ACCOMULATEC 


COSTS 




3267 


i 


1902 


$ 


267 


37 















5440 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOK PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REUUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 5 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE t 
REHABIL ITATIJN 



QPERATIUN 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS LOSS TIME 

COSTS #X100 COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





1 


i 


» 


i 





I 








I 




2 


( 


( 


( 





( 








( 




3 ) 


( 


( 


i 





t 








I 




4 1 


( ] 


( 


i 





i 








i 




5 


I 


( 


I 





i 








i 


2 


I 


( 2304 


I 23549 


i 942 


no 


I 4793 


4714 


33 


i 31588 


2 


2 


( 2531 


( 2382 


I 319 


37 


i 616 


543 





t 5848 


2 


3 


i 2476 


i 2102 


I 382 


44 


t 





J 


I 4960 


2 


4 1 


i 2529 


( 2000 1 


1 400 


47 


( 








I 4929 


2 


5 ) 


( 2304 


( 3986 ( 


I 724 


85 


I 





1 


I 7014 


3 


1 i 


( 56 1 


( 42 1 


2 





S 77 


55 


! 


i 177 


3 


2 


i 56 


I 14 J 


i 2 





i 





1 


I 72 


3 


3 1 


( 56 


I 14 1 


2 





( 








i 72 


3 


4 


1 56 ] 


i 


I 





I 








I 56 


3 


5 ] 


t 56 ] 


i 28 ) 


I 4 





S 








I 88 


4 


1 


( 10548 


t 86331 


( 3282 


386 


t 39857 


23590 


142 


i 140018 


4 


2 


i 13149 


i 11838 1 


I 1179 


138 


i 8156 


7037 


15 


I 34322 


4 


3 


1 10681 1 


I 6326 


i 1230 


14* 


i 3996 


4018 


14 


fc 22233 


4 


4 1 


I 10947 J 


I 5380 ! 


fc 1292 


152 


( 4936 


4908 


26 


t 22555 


4 


5 ! 


I 10548 J 


I 12390 


I 2409 


283 


I 7826 


7869 


29 


t 33173 


5 


1 ) 


t 18 t 


i 114 ) 


6 





i 21 


23 


1 


i 159 


5 


2 ) 


( 18 1 


i 1 


i 1 





i 





1 


I 20 


5 


3 t 


i 18 1 


i 1 


2 





1 





1 


i 20 


S 


4 1 


k 18 


. i 


i 





I 





i 


i 18 


5 


5 


i 18 1 


i i 


t 4 





i 








i 22 


6 


1 ) 


( ) 


I 


t 





i 





1 


i 


6 


2 ) 


1 1 


i t 








( 





1 


t 


6 


3 4 


t 1 





i 





I 





) 


t 


6 


4 1 


i i 


. 1 








i 





1 


t 


6 


5 ) 


( ) 


1 


i 





i 





! 


i 


7 


1 t 


1 t 


) 





J ) 


i 





1 


i 


7 


2 ) 


) ) 


1 i 


I 





i 





1 





7 


3 t 


I i 


i ) 


I 3 





i 





1 


i 


7 


4 i 


i i 


) 


t 





i 





1 


i 


7 


5 ( 


i 


i i 








i 





1 


i 


TOTAL 


L 


( 12926 1 


i 110036 ) 


I 4232 


496 


f 44748 


28382 


175 


t 171942 


TOTAL 


2 t 


i 15754 1 


I 14235 ) 


1501 


175 


i 8772 


7580 


15 


I 40262 


TOTAL 


3 i 


( 13231 ) 


i 8442 1 


I 1616 


188 


i 3996 


4018 


14 


t 27285 


TOTAL 


4 


( 13550 1 


! 7380 i 


( 1692 


199 


i 4936 


4908 


26 


t 27558 


TOTAL 


S 1 


I 12926 1 


i 16404 J 


I 3141 


368 


( 7826 


7869 


29 


I 40297 



•*♦ SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REOUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR! 5 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE X 
REHABILITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS «X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



¥ 



I 


1 


( 


t 


i 





( 








( 


1 


2 


i 


i 1 








i 








( 


1 


3 1 


i 


( 


k 





> 








I 


1 


4 1 


i 


( 1 








i 








( 


1 


5 


( 


t 


i 





i 








I 


2 


1 


( 2304 


t 15378 


i 465 


54 


i 6853 


3234 


19 


( 25000 


2 


2 


I 2505 


I 2898 


( 147 


17 


t 328 


240 





( 5878 


2 


3 


( 2476 


i 2624 


i 156 


18 


I 








( 52 56 


2 


4 


( 2529 


i 2556 


i 152 


17 


( 








I 5237 


2 


5 


( 2304 


i 4976 


fc 295 


34 


I 








( 75 75 


3 


1 


( 56 


t 143 


( 7 





I 5233 


1448 


5 


( 5439 


3 


2 


t 56 1 


( 68 1 


I 6 





( 996 


32 


1 


( 1126 


3 


3 


i 56 ( 


I 42 


i 6 





I 64 


84 





t 168 


3 


4 1 


I 56 ) 


t 20 


I 4 


1 


i 





1 


> 80 


3 


S 


( 56 


I 84 1 


i 12 


1 


( 128 


168 





t 280 


4 


I 


( 10548 


I 62008 J 


I 1897 


223 


i 27259 


14208 


83 


I 101722 


4 


2 


( 11578 i 


i 11412 


t 531 


62 


I 4455 


2353 


8 


I 27975 


4, 


3 1 


I 10661 


i Si>08 


t 670 


78 


( 3884 


1964 


7 


( 23843 


4 


4 


i 10947 


t 7836 


( 736 


86 1 


[ 5528 


2520 


14 


i 25047 


4 


5 


( 10548 


t 168 59 ) 


I 1312 


154 


fc 7607 


3345 


14 


i 36325 


5 


1 


( 18 t 


t 21 


I 1 


i 


i 21 








1 61 


5 


2 


i 18 


i 4 ] 








( 





1 


) 22 


5 


3 


( 18 ] 


i 2 1 


t 


1 


i 





! 


I 20 


5 


4 ) 


( 18 


i 1 





j 








1 


i 18 


5 


5 1 


( 18 1 


( 4 ) 


t 





i 





j 


I 22 


6 


1 ) 


( 


i 1 


( 











1 


( 


6 


2 


( ) 


i 1 


( 


1 


1 





i 


k 


6 


3 ) 


( 1 


i i 





1 








) 


I 


6 


4 1 


i 


i 1 


i 


1 


( 





) 


1 


6 


5 I 


i ] 


i i 


> 


i 








1 


t 


7 


1 j 


i 


i 1 


t 


) 








1 


( 


7 


2 I 


( 


I 1 


i 





I 





i 


I 


7 


3 « 


( 


1 i 


( 


1 


i 





i 


( 


7 


4 i 


i 


i i 





1 


1 





i 





7 


5 1 


( i 


i 1 


i 


) 


i 





( 





TOTAL 


1 


( 12926 


t 77550 


S 2370 


277 1 


39376 


18890 


108 ) 


132222 


TOTAL 


2 


I 14157 ) 


i 14382 ] 


( 684 


79 


t 5779 


2923 


9 ) 


I 35002 


TOTAL 


3 


I 13231 ] 


I 11276 ) 


832 


96 ) 


3948 


2048 


7 i 


29287 


TOTAL 


4 


i 13550 


i 10412 


I 892 


103 


i 5528 


2620 


14 1 


i 30382 


TOTAL 


5 


( 12926 1 


i 21923 


1 1619 


189 ) 


7735 


4014 


14 ) 


I 44203 



**• SIGNIFIES THAT ROAO CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



157 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRIt^G REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 6 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE £ 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMbER 


CATEGORY 


REHAB IL HAT 1Q,M 




COSTS 




COSTS 


KXlOO 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 




292 




2445 


i 


66 


7 


$ 


6130 


1871 


7 




8933 


1 


2 




294 




142 




19 


2 


$ 


114 


80 







569 


I 


3 




293 




120 




24 


2 















437 


1 


4 




294 




104 




24 


2 















422 


1 


5 




292 




238 




47 


5 















5 77 


Z 


1 




3632 




41281 




1650 


194 




8249 


8402 


53 




54812 


i 


2 




4227 




4604 




582 


68 




1602 


1411 


2 




11015 


2 


3 




386B 




3752 




05 8 


77 















82 78 


2 


4 




4115 




3680 




72 8 


85 















85 23 


2 


5 




3632 




7136 




1251 


147 










1 




12019 


3 


I 




112 




93 




5 







910 


260 







1120 


i 


2 




112 




42 




6 


















160 


3 


3 




112 




42 




6 


















160 


J 


4 




112 




28 




4 


















144 


3 


5 




112 




83 




11 


1 















206 


tt 


I 




































't 


2 




































4 


3 




































4 


4 




































4 


5 




































5 


I 




16 




114 




6 







21 


23 







157 


5 


2 




16 




5 




1 







5 


5 







27 


S 


3 




16 









2 


















18 


5 


4 




16 























a 




16 


S 


5 




16 









4 


















20 


6 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 














■ 





















6 


4 




































6 


5 






































1 






































2 














u 























3 






































4 






































5 




































TOTAL 


1 




4052 




43933 




172 7 


201 




15310 


10556 


60 




6S022 


TOTAL 


2 




4649 




4793 




608 


70 




1721 


1496 


2 




11771 


TOTAL 


3 




42S9 




39 14 




690 


79 















8893 


TOTAL 


4 




4537 




3812 




756 


87 















9105 


TOTAL 


5 




4052 




7457 


$ 


1313 


153 










1 




12822 



*»« SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 6 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLUSUKE 


MAINTENANCE t. 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 


TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHA6IL ITAT ION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 


COSTS 


1 


1 




292 




885 


i 


24 


2 


$ 


654 


314 


1 


$ 1855 


1 


2 




294 




202 


S 


8 







75 


54 





$ 5 79 


1 


3 




293 




146 




3 
















$ 447 


1 


4 




294 




128 




8 
















» 430 


1 


5 




292 




290 




IS 


1 













$ 597 


2 


1 




3632 




26068 




605 


94 




11993 


5927 


32 


% 42498 


2 


2 




4126 




5U58 




270 


31 




515 


375 





$ 9969 


2 


3 




3868 




4518 




280 


32 













$ 8666 


2 


4 




4115 




4552 




280 


32 













$ 8947 


2 


5 




3632 




3592 




532 


62 













% 12756 


3 


1 




112 




316 




16 


1 




13628 


3912 


14 


$ 14072 


3 


2 




112 




147 




15 


I 




2805 


93 5 


3 


$ 3079 


3 


3 




112 




134 




16 


1 




996 


514 


1 


i 1258 


3 


4 




112 




104 




12 


1 




60 


108 





» 288 


3 


5 




112 




267 




31 


3 




1991 


102 7 


2 


% 2401 


4 


1 































$ 


4 


2 































i 


4 


3 































$ 


4 


4 































$ 


4 


5 































$ 


5 


1 




16 




18 




1 







28 


3 





t 63 


5 


2 




16 




3 












1 








S 20 


5 


3 




16 


























$ 16 


5 


4 




16 


























i 16 


5 


5 




16 


























t 16 


6 


1 































i 


6 


2 































$ 


6 


3 































i 


6 


4 































i 




5 































$ 




1 































$ 




2 































i 




3 































t 




4 































i 




5 































$ 


TOTAL 


1 




4052 




27287 




846 


97 




26303 


10156 


47 


t 58488 


TOTAL 


2 




4548 




5410 




293 


32 




3396 


1364 


3 


$ 13647 


TOTAL 


3 




4289 




4798 




304 


33 




996 


514 


1 


t 10387 


TOTAL 


4 




4537 




4784 




300 


33 




60 


108 





$ 9681 


TOTAL 


5 




4052 




9149 


S 


578 


66 




1991 


102 7 


2 


i 15770 



*»* SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT 6E OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



158 



TRAFFIC WAKRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAl^EMEMTS REgUIKlNG REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 5 OIRECTIUN CQMdINtD 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE £ 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHABIL ITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 OAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 












S 
























1 


2 




































1 


3 




































1 


4 




































1 


5 




































2 


1 




4608 




33927 




140 7 


164 




11646 


7948 


52 




55588 


2 


2 




5036 




5280 




4o6 


54 




944 


78 3 







11726 


2 


3 




4952 




4726 




538 


62 















10216 


2 


4 




5058 




4556 




552 


54 















10156 


2 


5 




4608 




8962 




1019 


119 















14539 


3 


1 




112 




185 




9 







5310 


1503 


6 




56 16 


3 


2 




112 




82 




8 







996 


32 


1 




1198 


3 


3 




112 




55 




8 







64 


84 







240 


3 


4 




112 




20 




4 


















136 


3 


5 




112 




112 




16 


1 




128 


158 







368 


4 


1 




21096 




148339 




5179 


609 




67126 


37798 


225 




241740 


4 


2 




24727 




23250 




1710 


200 




12611 


9400 


23 




62298 


4 


3 




21362 




14934 




1900 


2ZZ 




7880 


5982 


21 




450 76 


4 


4 




21894 




13216 




202 8 


238 




10464 


7523 


40 




47502 


4 


5 




21096 




29249 




3 721 


437 




15433 


11715 


43 




69499 


5 


1 




36 




135 




7 







42 


23 







2 20 


5 


2 




35 




5 




1 


















42 


5 


3 




36 




2 




2 


















40 


5 


4 




36 




























36 


5 


5 




36 




4 




4 


















44 


b 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 




































6 


4 




































6 


5 




































7 


1 




































7 


2 




































7 


3 




































7 


4 




































7 


5 




































TOTAL 


1 




25852 




18 75 85 


$ 


6602 


773 




84124 


47272 


283 




304164 


TOTAL 


2 




29911 




28617 


$ 


2185 


254 




14551 


10503 


24 




'■ 75264 


TOTAL 


3 




26462 




19718 


$ 


2448 


284 




7944 


6066 


21 




56572 


TOTAL 


4 




27100 




17792 


s 


2584 


302 




10464 


7528 


40 




57940 


TOTAL 


5 




25352 




38327 


$ 


4760 


557 




15561 


11883 


43 




84500 


MINIMUM COSTS 




26568 




19510 


$ 


2456 


28t> 




7880 


~598 2 


21 




56414 


UISCOUNTEU 


COSTS 




18081 




13278 


s 


1671 


286 




5353 


5982 


21 




38394 


ACCUMULATEU COSTS 




21348 




15180 


$ 


1938 


323 




5363 


5982 


21 




43834 



TRAFFIC WARRfcNTS FOR PREMIUM (S^AVEMENTS REgUlRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 6 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE £ 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


PULLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHABILITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


*X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 


$ 584 




3330 


$ 


90 


9 




5784 


2185 


8 


i 


10788 


1 


2 


S 588 




344 




27 


2 




189 


134 





$ 


1148 


1 


3 


$ 586 




266 




32 


2 















8 34 


1 


4 


i 588 




232 




32 


2 















8 52 


1 


5 


t 584 




528 




62 


6 















1174 


2 


1 


$ 7264 




57349 




2455 


233 




20242 


14329 


85 




97310 


2 


2 


$ 8353 




9662 




852 


99 




2117 


1786 


2 




20984 


2 


3 


i 7736 




8270 




938 


109 















15944 


2 


4 


$ 8230 




8232 




1008 


117 















17470 


2 


5 


* 7264 




15728 




1783 


209 










1 




24775 


3 


1 


$ 224 




409 




21 


1 




14538 


4172 


14 




15192 


3 


2 


i 224 




189 




21 


1 




2805 


935 


3 




3239 


3 


3 


$ 224 




176 




ZZ 


1 




996 


514 


1 




1413 


3 


4 


* 224 




132 




16 


1 




60 


108 







4 32 


3 


5 


t 224 




350 




42 


4 




1991 


1027 


2 




2607 


4 


1 


$ 































4 


2 


$ 































4 


3 


$ 































4 


4 


S 































4 


5 


■t 































5 


I 


i 32 




132 




7 







49 


26 







2 20 


5 


2 


t 32 




8 




1 







6 


5 







47 


5 


3 


$ 32 









2 


















34 


5 


4 


$ 32 




























32 


5 


5 


$ 32 









4 


















36 


6 


1 


* 































6 


2 


$ 































6 


3 


$ 































6 


4 


$ 































6 


s 


t 































7 


1 


$ 































7 


2 


$ 































7 


3 


t 































7 


4 


$ 































7 


5 


i 































TOTAL 


1 


i 8104 




71220 




2573 


298 




41ol3 


20712 


107 




123510 


TOTAL 


2 


» 9197 




10203 




901 


102 




5117 


2860 


5 




25418 


TOTAL 


3 


t 8578 




8712 




994 


112 




995 


514 


1 




19280 


TOTAL 


4 


$ 9074 




8596 




1056 


120 




60 


108 







16785 


TOTAL 


5 


i 8104 




16505 




1891 


219 




1991 


102 7 


3 




28592 


MINIMUM COSTS 


$ 8580 




86 34 




986 


112 




50 


108 







18260 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 


$ 5406 




5440 




621 


112 




37 


108 







11506 


ACCUMULATED COSTS 


t 26754 




20520 




2559 


435 




5400 


6090 


21 




55340 



159 



IKAFFIC WARREMTS FOR PKtMlUM PAVEMENTS REQUtRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 7 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY CLOSURE 
NUMBER CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE L 
REHABIL ITAT UN 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS 0X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



I 


1 




1560 




15262 


$ 


385 


45 




39208 


11318 


39 1 


56415 


1 


2 


$»*** 


***** 




184 




37 


4 










) 


********* 


1 


3 




1589 




902 




134 


15 




196 


240 


( 


t 28 21 


1 


4 




1609 




736 




143 


17 










i 


i 2493 


1 


5 




1560 




1761 




26 1 


30 




382 


468 


» 


( 3964 


2 


1 




3632 




45552 




1835 


215 




9005 


9407 


54 i 


i 60024 


2 


2 


$**** 


***** 




988 




201 


23 










) 


I********* 


2 


3 




3868 




4644 




684 


80 




992 


1214 


1 ) 


i 1018S 


2 


4 




4115 




3952 




604 


94 










1 


( 8871 


2 


5 




3632 




8832 




1300 


152 




1886 


2308 


2 


t 15650 


3 


I 




169 




lie 




9 


1 




2319 


602 


1 i 


I 2615 


3 


2 




169 




74 




10 


1 













t 253 


3 


3 




169 




70 




10 


1 













( 249 


3 


4 




169 




56 




8 













1 


t 233 


3 


5 




169 




139 




19 


2 










1 


I 327 


* 


1 




























( 


[ 


't 


2 




























1 


( 


<> 


3 































( 


4 


4 




























1 


i 


4 


5 




























) 


E 


3 


1 




13 




98 




5 







17 


20 


1 


( 133 


5 


2 


$**** 


***** 























1 


(********* 


5 


3 




13 




2 















2 





i IS 


5 


4 




13 


























I 13 


5 


5 




13 




4 















4 





( 17 


6 


1 































t 


6 


2 




























) 


( 


6 


3 







$ 





















i 


( 


6 


4 







i 





















) 


( 


6 


5 







$ 
























( 


7 


1 







t 





















! 


t 


7 


2 







i 





$ 



















I 


7 


3 







i 





S 



















t 


7 


4 







i 





i 



















( 


7 


5 







% 





i 



















1 


TOTAL 


1 




5374 


i 


61030 


i 


2234 


261 




50549 


21347 


94 


i 119187 


TOTAL :« 


2 


$**#* 


***** 


i 


1246 


i 


243 


28 













(*****«*** 


TOTAL 


3 




5639 


» 


56 18 


i 


828 


96 




1188 


1456 


1 


( 13273 


TOTAL 


4 




590o 


S 


4744 


$ 


96 


111 













( 11610 


TOTAL 


b 


$ 


5374 


i 


10736 


$ 


158J 


184 




2268 


2780 


2 


I 19958 



«** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC HARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REylUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 7 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAlNTENAiiiCE L 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 


TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEG jKY 


REHABILITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 


COSTS 


1 


1 


$ 


1560 




5839 


i 


162 


19 




3023 


1453 


6 


( 10584 


1 


2 




1618 




1224 


$ 


52 


6 




574 


42 7 





i 3468 


1 


3 




1589 




670 


i 


52 


6 













I 2511 


1 


4 




1609 




848 


$ 


52 


6 













( 2509 


1 


5 




1560 




1698 


i 


101 


U 










i 


( 3359 


2 


1 




3632 




27519 


i 


880 


103 




10435 


5006 


26 


( 42466 


2 


2 




4126 




5206 


I 


290 


34 




710 


527 


1 


( 10332 


2 


3 




3868 




4580 


i 


302 


35 




2 


2 





( 8752 


2 


4 




4115 




4o08 


i 


304 


35 













( 9027 


2 


5 




3632 




8710 


i 


574 


67 




3 


3 





t 12919 


3 


1 




169 




1197 


* 


13 


1 




31852 


8744 


23 


( 33231 


3 


2 




169 




469 


$ 


13 


I 




8571 


2594 


5 


( 9222 


3 


3 




169 




17b 


S 


14 


1 




3246 


1216 


1 


( 3607 


3 


4 




169 




136 


$ 


12 


1 




244 


408 





( 561 


3 


5 




169 




355 


$ 


27 


3 




6491 


2431 


2 1 


( 7042 


4 


1 












s 
















J 


( 


4 


2 












$ 
















) 


( 


4 


3 












$ 
















1 


( 


4 


4 












i 



















i 


4 


5 












$ 
















i 


t 


b 


1 




13 




16 


i 


1 







22 


3 





( 52 


5 


2 




13 




2 


i 










1 


1 


) 


i 16 


b 


3 




13 







i 
















1 


I 13 


b 


4 




13 







* 
















J 


i 13 


5 


5 




13 







i 
















i 


13 


& 


1 












i 
















s 


I 


6 


2 












$ 
















) 


1 


6 


3 












$ 
















( 


I 


6 


4 












i 
















i 





6 


5 












i 
















( 







1 












i 
















1 







2 












s 
















i 







3 












$ 
















i 







4 












i 
















) 







5 







i 





i 
















i 





TOTAL 


1 




5374 


I 


345 71 


i 


1056 


123 




45332 


15206 


55 i 


86333 


TOTAL 


2 




5926 


i 


69J1 


i 


355 


41 




9356 


3549 


6 1 


23038 


TOTAL 


3 




5639 


i 


5628 


i 


363 


42 




3248 


1218 


1 ] 


14883 


TOTAL 


4 




5906 


$ 


5592 


$ 


368 


42 




244 


408 


1 


12110 


TOTAL 


5 




5374 


t 


10763 


$ 


702 


81 




6494 


2434 


2 1 


23333 



•** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WAKHtNTS FOR PKEMIUM PAVtMENTS REMUlRlNli REUUCtU MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 8 OIRECTIQM AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE C. 
REHABILITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS LOSS TIME 

COSTS JtXlOO COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



$ 3760 
$#««««««*« 

t 4031 

i 4072 

$ 3760 

$ 3632 
$»»«*##»*♦ 

t 3942 

I 4115 

i 3632 

$ 225 

$ 225 

$ 225 

t 225 

t 225 

i 



S 

$ 

I 

i 10 



10 
10 
10 











34460 

509 

2916 

2036 

5328 

50071 

1065 

o090 

4260 

11432 

131 

113 

104 

92 

208 











82 





$ 





i 





$ 


84744 


i 


1687 


i 


9116 


i 


6388 


% 


16980 



988 


116 




77855 


22944 


103 


12 










340 


40 




1646 


2014 


412 


43 










621 


73 




3007 


3680 


2023 


238 




9670 


10334 


220 


25 










698 


82 




3510 


4300 


880 


103 










1310 


154 




6589 


8072 


13 


1 




4169 


1J94 


16 


1 










16 


1 










16 


1 










32 


3 
















































































4 







12 


17 
























8 


8 
























16 


16 















































































































































78 


2 

4 

54 

5 


10 
3 



























t 117063 

£**««**«** 

t 8933 

i 6520 

% 12716 

i 65396 
$*•♦**•*»♦ 

t 14240 

$ 9255 

i 22963 

I 45 38 

$ 354 

$ 345 

i 333 

i 465 

I 

i 

s 

i 

$ 

$ 108 
(*«*«*«**« 

i 24 

t 10 

i 38 

% 

i 

S 

$ 

I 

i 

i 

i 

i 

i 



TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 



$ 7627 

$****♦♦♦** 
t 8208 
$ 8422 
$ 7627 



3028 355 

339 33 

1054 123 

1308 152 

1963 230 



91706 34389 



5164 6322 



9612 11766 



135 



7 



14 



t 187105 

i 23542 

i 16118 

i 36182 



**♦ SIGNIFIES THAT ROAU CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 8 DIRECTION PH PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE & 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLOTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHABIL ITAT lUN 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 




3760 




14647 




440 


51 




6943 


3353 


14 




25790 


1 


2 




4152 




3205 




144 


16 




1864 


1390 


2 




9365 


1 


3 




3976 




2258 




144 


16 















6378 


1 


4 




4072 




2244 




148 


17 















6464 


I 


5 




3760 




4201 




26 7 


31 















8228 


2 


1 




3632 




29312 




943 


110 




11348 


5493 


26 




45235 


2 


2 




4126 




5337 




310 


36 




893 


666 


I 




10666 


2 


3 




3868 




4708 




324 


38 




26 


42 







8926 


2 


4 




4115 




4724 




324 


38 















9163 


2 


5 




3632 




8954 




616 


72 




49 


79 







13251 


3 


1 




225 




2094 




21 


2 




52928 


1424 7 


37 




55268 


3 


2 




225 




683 




20 


2 




13561 


4185 


8 




14489 


3 


3 




225 




242 




20 


2 




5012 


1826 


2 




5499 


3 


4 




225 




220 




20 


2 




616 


752 







1081 


3 


5 




225 




484 




40 


4 




10024 


3652 


4 




10773 


4 


1 




































4 


2 




































4 


3 




































4 


4 




































4 


5 




































5 


1 




10 




6 




1 







17 


3 







34 


5 


2 




10 




1 












1 


1 







12 


5 


3 




10 




























10 


5 


4 




10 




























10 


5 


5 




10 




























10 


6 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 









.0 


























6 


4 




































6 


5 




































7 


1 




































7 


2 




































7 


3 




































7 


4 




































7 


5 































i 





TOTAL 


1 




7627 


i 


46059 




1405 


163 




71236 


23096 


77 


i 


126327 


TOTAL 


2 




8513 


i 


9226 




474 


54 




16319 


6242 


11 


$ 


345 32 


TOTAL 


3 




8079 


i 


7208 




438 


56 




5038 


1868 


2 


t 


20813 


TOTAL 


4 




8422 


i 


7188 




492 


57 




616 


75 2 





$ 


16718 


TOTAL 


5 




7627 


i 


13639 




923 


107 




10073 


3731 


4 


i 


32262 



*»* SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNuT BE OCCUPIED HITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REuUlRINli REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 7 DIRECTION CCjMBImED 



ACTIVITY 
NUMbER 



CLUSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE t 
REHAfllLlTAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 






3i^o 



i 3178 

$ 3216 

$ 3120 

$ 726"^ 

i 7736 

i 8230 

t 726* 

$ 336 

$ 338 

$ 338 

$ 336 

$ 336 

i 

$ 

t 

i 

i u 

i 26 

i 26 

i Zb 

i 26 

» 

J 

i 

S 

* 

% 

» 

$ 

$ 

$ 



21101 

1408 

1772 

158<. 

3459 

73071 

6194 

9224 

8560 

17!)42 

1315 

543 

248 

192 

494 





114 
2 



54 7 


64 


89 


10 


186 


21 


200 


23 


362 


41 


2715 


318 


49 1 


57 


986 


115 


1108 


129 


1874 


219 


2.Z 


2 


23 


2 


24 


2 


20 


1 


46 


5 


























J 





6 


































































42231 
574 
196 


382 

19440 

710 

994 



1889 

34171 

8571 

3246 

244 

6491 











39 

1 











12771 

42 7 

240 



46 8 

14413 

527 

1216 



2311 

9346 

2 59f 

1216 

408 

2431 











23 

1 

2 



4 























45 





80 
I 
1 

2 

24 
5 
1 

2 























66999 

5332 
5002 
7323 

102490 

18940 

17898 

28569 

35846 

9475 

3856 

794 

7369 











185 

28 
26 

30 













TUTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 



s 


10740 


$**♦*****» 


t 


I 1276 


i 


11812 


$ 


10746 


i 


11565 


I 


6748 


i 


33502 



t 


93601 


i 


8147 


$ 


11246 


i 


10336 


i 


21499 


i 


1030B 


$ 


6U14 


$ 


26634 



i 


3290 


384 


% 


603 


69 


i 


1196 


138 


i 


132 8 


153 


i 


2282 


265 


% 


1326 


153 


I 


773 


153 


% 


3332 


568 



95881 


3o553 


9856 


3549 


4436 


2674 


244 


408 


8762 


5214 


246 


410 


143 


410 


5543 


6500 



149 
6 
2 


4 



205520 

********* 

2B15& 

23720 

43291 



MINIMUM COSTS 

UI SCOUNTEU COSTS 

ACCUMULATED COSTS 







21 



23445 
136 79 
69019 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FUR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 6 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 

NUMbER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGUKY 



MAINTENANCE £ 
REHABIL ITAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 




7520 


i 


49107 




142 8 


167 




84798 


26297 


92 


( 142853 


1 


2 


$♦**♦**«** 




3714 




24 7 


28 




1864 


1390 


2 


i********* 


1 


3 




8007 




5174 




484 


56 




1646 


2014 


2 


( 15311 


1 


4 




8144 




42 60 




560 


65 













( 12984 


1 


5 




752 




9529 




338 


104 




3007 


3580 


4 


( 20944 


2 


I 




7264 




79333 




2966 


348 




21018 


15827 


80 


i 110531 


2 


2 


%********* 




6402 




530 


61 




893 


666 


1 


i********* 


2 


3 




7810 




10798 




1022 


120 




3536 


4342 


5 


i 23165 


2 


4 




8230 




8984 




1204 


141 













i 18413 


2 


5 




7264 




20386 




1926 


226 




5638 


8151 


10 


( 36214 


3 


I 




450 




2225 




34 


3 




57097 


15341 


40 


( 59806 


3 


2 




450 




796 




36 


3 




13551 


4185 


8 


i 14843 


3 


3 




450 




346 




36 


3 




5012 


1826 


2 ) 


S 5844 


3 


4 




450 




312 




36 


3 




616 


752 





( 1414 


3 


5 




450 




692 




72 


7 




10024 


3652 


4 i 


i 112 38 


4 


1 































[ 


4 


2 




























1 


i 


4 


3 




























( 


( 


4 


4 




























J 





4 


5 




























1 


( 


5 


1 




20 




38 




5 







29 


20 


) 


i 142 


5 


2 


i********* 




I 












1 


1 


1 


^********* 


5 


3 




20 




6 












8 


8 





i 34 


5 


4 




20 























1 


i 20 


5 


5 




20 




12 












16 


16 


) 


( 48 


6 


1 




























1 


( 


6 


2 




























( 


i 


6 


3 




























) 


i 


6 


4 




























) 


i 


6 


5 




























i 


> 


7 


1 




























) 





7 


2 




























( 





7 


3 




























1 





7 


4 




























i 





7 


5 




























i 





TOTAL 


1 




15254 




130B03 




443 3 


518 




162942 


57485 


212 


I 313432 


TOTAL 


2 


i*** 


***»■«♦ 




10913 




813 


92 




16319 


6242 


11 J 


^********* 


TOTAL 


3 




16287 




16324 




1542 


179 




10202 


8190 


9 ) 


\ 44355 


TOTAL 


4 




16844 




13576 




1800 


209 




616 


752 


1 


I 32835 


TOTAL 


5 




15254 




30619 




2886 


337 




19685 


15499 


18 ) 


58444 


MINIMUM COSTS 




16501 


i 


13574 




179o 


208 




642 


794 


i 


32513 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 




8915 


$ 


7333 




970 


208 




346 


794 


) 


17565 


ACCUMULATED 


COSTS 




42417 


$ 


33967 




4302 


796 




5889 


7294 


21 1 


85584 



16Z 



TRAFFIC WARRENIS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REuUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 9 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE t 
REHABIL ITATIUN 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS LOSS TIME 

COSTS »X100 COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 


t 67ao 


I 46093 


( 1764 


207 


I 24412 


12942 


54 


k 79049 


1 


2 


l*«****«*« 


t 1097 


( 218 


25 


I 










1 


3 


I 7591 


S 4184 


I 628 


73 


I 








k 12403 


L 


4 


( 8051 


1 4388 


I 872 


102 


\ 








t 13311 


1 


5 


( 6780 


( 7166 1 


1075 


126 


t 








k 15021 


2 


1 


\ 3632 


\ 54712 


( 2215 


260 


\ 10577 


11590 


55 


k 71136 


l 


2 


,««**«**«« 


( 1167 


( 239 


23 


fc 










2 


3 


( 3868 


\ 45 86 


( 694 


31 


\ 








k 9148 


2 


4 


\ 4115 


( 4668 


956 


112 


I 








k 9739 


2 


S 


( 3632 


t 8722 


\ 1319 


155 


b 





1 


k 136 73 


3 


1 1 


( 282 


► 133 


t 18 


2 


fc 6599 


1766 


4 


k 70 32 


3 


2 


( 282 ) 


k 154 


I 21 


2 


I 








k 457 


3 


3 


( 282 1 


( 148 


fc 22 


2 


\ 








k 452 


3 


4 


\ 282 


( 128 


( 20 


2 


( 








k 430 


3 


5 J 


i 282 


( 296 ) 


\ 44 


5 1 


I 








k 622 


4 


1 


\ 1 


I 


I 





( 








k 


4 


2 1 


\ i 


( 1 


I 





\ u 








k 


4 


3 i 


( ] 


\ 


\ 





<, 








k 


4 


4 ] 


1 


\ 1 








k 








k 


4 


S 


( 


( ) 


( 





k 








k 


5 


1 ) 


\ 8 


\ 63 i 


4 





k 9 


14 


] 


k 84 


5 


2 ) 


l*«**««*«* \ 





( 





k 








(**«*«**«* 


5 


3 ) 


\ 8 1 


I i 








k 





1 


k 8 




4 


\ 8 


\ 


\ 





k 








k 8 




5 


i 8 


I 1 


( 





k 








k 8 




1 


( 1 


I 


( 





k 








k 




2 


( 


I 


I 





k 








k 




3 


\ 


\ 


I 





k 








k 




4 ] 


t 


1 1 


\ 





k 








k 




5 


fc 


I \ 


( 





k 








k 




1 J 


1 


1 1 


I 





k 








k 




2 i 


t 


1 1 


I 





k 








k 




3 ) 


\ 


I j 








k 








k 




4 


( 


1 


\ 





k 








k 




5 


( 1 


1 1 








k 








k 


TOTAL 


1 


\ 10702 1 


<, 101001 


I 4001 


469 


I 41597 


26312 


113 


k 157301 


TOTAL 


2 


l«****«*«* ) 


t 2418 1 


473 


55 


k 








(«**•***•« 


TOTAL 


3 


( 11749 


\ 8918 ) 


\ 1344 


156 


k 








k 22011 


TOTAL 


4 1 


( 12456 


I 9184 ) 


1848 


216 


k 








k 23488 


TOTAL 


S 


\ 10702 


1 16184 


I 2438 


286 


k 





1 


k 29324 



*** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR! 9 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE C 
REHABILITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS LOSS TIME 

COSTS (XlOO COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



I 



1 


1 ] 


k 6780 1 


k 26604 


k 898 


105 


k 9152 


4 84 2 


22 


k 43434 


1 


2 i 


k 8359 


( 6586 


k 311 


35 


k 4538 


3354 


6 


k 19894 


1 


3 


k 7591 1 


k 4526 


k 324 


38 


k 








( 12441 


1 


4 ) 


k 8051 


k 4652 


k 316 


37 


k 








k 13019 


1 


5 


k 6780 


k 7752 


k 554 


55 


k 








k 15086 


2 


1 


k 3632 


k 31078 


k 1006 


113 


k 12259 


5982 


25 


( 47975 


2 


2 1 


k 4126 


k 5522 


k 329 


38 


k 1098 


796 


1 


k 110 75 


2 


3 ( 


k 3868 


k 4940 


k 344 


40 


k 100 


104 





k 9252 


2 


4 ) 


k 4115 


k 4960 


k 344 


40 


k 








k 94 19 


2 


5 ) 


k 3532 


k 9395 


k 654 


76 


k 190 


197 





k 13871 


3 


1 


k 282 


k 2652 


k 27 


3 


k 73504 


19942 


48 


k 76565 


3 


2 J 


k 282 


k 1140 


k 28 


3 


k izm 


6560 


12 


k 23573 


3 


3 1 


k 282 


k 354 ) 


k 30 


3 


k 6294 


2406 


2 


k 6960 


3 


4 ) 


k 282 


k 268 


k 24 


2 4 


k 768 


94 8 





k 1342 


3 


5 1 


k 282 


k 708 


k 60 


7 4 


k 12583 


4812 


5 


k 136 38 


4 


1 \ 


1 


k 1 





4 


. 





4 


k 


4 


2 ) 


k 1 


k 1 


k 


4 


k 








k 


4 


3 t 


k t 


k 1 





4 


> 








k 


4 


4 ) 


k j 


k 1 


k 


4 


k 








k 


4 


5 J 


k 


k J 








k 








k 


5 


1 J 


k 8 


k ! 


k 





k 11 


2 





k 19 


5 


2 ] 


8 


k ! 





4 


1 


1 


4 


k 9 


5 


3 4 


k 8 j 


k ) 





4 


k 





4 


k 8 


5 


4 ] 


B 


k 1 





4 





u 


4 


k 8 


5 


5 ) 


> 8 1 


k 














4 


8 


6 


1 t 


1 


k Q 


k 


4 








4 


k 


6 


2 ( 


t 


k 1 





4 











k 


6 


3 ) 


( 


k 1 





4 








4 





6 


4 t 


t 


k 1 





4 








4 





6 


5 S 


1 


k 1 





4 








4 





7 


1 ] 


) 


k ( 





4 








4 


k 


7 


2 1 


) 


k 4 





4 








4 


. 


7 


3 1 


k ( 


t 4 





4 








4 





7 


4 1 


) 


k 4 





4 





u 


4 





7 


5 f 


k 1 


4 





4 








4 





TOTAL 


1 1 


k 10702 1 


k 60334 4 


k 1931 


226 4 


95026 


30 76 8 


95 4 


157993 


TOTAL 


2 < 


k 12775 1 


> 13248 4 


668 


77 4 


27960 


10 72 1 


19 4 


54551 


TOTAL 


3 1 


11749 ) 


k 9820 4 


698 


81 4 


6394 


2510 


2 4 


28661 


TOTAL 


4 4 


> 12456 4 


9880 4 


684 


79 4 


768 


943 


4 


23788 


TOTAL 


5 I 


10702 ) 


k 17855 I 


1268 


148 1 


12773 


5009 


5 4 


42603 



»•• SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



163 



TRAFFIC HAi^RENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEHEMTS REQUIRIilG REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 10 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTEMAiNCE 6 
REHABIL ITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 




10754 




74229 




2947 


346 


$ 22996 


17508 


74 ] 


110926 


1 


2 


$** 


*#»**** 




1894 




374 


44 


$ 





) 


********* 


1 


3 




11739 




6880 




1024 


120 


( 





i 


( 19643 


1 


4 




12996 




7576 




14^6 


176 


$ 





1 1 


22068 


1 


5 




10754 




12058 




1794 


211 


S 





1 ) 


24606 


2 


I 




3632 




59t)57 




2419 


284 


i 11449 


12765 


56 i 


. 77157 


2 


2 


j*« 


******* 




1254 




260 


30 


i 





i 




2 


3 




386B 




4948 




752 


88 


t 





) 


9568 


2 


4 




4115 




5016 




1040 


122 


$ 





1 1 


i 10171 


2 


5 




3632 




9410 




1430 


168 


i 





1 ( 


( 14472 


i 


I 




33a 




187 




24 


2 


i 10374 


2652 


6 1 


i 10923 


3 


2 




33U 




201 




28 


3 


$ 





1 


( 567 


3 


3 




338 




194 




2 8 


3 


i 





1 


( 560 


3 


4 




338 




176 




28 


3 


$ 





1 


i 542 


3 


5 




338 




388 




56 


6 


t 





! 


I 782 


4 


1 




10548 




153607 




5416 


637 


$ 134407 


58214 


206 1 


S 303978 


4 


2 


$»* 


******* 




1987 




531 


62 


$ 1926 


218 5 


7 ( 


.*«******* 


4 


3 




10681 




9428 




1660 


195 


i 5696 


5856 


13 1 


( 27465 


4 


4 




10947 




7948 




2124 


249 


i 7704 


8740 


29 i 


I 28723 


4 


b 




10548 




18465 




3251 


382 


» 11156 


11469 


26 ) 


i 43420 


3 


I 




6 




45 




3 





i 6 


9 


1 


i 60 


b 


2 


$♦♦ 


******* 















S 





1 


I********* 


i 


3 




6 















i 





1 


( 6 


5 


4 




6 















$ 








I 6 


S 


5 




6 















V 





i 


i 6 


b 


1 




















i 





i 


i 


6 


2 




















i 








i 


o 


3 




















t 








( 


„ 


4 




















i 








( 


6 


5 




















i 








I 


7 


I 




















i 








( 


7 


2 




















( 








i 


7 


3 




















$ 








( 


7 


4 




















S 








( 


7 


S 




















i 








I 


TOTAL 


1 




25278 




267725 




10809 


1269 


i 179232 


91148 


342 


i 50304* 


TOTAL 


2 


(^xt******* 




5336 




1193 


139 


1 1926 


2185 


7 


(********* 


TOTAL 


3 




26632 




21450 




3464 


406 


$ 5696 


5856 


13 


B 57242 


TOTAL 


4 




2 84 02 




20716 




4688 


550 


$ 7704 


8740 


31 


( 61510 


TOTAL 


i 




25278 




40321 




6531 


767 


$ 11156 


11469 


28 


( 832 86 



*♦* SIGNIFIES THAT KQAO CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 10 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 
.JUMdER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE L 
REHABIL ITAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS /(XlOO 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HUURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





1 




10754 




42745 




146 8 


172 


( 13834 


7554 


33 


( 68801 




2 




13d92 




11062 




553 


65 


( 9211 


6316 


12 


( 34718 




3 




11739 




7206 




582 


68 


( 








i 19527 




4 




12996 




7836 




568 


66 


i 








i 21400 




5 




10754 




12630 




1020 


120 


i 








( 24404 


2 


1 




3o32 




32729 




1066 


125 


i 13207 


6448 


26 


( 50634 


2 


2 




4126 




5677 




348 


40 


I 1300 


920 


1 


i 11451 


2 


3 




3868 




5136 




364 


42 


i 226 


18l) 





t 9594 


2 


4 




4115 




5184 




364 


42 


( 








( 9663 


2 


5 




3632 




97o8 




692 


81 


( 429 


342 





( 14521 


3 


1 




338 




4340 




32 


3 


( 115008 


31598 


63 


( 119718 


3 


2 




338 




1674 




33 


3 


i 39772 


11407 


18 


( 41817 


3 


3 




338 




810 




3 6 


4 


( 15404 


5410 


6 


( 16538 


3 


4 




338 




412 




32 


3 


( 1352 


1772 


1 


( 2134 


3 


5 




338 




1620 




72 


8 


i 30808 


10820 


13 


( 32838 


4 


1 




10548 




98020 




2647 


311 


( 195996 


56656 


157 


t 307211 


4 


2 




12476 




13922 




724 


85 


( 2971 


1481 


4 1 


I P0093 


4 


3 




10681 




10606 




954 


112 


i 5774 


3126 


7 


I 28015 


4 


4 




10947 




9652 




1068 


125 


i 7176 


3972 


13 


i 28843 


4 


5 




10548 




207 72 




1868 


219 


I 11309 


6122 


14 


( 44497 


5 


1 




5 












1 


8 


2 





I 14 


5 


2 




6 












1 


1 





'1 


( 7 


5 


3 




6 












1 


i 





] 


( 6 


5 


4 




6 












1 


> 





1 


i 6 


5 


5 




6 












! 








1 


i 6 


o 


1 

















) 








) 





6 


2 

















) 








( 





6 


3 

















1 








t 


> 


b 


4 

















) 








> 





6 


5 

















) 








1 





7 


1 

















1 








i 





7 


2 

















1 








1 





7 


3 

















i 








1 





7 


4 

















1 








1 





7 


5 

















1 








1 





TOTAL 


1 




25278 




177634 




5213 


611 i 


338053 


102258 


279 ) 


546378 


TOTAL 


2 




30838 




32335 




1658 


193 1 


53255 


20324 


35 ) 


118086 


TOTAL 


3 




26632 




23758 




1936 


226 1 


21404 


8716 


13 1 


73730 


TOTAL 


4 




28402 




23084 




2032 


236 1 


8528 


5744 


14 1 


62046 


TOTAL 


5 




25278 




44790 




3652 


428 4 


42546 


17284 


27 1 


116Z66 



*** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC HARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REOUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 9 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE t 
REHABIL ITAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS LOSS TIME 

COSTS #X10a COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 


t 13560 




72697 




26o2 


312 




33564 


17784 


76 




122483 


1 


2 


(»»♦*♦*♦*♦ 




76 83 




529 


61 




4638 


3364 


6 


$* 


«*«*•««« 


1 


3 


( 15182 




8710 




952 


111 















24844 


1 


4 


I 16102 




9040 




1188 


139 















26330 


1 


5 


I 13560 




14918 




1629 


191 















30107 


2 


1 


fc 7264 




85790 




3221 


378 




22831. 


17572 


81 




U9111 


Z 


2 


^♦♦♦♦♦**** 




6689 




568 


66 




1098 


79 6 


1 




i 


3 


( 7736 




9526 




1033 


121 




100 


104 







18400 


2 


4 ) 


( 8230 




9628 




1300 


152 















19158 


2 


5 ) 


( 7264 




18117 




1973 


231 




190 


197 


I 




27544 


3 


1 1 


I 564 




2785 




45 


5 




80203 


21708 


52 




83597 


3 


2 


\ 564 




1294 




49 


5 




^Zli.i 


6560 


12 




24130 


3 


3 


t 564 




502 




52 


5 




6294 


2406 


2 




74 12 


3 


4 


I 564 




396 




44 


4 




768 


948 







1772 


3 


5 


\ 564 




1004 




104 


12 




12588 


4812 


5 




14260 


4 


1 i 


( 































4 


2 1 


» 































4 


3 ) 


) 































4 


4 t 


[ 































4 


5 ( 


\ 































5 


1 ] 


16 




63 




4 







20 


16 







103 


5 


2 


t««>(c««««t4 

















1 


1 





(* 


• * «****» 


5 


3 1 


16 




























16 


S 


4 ) 


I 16 




























16 


5 


5 J 


( 16 




























16 


6 


1 ) 


\ 































6 


2 1 


1 































6 


3 ) 


1 































6 


4 t 


I 































6 


5 4 


> 































7 


1 ) 


































7 


2 ) 


( 0- 































7 


3 ] 


































7 


4 i 


I 































7 


5 ( 


































TOTAL 


1 


t 21404 




161335 




5932 


695 


S 


136623 


57080 


209 




3252 94 


TOTAL 


2 ) 


t««««***«* 




15u66 




1146 


132 


i 


27960 


10721 


19 


$* 


«j4c««4««* 


TOTAL 


3 ] 


\ 23498 




137J8 




2042 


237 


% 


6394 


2510 


2 




506 72 


TOTAL 


4 t 


\ 24912 




19064 




2532 


295 


s 


768 


94 8 







47276 


TOTAL 


5 


( 21404 




34039 




3706 


434 


$ 


12778 


5009 


6 




71927 


MINIMUM COSTS 1 


> 23498 




18632 




2034 


236 


% 


868 


1052 







45032 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 1 


( 11754 




9320 




1017 


236 


% 


434 


1052 







22527 


ACCUMULATED 


COSTS 


t 54171 




43287 




5319 


1032 


( 


6323 


83'^o 


21 




109111 



TRAFFIC WARRENITS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REuUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 10 DIRECTION C0M3INED 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE C 
REHABIL ITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS LOSS TIME 

COSTS *X100 CUSTS HOURS 



POLLUT ION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 


$ 21508 


$ 116974 




4415 


513 


i 36830 


25062 


107 ) 


179727 


1 


2 


{«*«***»•« 


$ 12955 




92 7 


109 


$ 9211 


6516 


12 ! 


««**««««« 


1 


3 


$ 23478 


i 14086 




loOo 


188 


( 








S 39170 


1 


4 


i 25992 


$ 15412 




2054 


242 


$ 





1 ] 


( 43458 


1 


5 


$ 21508 


» 24588 




2814 


331 


S 





1 ) 


I 49010 


2 


1 


» 7264 


$ 92385 




3485 


409 


% 24656 


19213 


82 


S 127791 


2 


2 


$«**««*««« 


$ 5931 




608 


70 


t 1300 


920 


1 


t**»****»* 


2 


3 


t 7736 


$ 10084 




1116 


130 


$ 226 


180 





! 19152 


2 


4 


$ 8230 


S 10200 




1404 


154 


t 





1 


( 19834 


2 


5 


$ 7264 


$ 19178 




2122 


249 


t 429 


342 


1 


( 28993 


3. 


1 


$ 676 


$ 4527 




56 


5 


t 125382 


34250 


69 i 


I 130641 


3 


2 


$ 676 


$ 1875 




51 


6 


$ 39772 


11407 


18 


t 42384 


3 


3 


t 676 


t 1004 




54 


7 


S 15404 


5410 


5 ! 


( 17148 


3 


4 


» 676 


$ 5 88 




60 


5 


$ 1352 


1772 


1 


I 25 75 


3 


5 


$ 576 


i 2008 




128 


14 


> 30808 


10820 


13 


( 33620 


4 


1 


» 21096 


$ 251527 




8063 


948 


$ 330403 


114870 


353 


\ 611189 


4 


2 


$»**##**## 


$ 15909 




1255 


147 


1 4897 


3556 


11 ! 


t*«*«**«*« 


■4 


3 


t 21362 


t 20034 




2614 


307 


$ 11470 


8982 


20 1 


( 55480 


4 


4 


t 21894 


% 17600 




3192 


374 


t 14880 


12712 


42 


I 57566 


4 


5 


t 21096 


t 39237 




5119 


501 


$ 22465 


17591 


40 


I 87917 


5 


1 


t 12 


i 45 




3 





> 14 


11 


) 


[ 74 


5 


2 


$««*««»*»» 


% 










( 1 





J 


£******««* 


5 


3 


$ 12 


$ 










$ 








( 12 


5 


4 


t 12 


$ 










S 








( 12 


5 


5 


» 12 


$ 










$ 








( 12 


6 


L 


» 


% 










$ 








( 


6 


2 


i 


% 










t 





1 


( 


6 


3 


t 


S 










( 





1 


( 


6 


4 


$ 


t 










i 





) 





6 


5 


$ 


$ 










t 





1 


\ 


7 


1 


» 


t 










$ 





( 


> 


7 


2 


i 


$ 










S 








i 


7 


3 


$ 


{ 










* 








( 


7 


4 


« 


» 










$ 








( 


7 


5 


$ 


$ 










% 





1 


1 


TOTAL 


1 


$ 50556 


$ 465559 




16022 


1880 


$ 517285 


193405 


621 


( 1049422 


TOTAL 


2 


$#«:* ;<(**«*« 


$ 37671 




2851 


332 


t 55181 


22509 


42 


t********* 


TOTAL 


3 


% 53264 


t 45208 




5400 


632 


$ 27100 


14572 


26 ) 


I 130972 


TOTAL 


4 


i 56804 


$ 43800 




6720 


785 


$ 16232 


14484 


45 J 


( 123556 


TOTAL 


5 


$ 50555 


i 85111 




10183 


1195 


t 53702 


28753 


55 


I 199552 


MINIMUM COSTS 


% 53264 


$ 44792 


$ 


5395 


631 


% 13048 


10934 


21 


( 115500 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 


t 24671 


t 20747 


$ 


2499 


631 


t 6043 


10934 


21 


( 53952 


ACCUMULATED 


COSTS 


$ 78842 


% 64034 


i 


7818 


1563 


» 12356 


19280 


42 i 


[ 163073 



165 



TKAFFIC HAKRfcNTS FOR PKEMIOM PAVEMENTS REUUIRINU REOUCEU MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 11 OUECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE t. 


OPERATION 


ACCIDENTS 


LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 


TOTAL 


NUMbER 


CATEGORY 


REHABIL ITAI lON 


COSTS 


COSTS 


#X100 


COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 


COSTS 


I 


I 




I'lZZ* 


$ 108154 i 


4297 


505 1 


. 35641 


26233 


102 i 


i 162816 


1 


2 


$* 


*#♦*#*** 


% Ib'^'i 1 


! 522 


61 1 


\ 





1 


****««**« 


1 


3 




15*97 


i 9408 1 


134* 


158 1 








1 


i 262S3 


1 


* 




17502 


$ 10580 ( 


h 2033 


245 1 








1 ) 


I 30170 


1 


5 




1*724 


$ 17325 1 


2482 


292 ! 


I 





I 1 


( 34531 


2 


1 




3632 


t 64335 


\ 2615 


307 


\ 12341 


13993 


57 ( 


t 82923 


Z 


2 


$«»«*•**«* 


S 1308 1 


278 


32 \ 


i 








(****••**• 


2 


3 




3368 


$ 5156 ] 


\ 753 


89 1 


<, 


2 


1 


( 9782 


2 


* 




•.115 


i 5232 


1112 


130 ( 


\ 








( 10459 


2 


5 




3632 


I 9806 


I 1441 


169 1 


i 


3 


I 


I 14879 


i 


1 




395 


I 330 1 


30 


3 1 


i 16263 


3801 


9 


( 17018 


3 


2 




395 


t 245 


fc 35 


4 


( 








( 675 


3 


3 




395 


t 240 i 


> 36 


4 


i 








( 671 


3 


* 




395 


i 212 


t 36 


4 


i 





1 


( 643 


3 


S 




395 


t 480 ) 


. 72 


3 


i 








t 947 


't 


1 







$ 


fc 


I 


i 





1 


i 


4 


2 







t 








1 





1 


i 


4 


3 







$ 


I 





i 








( 


<i 


4 







» ) 








i 








i 


4 


5 







t 1 


1 


1 


i 





1 


( 


5 


I 




4 


t 29 \ 


2 


( 


» 3 


7 





1 38 


5 


2 


$«*«*«*««« 


i 


I 





t 








,»*«•*•*** 


5 


3 




4 


$ 


I 


J 


( 








t 4 


5 


^ 




4 


I 


\ 





( 





1 


i 4 


5 


5 




4 


% t 





■) 


( 








I 4 


6 


1 







t 


i 





1 








t 


6 


2 







S 


fc 


1 


i 








( 


6 


3 







* 


t 





( 








( 


6 


4 







t ) 


i 





t 








t 


6 


S 







i 


I J 





t 








i 


7 


1 







t 


fc 





i 








i 


7 


2 







i 


\ 





( 








( 


7 


3 







t 


( J 





( 








( 


7 


4 







I 


( 





( 








( 


1 


5 







i ) 


\ 





» 








( 


TOTAL 


1 




18755 


$ I72a4a 


I 6944 


815 


1 64243 


44034 


168 


► 262795 


TOTAL 


2 


}«««««*«*« 


t 4198 


\ 835 


97 


( 








;««««**««« 


TOTAL 


3 




19764 


$ 14804 


( 2142 


251 


I 


2 





( 36710 


TOTAL 


't 




22016 


$ 16024 


( 3236 


379 


( 





1 


I 41276 


TOTAL 


5 




18755 


t 27611 


( 3995 


469 


( 


3 


2 


» 50361 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REOUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 11 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMdER 



CLOSURE 
CATEoURY 



MAINTENANCE t 
REHAolLlTAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS «X100 



LOSS TIME POLLUTION 
COSTS HOURS .01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 




14724 


I 60399 


i 2096 


246 


i 19172 


10724 


44 


( 96391 


1 


2 




19316 


i 15499 


t 324 


96 


i 15397 


10337 


19 


S 51036 


1 


3 




15497 


t 96o2 


i 828 


97 


( 








i 25987 


1 


4 




17502 


( 1U840 


i 372 


102 


( 








( 29214 


1 


5 




14724 


i 17793 


i 1524 


179 


i 








t 34041 


2 


1 




3032 


I 34205 


i 1125 


132 


( 14144 


6866 


25 


( 53106 


2 


2 




4126 


i 5833 


i 366 


43 


k 1549 


1040 


2 


( 11874 


2 


3 




33o8 


I 5308 


( 382 


44 


t 433 


274 





( 9996 


2 


4 




4115 


. 5328 


k 384 


45 


( 








» 9827 


2 


5 




3632 


i 1U095 


i 725 


85 


i 833 


521 





( 15286 


3 


1 




395 


i bZlZ 


i 35 


4 


( 153317 


43014 


72 


( 1S99S9 


3 


2 




395 


fc 2092 


( 36 


4 


I 54335 


15952 


21 


k 568S8 


3 


3 




395 


b 826 


( 40 


4 


k 21936 


7236 


6 


i 23197 


3 


4 




395 


i 564 


( 40 


4 


i 1332 


2776 


1 


( 2831 


3 


5 




395 


( 16!>2 


I 80 


9 i 


i 43872 


14472 


13 


t 45999 


4 


1 




1 


i 


i 


1 


i 








( 


4 


2 




) 


i 


i 


( 


i 





1 


I 


4 


3 




1 


i 


i 


1 


i 








i 


4 


4 




) 





I 


) 


i 





) 


( 


4 


5 




! 


k 


i 


) 


i 





i 


I 


5 


1 




4 1 


. 


i 


j 


I 6 


1 


) 


( 10 


5 


2 




4 ) 


t 1 





i 


i 1 





1 


i s 


5 


3 




4 S 


t 


i 


i 








) 


I 4 


5 


4 




4 


. 1 


( 


i 








( 


i 4 


i> 


5 




4 J 


1 


i 


] 


I 





I 


4 


6 


1 




1 


1 


> 


i 








t 


i 


6 


2 




J 


i 


i 


t 








) 





6 


3 




) 


i 1 





1 








) 





6 


4 




J 


( 


i 


J 








) 





6 


5 




1 


. ( 





] 








) 





7 


1 




) 


1 


t 


1 








) 





7 


2 




1 


) 





4 








1 





7 


3 




) 


) 





( 








1 





7 


4 







J 





] 








1 





7 


5 




i 


1 





) 








4 





TOTAL 


1 




18755 1 


10 0816 


1 3256 


382 1 


186639 


60605 


141 4 


309466 


TOTAL 


2 




23841 1 


2 3424 1 


. 1226 


143 » 


71282 


27329 


42 4 


119773 


TOTAL 


3 




19764 ( 


15796 ) 


1250 


145 1 


22374 


7510 


6 4 


59184 


TOTAL 


4 




22016 j 


16732 ) 


. 1296 


151 ) 


1832 


2776 


1 4 


41876 


TOTAL 


5 




18755 ( 


29540 1 


2330 


273 1 


44705 


14993 


13 4 


95330 



**• SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



166 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM i^AVEMEi^TS REOUIRIIJG REUUCEfl MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS rSAR: U DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLUSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE i. 
REHAB.ILITAI UN 



OPERA! lUN 

cusrs 



ACCIDENTS LUSS TIME 

COSTS #X100 COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1155^ 

#♦*♦♦***• 

<i0518 

17S59 

3632 

3868 

4U5 

3632 

*51 

451 

451 

451 

451 











3 

3 
3 
3 













151870 

3582 

11534 

14328 

21334 

69280 

1603 

5418 

6412 

10304 

151 

542 

288 

264 

575 











19 































5471 


643 


609 


71 


lo96 


199 


2436 


286 


3137 


369 


2825 


332 


279 


32 


812 


95 


1116 


131 


1544 


181 


37 


4 


34 


4 


44 


5 


44 


5 


88 


10 

















J 














2 


























































































60327 


60180 


60/ 


913 








2u68 


3652 








14091 


15406 


399 


54 7 


4 


16 


1596 


2188 


7 


30 


23731 


5272 


36 1 


426 



























































































































198152 


80862 


142/ 


1885 


4 


16 


4264 


5840 


7 


30 



183 

1 
2 
2 
58 


1 
1 
12 



























$ 335227 

(«*«**«««* 

S 31671 

» 39950 

$ 42030 

S 89828 

$ 10102 

$ 13239 

I 15487 

i 24370 

$ 1388 

$ 783 

$ 759 

$ 1115 

$ 

t 

$ 

i 

$ 

$ 27 
(*«*««** «# 

» 3 

$ 3 

i 3 

i 

$ 

S 

$ 

S 

$ 

i 

t 

I 

$ 



TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 



$ 21645 

t 22763 

$ 25087 

% 21545 



221320 

5727 

17240 

21004 

32214 



8335 979 

922 107 

2552 299 

3596 422 

4769 550 



253 

1 
3 
3 



$ 449452 
$«*«**»*«« 
$ 42559 
$ 53951 
$ 58535 



*** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT 8E OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 12 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE £, 
RcHABIL ITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS »X10J 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 




17559 




74451 




2621 


308 




22425 


13102 


51 


i 117056 


1 


2 




23282 




20117 




998 


117 




25342 


15212 


25 


t 59739 


1 


3 




18441 




11564 




1008 


118 













i 31013 


1 


4 




20518 




13020 




1092 


123 













$ 34630 


1. 


5 




17559 




21390 




1864 


219 










1 


t 40813 


2 


1 




3532 




35585 




1181 


138 




15028 


7252 


25 


$ 55426 


2 


2 




4126 




6171 




376 


44 




2303 


1348 


2 


i 12976 


2 


3 




3868 




5424 




400 


47 




720 


388 





S 10412 


2 


4 




4115 




5496 




404 


47 













$ 10015 


2 


5 




3632 




10315 




750 


89 




13C.9 


737 


1 


i 16077 


3 


1 




451 




10389 




39 


4 




205157 


59790 


89 


$ 215036 


3 


2 




451 




3179 




42 


4 




79256 


23480 


27 


i 82928 


3 


3 




451 




1226 




44 


5 




32226 


10582 


9 


$ 33947 


3 


4 




451 




744 




48 


5 




2348 


3992 


2 


% 3591 


3. 


5 




451 




2452 




88 


10 




54452 


21164 


18 


t 67443 


4 


1 































$ 


4 


2 































$ 


4 


3 































» 


4 


4 































t 


4 


5 































t 


5 


1 




3 

















4 


1 





$ 7 


5 


2 




3 

















1 








i 4 


5 


3 




3 


























$ 3 


5 


4 




3 


























i 3 


5 


5 




3 


























i 3 


6 


1 































S 


6 


2 































$ 


5 


3 































$ 


6 


4 































i 


6 


5 































S 


7 


1 































i 


7 


2 































t 


7 


3 































i 


7 


4 































$ 


7 


5 































i 


TOTAL 


1 




21645 




120425 




3 841 


450 




242514 


80145 


165 


$ 388525 


TOTAL 


2 




27852 




29467 




1416 


165 




105902 


40040 


54 


S 155647 


TOTAL 


3 




22763 




18214 




1452 


170 




32945 


10970 


9 


i 75375 


TOTAL 


4 




25087 




19260 




1544 


180 




2348 


3992 


2 


S 48239 


TOTAL 


5 




21645 




34158 




2712 


318 




55821 


21901 


20 


% 124335 



**» SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



167 



TKAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 11 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAI 


NTEmANCE £. 


OPERATION 


NUMiJtR 


CATEl^UKY 


REHASIL ITATIGN 




COSTS 


1 


1 




29448 


$ 


160553 


I 


2 


$* 


**v#t**» 


S 


18144 


I 


3 




30^94 


$ 


19070 


1 


4 




35004 


i 


21420 


1 


S 




2 944t) 




35118 


2 


I 




7264 




98540 


i 


2 


$* 


*<tv»**** 




7141 


I 


3 




773o 




10464 


Z 


4 




8230 




10560 


z 


5 




7264 




19901 


3 


1 




790 




6542 


3 


2 




790 




2337 


3 


3 




790 




1066 


3 


4 




790 




776 


3 


5 




790 




2132 


't 


1 












<( 


2 












* 


3 












4 


4 












4 


5 












5 


1 




8 




2"^ 


5 


2 


$« 


*v#«.**** 







5 


3 




8 







5 


4 




8 







D 


5 




8 







6 


I 













ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



6393 


751 


1346 


157 


2176 


255 


2960 


347 


4006 


471 


3740 


439 


644 


75 


1140 


133 


1496 


175 


2167 


254 


65 


7 


71 


8 


76 


8 


76 


8 


152 


17 



54813 

15397 







26485 

1549 

438 



833 

169580 

54335 

21936 

1832 

43872 











9 

1 



















36957 

10337 







20859 

1040 

276 



524 

46815 

15952 

7236 

2776 

14472 











POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 

146 
19 



1 

1 
82 

2 





1 
81 
21 

6 

1 
13 











































TOTAL 
COSTS 

t 259207 

t 52240 

% 5 93 84 

$ 68572 

i 136029 



19778 
2028& 
30165 
176977 
57533 
23868 
3474 
46946 





48 



% 
i 
% 
$ 
$ 
$ 

S 8 



TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 



» 37510 
$****#♦♦*« 

t 39528 
t 44032 
i 37510 



273664 
■ 27622 

30600 
32756 
57151 



10200 
206 1 
3392 
4532 
632 5 



1197 
240 
396 
530 
742 



230887 

71282 

22374 

1832 

44705 



104639 

27329 

7512 

2776 

14996 



309 

42 

6 

2 

15 



t 572261 

$******«** 
% 95894 

% 83152 

$ 145691 



MINIMOM COSTS 
UlSCOUNTtU COSTS 
ACCUMULATED COSTS 



39775 
17058 
95900 



30330 
13008 
77042 



3394 397 
1455 397 
9273 2060 



1832 2778 

785 2778 

13151 22058 



1 
1 

43 



75331 

32308 
195381 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 12 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE 1. 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 


TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY- 


REHABIL ITAT ION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 


COSTS 


1 


1 




35118 


S 


22o321 




8092 


951 




182752 


73282 


234 


$ 452283 


1 


2 


(4(*#'f^«#«4'# 




23699 




1607 


188 




26009 


16125 


25 


$*«««««*«* 


1 


3 




36882 




23098 




2704 


317 










1 


$ 62684 


1 


4 




41036 




27346 




3528 


414 




2668 


3652 


2 


% 745 80 


1 


5 




35118 




42724 




5001 


583 










3 


t 82843 


2 


1 




7264 




104865 




4006 


470 




29119 


22658 


83 


% 145254 


2 


2 


$*» 


<t****** 




7774 




655 


76 




2702 


189 5 


2 


(***«*««** 


2 


3 




7736 




10842 




1212 


142 




724 


404 





$ 20514 


2 


4 




8230 




11908 




1520 


178 




1596 


2188 


1 


» 23254 


2 


5 




7264 




20620 




2304 


270 




13^6 


767 


2 


$ 31564 


3 


1 




902 




10540 




76 


8 




228888 


65062 


101 


$ 240406 


3 


2 




902 




3721 




76 


8 




79617 


23906 


27 


S 84316 


i 


3 




902 




1514 




88 


10 




32226 


10582 


9 


% 34730 


3 


4 




902 




1008 




92 


10 




2348 


3992 


2 


$ 4350 


3 


5 




902 




3028 




176 


20 




64452 


21164 


18 


i 68558 


4 


1 































$ 


4 


2 































$ 


4 


3 































S 


4 


4 































$ 


4 


5 































i 


5 


1 




6 




19 




2 







7 


5 





» 34 


5 


2 


$#***♦*»** 

















1 








$**««***«* 


5 


3 




6 


























$ 6 


5 


4 




6 


























S 6 


5 


5 




6 


























% 6 


6 


1 































$ 


6 


2 































$ 


6 


3 































t 


6 


4 































$ 


o 


5 































$ 


7 


1 































$ 


7 


2 































$ 


7 


3 














J 
















$ 


7 


4 































$ 


7 


5 































» 


TOTAL 


1 




43290 




341745 


i 


12176 


1429 




440766 


161007 


418 


$ 837977 


TOTAL 


2 


$*♦ 


#*«**»« 




35194 


% 


2338 


272 




108329 


41926 


54 


$«***»**** 


TOTAL 


3 




45526 




35454 


i 


4004 


469 




32950 


10936 


10 


t 117934 


TOTAL 


4 




5U174 




40264 


i 


5140 


602 




6612 


9832 


5 


$ 102190 


TOTAL 


5 




43290 




66372 


$ 


7481 


878 




65828 


21931 


23 


$ 182971 


MINIMUM 


COSTS 




45773 




35020 


( 


4012 


469 




2352 


4008 


3 


$ 87157 


DISCOUNT 


CD COSTS 




18177 




13907 


I 


1593 


469 




934 


4008 


3 


$ 34611 


ACCUMULATED COSTS 




114077 


$ 


90949 


t 


10866 


2529 




14085 


26066 


46 


$ 229992 



168 



TRAFFIC WAKRENTS FJR PKEMIUM PAVE:1ENTS REJUIRING REJUCEO MAINTtNANCt 
ANALYSIS VEAR: 13 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGURr 



MAINTENANCE E 
REHABILITAT ION 



QPEKATIUN 
COSTS 



ACCIUENTS 
COSTS »XIOO 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUT (ON 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





1 


I 19392 




180672 




6486 


763 




205450 


75150 


213 




412000 




2 


t«*«««««*« 




5127 




695 


81 




2707 


3745 


3 


$* 


««««««*« 




3 


S 20314 




13212 




1990 


234 










1 




35516 




4 


( 23440 




205db 




2780 


327 




10828 


14980 


13 




5 75 56 




5 


S 19392 




24543 




3696 


434 










2 




47631 


2 


1 


t 3632 




74029 




3028 


356 




15038 


16824 


59 




95727 


2 


2 1 


t«««#«*«v« 




2135 




267 


31 




1393 


1928 


• 1 


$*««««««4'* 


2 


3 


i 3868 




5650 




86 6 


101 




8 


^Z 







10392 


2 


4 ) 


41<.6 




6540 




1068 


125 




5572 


nil 


6 




19326 


2 


5 1 


( 3632 




10745 




1647 


193 




15 


41 


1 




16039 


3 


1 


i 308 




2277 




49 


5 




45178 


9877 


22 




48012 


3 


2 1 


S 508 




591 




47 


5 




630 


634 







1775 


i 


3 t 


k 308 




344 




52 


6 















904 


3 


4 


i 508 




320 




52 


6 















880 


3 


5 ) 


i 508 




688 




104 


12 















1300 


4 


1 ) 


t 































't 


2 ) 


































4 


3 t 


k 































4 


4 1 


































4 


5 ) 


































5 


1 J 


2 




8 




1 







2 


2 







13 


5 


2 


t««««««*<<« 


























(«*««««««<< 


5 


3 1 


2 




























2 


5 


4 t 


i 2 




























2 


5 


S 1 


2 




























2 




1 1 


i 

































2 t 


i 

































3 ) 


i 

































4 ) 


t 

































5 J 


i 

































1 ) 


t 

































2 ] 


i 

































3 J 


t 

































4 j 


i 

































3 J 


i 































TOTAL 


1 


I 23534 




256906 




9564 


1124 


i 


265608 


101853 


294 




555752 


TOTAL 


2 ) 


t»»»»«**»» 




7853 




1009 


117 


i 


4730 


6307 


4 


S* 


*****##* 


TOTAL 


3 


I 24692 




19206 




2908 


341 


i 


8 


22 


1 




46814 


TOTAL 


'f 


( 28096 




29366 




3900 


'.58 


i 


16400 


22692 


19 




77764 


TOTAL 


5 


i 23534 




35976 




5447 


639 


i 


15 


41 


3 




64972 



*♦.♦ SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARR6NTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 13 DIRECTION PM PEAK. 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE (. 
REHABILITATION 



QPEKATIUN 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS «X100 



LUSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 1 


19392 




852 73 




3022 


355 




25332 


15199 


55 




133019 


1 


2 i 


25653 




21877 




1149 


135 




33249 


18436 


28 




81928 


1 


3 ) 


20314 




12968 




1150 


135 




90 


100 







34522 


1 


4 t 


22329 




14404 




1276 


150 















38009 


1 


5 1 


19392 




24090 




2136 


251 




167 


185 


1 




45785 


2 


1 t 


3632 




36896 




1234 


105 




15906 


7652 


25 




57670 


2 


2 i 


. 4126 




6216 




391 


46 




2o97 


1474 


2 




13430 


2 


3 ) 


3868 




5552 




414 


43 




1068 


505 







10902 


2 


4 


i 4115 




5576 




420 


49 















10111 


2 


5 1 


3632 




10559 




787 


92 




2031 


962 


1 




17009 


3 


1 


> 508 




12302 




45 


5 




242136 


70787 


100 




254991 


3 


2 i 


1 508 




3833 




49 


5 




96107 


28484 


32 




100497 


3 


3 i 


i 508 




1428 




48 


5 




37128 


12210 


9 




39112 


3 


4 1 


i SQ8 




824 




56 


6 




2604 


4500 


2 




39 92 


3 


5 i 


i 508 




2856 




96 


11 




7<.256 


24420 


19 




77716 


4 


1 i 


i 































4 


2 ) 


i 































4 


3 ) 


i 































4 


4 i 


( 































4 


5 i 


» 































5 


1 i 


i 2 

















3 


1 







5 


5 


2 i 


> 2 




























2 


5 


3 ) 


( 2 




























2 


5 


4 ( 


( 2 




























2 


5 


5 


I 2 




























2 




I 


( 

































2 3 


t 

































3 


i 

































4 


( 

































5 


» 

































I 


( 

































2 ( 


( 

































3 


( 

































4 


( 

































5 


( 































TOTAL 


1 


( 23534 




134473 




4301 


505 


$ 


283377 


93639 


180 




445585 


TOTAL 


2 


I 30289 




31926 




1589 


186 


% 


132053 


48394 


62 




195857 


TOTAL 


3 


t 24692 




19948 




1612 


188 


$ 


38286 


12816 


9 




84538 


TOTAL 


4 


I 26954 




20804 




1752 


205 


$ 


2604 


4500 


2 




52114 


TOTAL 


5 


i 23534 




37505 




3019 


354 


S 


76454 


25567 


21 




1405 12 



»•* SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNUT BE DCCUPIEO WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



169 



TRAFFIC WARRtNTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REUUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: I', DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE t 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


RLHABIL ITAT ION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


«X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 




20175 




202298 




7191 


846 




251724 


89563 


238 




481388 


1 


2 


$***«****« 




3886 




679 


79 













$*»***»«♦* 


i 


3 




28088 




19808 




3670 


431 




1422 


1568 


3 




52988 


1 


4 




21249 




15544 




2716 


319 










1 




41509 


1 


5 




20175 




24855 




4605 


541 




1784 


1967 


4 




51419 


^ 


1 




3632 




79175 




3251 


382 




16069 


18210 


60 




102127 


2 


2 


$««#«« «j4c«# 




1479 




266 


31 













£**«***««* 


2 


3 


* • 


4137 




6376 




1044 


122 




866 


956 







12423 


2 


4 




4115 




5916 




1064 


125 















11095 


2 


5 




Jo32 




11531 




1838 


222 




1566 


W28 


1 




18617 


3 


1 




564 




2486 




58 


6 




56555 


12608 


27 




59663 


3 


2 




564 




713 




56 


6 




2625 


1389 


2 




3958 


3 


3 




S64 




392 




62 


7 















1018 


3 


4 




564 




364 




64 


7 















992 


i 


5 




564 




784 




124 


14 















14 72 


4 


1 




































4 


2 




































4 


3 




































4 


4 




































4 


5 




































5 


1 




1 




U 




1 







1 


1 







3 


6 


2 


$**♦ 


****** 


























$********* 


5 


3 




I 




























1 


5 


4 




1 




























1 


5 


5 




1 




























1 


6 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 




































6 


4 




































6 


i 




































7 


1 




































7 


2 




































7 


3 




































7 


4 




































7 


5 




































TOTAL 


I 




24372 




283959 




10501 


1234 




324349 


120382 


325 




643181 


TOTAL 


2 


$******#** 




6078 




1001 


116 




2625 


138 9 


2 


$*««««**** 


TUTAL 


3 




32790 




26576 




4776 


560 




2288 


2524 


3 




66430 


TOTAL 


4 




27929 




21824 




3844 


451 










1 




53597 


TUTAL 


5 




24J72 


i 


37170 


i 


6617 


777 




3350 


3695 


5 




T1509 



*«« SIGNIFIES THAT ROAU CAtjNL'T BE OCCUPIEO WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 14 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCt t 


OPERATION 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHAUIL ITAT ION 




COSTS 


1 


1 


$ 


20175 




91878 


1 


2 


t 


26878 




20100 


1 


3 


i 


22347 




14842 


1 


4 


i 


2 3249 




15196 


1 


5 


$ 


20175 




25378 


2 


1 


s 


3632 




38123 


2 


2 


$ 


42 09 




6254 


2 


3 


$ 


3868 




5856 


2 


4 


$ 


4115 




5652 


2 


5 


$ 


3632 




11137 


3 


1 


$ 


564 




23201 


3 


2 


$ 


564 




5669 


3 


3 


s 


564 




1990 


3 


4 


i 


564 




1040 


3 


5 


i 


564 




3980 


4 


1 


$ 











ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 


COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 


26769 


16617 


57 


2618 


1720 


1 


























1 


16741 


8043 


24 


463 


303 





238 


310 














452 


589 





310960 


94785 


130 


127950 


39033 


40 


56136 


17940 


14 


33J8 


6008 


3 


112272 


35880 


28 















































2 







































































































































TOTAL 
COSTS 



3287 


386 


136 7 


160 


1282 


150 


1404 


165 


2192 


257 


1287 


151 


417 


49 


434 


51 


436 


51 


82 5 


97 


47 


5 


54 


6 


5'« 


6 


60 


7 


103 


12 









142109 

50963 

38471 

39849 

47745 

59783 

11343 

10395 

10203 

16046 

334772 

134237 

58744 

49 72 

116924 











3 

1 

1 

1 

1 























TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 



24372 
31652 
26780 
27929 
24372 



t 153202 

i 32023 

$ 22688 

$ 21888 

t 40495 



4621 542 

1838 215 

1770 207 

1900 223 

3125 366 



354472 

131031 

56374 

3308 

112724 



119445 

41056 

18250 

6008 

36469 



211 

41 

14 

3 

29 



536657 
196544 
107612 
55025 
180716 



*♦* SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT Bt OCCUPIEU rtlTHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



170 



TRAFFIC HARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REOUIRINi REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR; 1.3 QIRECTI'JN COMfllNEO 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE f. 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CAIESORY 


RtHABIL ITAT ION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


KXIOO 




COSTS 


HUURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 




I 


i 


36784 


$ 


26 5945 




9508 


1118 




230782 


90349 


268 




545019 




2 


$**#****♦* 


S 


27004 




1844 


216 




35956 


22181 


31 


$**«*«**«« 




3 




40628 


S 


2ol80 




3140 


369 




90 


100 


1 




70038 




4 




45769 




34912 




4056 


477 




10828 


14980 


13 




95565 




5 




38784 




48633 




5832 


685 




167 


185 


3 




93416 


2 


I 




7264 




110927 




4262 


501 




30944 


24476 


84 




153397 


2 


2 


$#**##**#* 




8351 




658 


77 




4090 


3402 


3 


$* 


k6*4E#««4 


2 


3 




7736 




11202 




1280 


149 




1076 


52 8 







21294 


2 


4 




8261 




14116 




1488 


174 




5572 


7712 


6 




29437 


2 


5 




7264 




21304 




2434 


285 




2046 


1003 


2 




33048 


3 


1 




1016 




14579 




94 


10 




287314 


80664 


122 




303003 


3 


2 




1016 




4424 




96 


10 




96737 


29118 


32 




102273 


3 


3 




1016 




1772 




100 


11 




37128 


12210 


9 




40016 


3 


4 




1016 




1144 




108 


12 




2604 


4500 


2 




48 72 


3 


5 




1016 




3544 




200 


23 




74256 


24420 


19 




79016 


* 


I 




































4 


2 




































4 


3 




,0 































4 


4 




































4 


5 




































5 


1 




4 




3 




1 







5 


3 







18 


5 


2 


$«*****«»* 


























j»4i««*«*«4c 


5 


3 




4 




























4 


5 


4 




4 




























4 


5 


5 




4 




























4 


6 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 




































6 


4 




































6 


5 




































7 


1 




































7 


2 




































7 


3 




































7 


4 




































7 


5 




































TOTAL 


1 




47068 




391459 


i 


13 865 


1629 




549045 


195492 


4 74 




1001437 


TOTAL 


2 


$***#**»## 




39779 


i 


2598 


303 




136783 


54701 


66 


(««««*«*«.« 


TOTAL 


3 




49384 




39154 


i 


4520 


529 




38294 


12838 


10 




131352 


TOTAL 


4 




55050 




50172 


$ 


5652 


663 




19004 


27192 


21 




129878 


TOTAL 


5 




47068 




73481 


$ 


8466 


993 




76469 


25608 


24 




205484 


MINIMUM COSTS 




4 9631 




38550 


i 


4534 


531 




2702 


4622 


3 




95417 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 




18249 




14174 


$ 


1667 


531 




993 


4622 


3 




35084 


ACCUMULATED COSTS 




132326 




105123 


$ 


12533 


3060 




15078 


30688 


49 




265076 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS RE(JUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 14 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE £. 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHABILITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 


$ 


40350 




294176 




10478 


1232 




278493 


106180 


295 




623497 


1 


2 


$«4«««4:«4i:jc 




23986 




2046 


239 




2618 


1720 


I 


(********* 


1 


3 


$ 


50435 




34650 




4952 


581 




1422 


1568 


3 




91459 


1 


4 


i 


46498 




30740 




4120 


484 










1 




81358 


1 


5 


i 


40350 




50233 




6797 


798 




1784 


1967 


5 




99154 


2 


1 


$ 


7264 




117298 




4538 


533 




32810 


26253 


84 




161910 


2 


2 


$*»«»*»*»* 




7733 




683 


80 




463 


303 





$********* 


2 


3 


$ 


8005 




12232 




1478 


173 




1104 


126 6 







22819 


2 


4 


% 


8230 




11568 




1500 


176 















21298 


2 


5 


i 


7264 




22668 




2713 


319 




2018 


2317 


1 




34663 


3 


1 


I 


1128 




25687 




105 


11 




367515 


107393 


157 




3944 35 


3 


2 


$ 


1128 




o332 




110 


12 




130575 


40422 


42 




138195 


3 


3 


i 


1128 




2382 




116 


13 




56136 


17940 


14 




59762 


3 


4 


i 


1128 




1404 




124 


14 




3308 


6008 


3 




5964 


3 


5 


i 


1128 




4764 




232 


26 




112272 


35880 


28 




118395 


4 


1 


i 


































4 


2 


$ 


































4 


3 


$ 


































4 


4 


$ 


































4 


5 


$ 


































5 


1 


i 


2 









1 







3 


1 







5 


5 


2 


$* 


******** 












J 













$**#****** 


5- 


3 


$ 


2 




























2 


5 


4 


$ 


2 




























2 


5 


5 


$ 


2 




























2 


6 


1 


$ 


































6 


2 


$ 


































6 


3 


$ 


































6 


4 


$ 


































6 


5 


i 




































I 


i 




































2 


$ 




































3 


$ 




































4 


$ 




































5 


$ 


































TOTAL 


1 


$ 


48744 




437161 




15122 


1776 




678821 


239827 


5 36 




1179848 


TOTAL 


2 


$*»*«#*♦## 




38101 




2839 


331 




133656 


42445 


43 


}««******* 


TOTAL 


3 


$ 


59570 




49264 




6546 


767 




58662 


20774 


17 




174042 


TOTAL 


4 


i 


55858 




43712 




5744 


674 




3308 


6008 


4 




108622 


TOTAL 


5 


i 


48744 




77665 




9742 


1143 




116074 


40164 


34 




252225 


MINIMUM COSTS 


i 


54956 




43358 




562 2 


659 




3308 


6008 


4 




107244 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 


i 


18710 




14761 




1914 


659 




1126 


6008 


4 




36512 


ACCUMULATED COSTS 


i 


151036 




119884 




14447 


3719 




16204 


36696 


53 




301588 



171 



TRAFFIC WARREnTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 15 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMbtR 



CLOSURE 
CATEGJRY 



MAINTENANCE £ 
REHASIL ITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS *X1D0 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





dObZ', 


$* 


#*#*t*** 




28727 




23610 




2062'. 




36i2 


$* 


******** 




*210 




4115 




3aiZ 




621 




621 




621 




621 




621 




10540 


$*****###* 




15617 




10947 




10548 




1 


$* 


******** 




1 




1 




1 






















































35426 


if 


******** 




49176 




39294 


$ 


35426 



229213 

3860 

249 32 

15440 

31261 

87775 

1470 

6076 

5880 

10841 

2792 

807 

432 

388 

864 

243533 

2339 

27990 

9356 

34tl01 

































7o46 


899 


72 5 


85 


3846 


452 


2900 


341 


4822 


567 


3358 


395 


28 1 


ii 


1113 


131 


1124 


132 


1994 


234 


67 


7 


65 


7 


72 


8 


72 


8 


144 


16 


7612 


895 


633 


74 


2830 


332 


2532 


297 


3518 


413 





























































































362763 


134483 








7915 


9600 








9925 


12037 


49879 


35949 








936 


1138 








1670 


2030 


68727 


15762 


6938 


2285 




















422722 


152923 


2190 


2529 


14256 


15856 


8760 


10516 


17725 


19714 


12 


7 























































































310 

4 
1 
6 
89 

1 

1 
32 
3 



353 
6 
14 
25 
17 


















620246 

********* 

55421 

41950 

66632 

144644 

*««**«*** 

12340 

11119 

18137 

72207 

8431 

1125 

1081 

1629 

684415 

•*••***** 

60693 

31595 

65592 

13 

********* 

1 

I 

1 























TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 



5o3313 

84 76 
59430 
31064 
77767 



i 18603 2196 

I 1704 199 

S 7866 923 

$ 5623 778 

i 10473 1230 



904103 339124 

9128 4914 

23108 26594 

8760 10516 

29320 33781 



784 

9 

19 

26 

24 



1521525 

********* 

139580 

85745 

152991 



»« SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNUT BE OCCUPIEO WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 15 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE (. 
REHABILITAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS »X1J0 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





1 




20624 




9o7 93 




3491 


410 


( 27898 


17820 


58 


( 148806 




2 




27448 




20694 




1448 


170 


( 3119 


2045 


1 


( 52709 




3 




22837 




15284 




1356 


159 


6 








( 39477 




4 




23610 




15532 




1484 


174 


i 








( 40626 




5 




20624 




26148 




2319 


272 


( 





1 


t 49091 




1 




3632 




39255 




1337 


157 


i 17570 


8455 


24 


( 61794 


2 


2 




4209 




63 05 




432 


50 


i 545 


374 





( 11491 


2 


3 




3368 




5918 




450 


52 


i 300 


395 





( 10536 


2 


4 




4115 




5638 




452 


53 


I 24 


84 





t 10279 


2 


5 




3632 




11255 




855 


100 1 


570 


753 





I 16312 


3 


1 




621 




27823 




54 


5 


I 354181 


108441 


143 ) 


( 382579 


3 


2 




621 




6667 




61 


7 


. 149631 


45668 


45 


I 156980 


3 


3 




521 




2300 




62 


7 


i 59012 


21426 


16 1 


( 71995 


3 


4 




621 




1128 




68 


8 ) 


3592 


5624 


3 


! 5409 


3 


5 




621 




4600 




124 


14 


k 138024 


42352 


32 


( 143369 


4 


1 




10548 




129016 




3323 


391 


( 357208 


98009 


192 


I 500100 


4 


2 




14495 




18499 




899 


105 


( 1973 


1283 


4 


i 35866 


4 


3 




10681 




11722 




1178 


138 


i 6498 


4168 


7 ) 


I 30079 


4 


4 




10947 




10360 




1340 


157 


( 7892 


5132 


12 


I 30539 


4 


5 




10548 




22958 




2307 


271 


fc 12727 


8153 


13 1 


t 48540 


5 


1 




1 












1 


2 





S 


i 3 


5 


2 




1 












1 








( 


1 


5 


3 




1 












i 








( 


i 1 


5 


4 




1 












1 








) 


1 


5 


5 




1 





















) 


i 1 


6 


1 

















) 








( 





6 


2 

















J 








1 





6 


3 

















4 








) 







4 

















) 








i 







5 

















1 








i 







1 

















J 








i 







2 

















i 








) 







3 

















1 








s 







4 

















1 








J 







5 

















1 








1 





TOTAL 


1 




35426 




292837 




8210 


964 1 


756859 


232725 


417 ) 


1093382 


TOTAL 


2 




46774 




52165 




2840 


332 1 


155268 


49370 


50 1 


257047 


TOTAL 


3 




33008 




35224 




3046 


356 1 


75810 


25990 


23 1 


152088 


TOTAL 


4 




39294 




32708 




3344 


392 1 


11508 


11840 


15 i 


86854 


TOTAL 


5 


i 


35426 




6496 1 




5505 


557 J 


151321 


51758 


46 1 


257313 



»** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNUT Bfc OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



172 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 16 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



Closure 
category 



MAINTENANCE i. 
REHABILITAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIUENTS 
COSTS *X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





1 


S 20833 




250896 


I 


8014 


942 




430285 


153677 


339 


i 710028 




2 


$«**«»*«** 




4048 




770 


90 













(«««««**«* 




3 


$ 29023 




25138 




3 66 


430 




135J0 


16068 


19 


i 71321 




4 


$ 23734 




16192 




3080 


362 










1 


$ 43006 




5 


( 20d33 




31509 




4587 


539 




169^1 


20140 


24 


J 73850 


2 


1 


$ 3632 




95748 




3477 


409 




62668 


4292 5 


96 


i 165525 


2 


2 


t******«** 




1506 




297 


34 













(««4t«««4i«« 


2 


3 


$ 4265 




7536 




1130 


132 




2416 


2980 


2 


$ 15347 


2 


4 


i 4115 




6024 




1188 


139 













t 11327 


2 


5 


i 3632 




13351 




2002 


235 




4280 


5279 


4 


$ 23265 


3 


1 


» 677 




4065 




87 


10 




lOOljl 


22540 


43 


i 104960 


3 


2 


$ 677 




897 




75 


8 




11508 


3351 


5 


$ 13157 


3 


3 


$ 677 




486 




84 


9 













$ 1247 


3 


4 


i 677 




436 




84 


9 













i 1197 


3 


S 


$ 677 




972 




168 


19 













$ 1817 


4 


1 


i 


























$ 


4 


2 


i 


























I 


4 


3 


i 


























t 


4 


4 


$ 


























i 


4 


5 


$ 


























S 


5 


1 


$ 

















11 


4 





i 11 


5 


2 


$**♦*♦**»* 


























(«6**»«««« 


5 


3 


t 


























I 


5 


4 


$ 




c 





















i 


5 


5 


$ 


























i 


6 


1 


$ 


























I 


6 


2 


$ 




c 





















$ 


6 


3 


$ 


























t 


6 


4 


$ 


























i 


6 


5 


$ 


























i 


7 


1 


$ 


























i 


7 


2 


I 


























i 


7 


3 


t 


























t 


7 


4 


i 


























i 


7 


5 


i 


























i 


TOTAL 


1 


i 25142 




350709 


$ 


11578 


1361 




593095 


224146 


478 


$ 980524 


TOTAL 


2 


J««««««#ll<« 




6451 


$ 


1142 


132 




11508 


3351 


5 


j#****«««* 


TOTAL 


3 


$ 33965 




33160 


$ 


4874 


571 




15916 


19048 


21 


$ 87915 


TOTAL 


4 


t 28526 




22652 


i 


4352 


510 










1 


i 55530 


TOTAL 


5 


$ 25142 




45832 


i 


6757 


793 




21201 


25419 


28 


( 98932 



*** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPItO WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARKENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 16 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE i. 
REHABILITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





1 


i 20833 


» 100379 




3655 


430 




28277 


18637 


57 


i 153144 




2 


( 27701 


$ 20913 




1512 


177 




3516 


2333 


2 


t 53642 




3 


( 23064 


$ 16286 




1356 


159 




1402 


1638 


1 


$ 42108 




4 S 


( 23734 


i 15492 




1552 


182 













$ 40778 




5 


t 20833 


i 278o9 




2320 


272 




2399 


2803 


1 


$ 53421 


2 


1 


( 3632 


$ 40245 




1385 


162 




17821 


8798 


24 


I 63083 


2 


2 


i 4209 


t 6317 




445 


52 




625 


460 





i 11596 


2 


3 1 


I 3868 


t 6122 




450 


52 




694 


876 





1 11134 


2 


4 , S 


i 4115 


I 5692 




464 


54 




92 


244 





i 10363 


2 


5 ( 


I 3632 


$ 11643 




855 


100 




1319 


1666 


I 


$ 17449 


3 


1 


( 677 


$ 4 1692 




56 


6 




407806 


126223 


161 


$ 450231 


3 


2 1 


i 677 


t 11602 




65 


7 




189020 


59641 


61 


J 201364 


3 


3 1 


( 677 


$ 3064 




68 


8 




94458 


29378 


21 


$ 98267 


3 


4 1 


( 677 


i 1376 




76 


8 




4520 


8460 


4 


i 6649 


3. 


5 ) 


( 677 


$ 6128 




136 


16 




188916 


58756 


42 


$ 195857 


4 


I 1 


( 


* 





















$ 


4 


2 


( 


$ 





















» 


4 


3 1 


( 


i 





















$ 


4 


4 


i 


I 





















$ 


4 


5 1 


I 


i 





















i 


5 


1 


i 


i 












1 








S 1 


5 


2 ] 


i 


$ 





















$ 


5 


3 1 


I 


i 





















$ 


5 


4 1 


( 


$ 





















$ 


5 


5 


i 


$ 





















i 


6 


1 ) 





i 





















S 


6 


2 


( 


$ 





















$ 


6 


3 ] 


i 


i 





















S 


6 


4 


I 


i 





















$ 


6 


5 


( 


S 





















$ 


7 


1 


b 


( 





















i 


7 


2 i 


i 


S 





















t 


7 


3 


» 


i 





















$ 


7 


4 


I 


i 





















i 


7 


5 


( 


$ 





















i 


TOTAL 


1 


t 25142 


$ 182316 




5096 


598 


$ 


453905 


15365 8 


242 


i 666459 


TOTAL 


2 


i 32587 


$ 38832 




2022 


236 


t 


193161 


62434 


63 


i 26 66 02 


TOTAL 


3 


i 2 7609 


» 25472 




1874 


219 


( 


96554 


31892 


22 


» 151509 


TOTAL 


4 


i 28526 


i 22560 




2092 


244 


S 


4612 


8704 


4 


$ 57790 


TOTAL 


5 


( 25142 


i 45640 




3311 


383 


( 


192634 


63225 


44 


S 266727 



»** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



173 



TRAHFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 15 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE i. 

kehabil itat ion 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



$ 412'VB 
$**#*##**» 

$ 51564 

$ 47220 

S 41248 

i TZb'i 

$ 8078 

$ 8230 

1 7264 

$ 1242 

$ 1242 

$ 1242 

$ 1242 

$ 1242 

$ 2109b 

$ 26293 

$ 21894 

$ 21096 

$ 2 

i 2 

$ 2 

$ 2 

S 

$ 

t 

$ 

i 

1 

i 

$ 

i 

i 



326006 

24554 

40216 

30972 

57409 

127030 

7775 

11994 

11568 

22096 

30615 

74 74 

2732 

1516 

5464 

372549 

20838 

39712 

19716 

57759 

































11137 


1309 




390661 


152303 


2173 


255 




3119 


2045 


5202 


611 




7916 


9600 


4384 . 


515 










7141 


839 




9925 


12037 


4695 


552 




67449 


44 404 


713 


83 




545 


374 


1568 


183 




1236 


1534 


1576 


185 




24 


84 


2849 


334 




2240 


2783 


121 


13 




422908 


124203 


126 


14 




156569 


47953 


134 


15 




69012 


21426 


140 


lo 




3592 


6624 


268 


30 




138024 


42852 


10940 


1286 




779930 


250932 


1532 


179 




4163 


3912 


4008 


470 




20754 


20024 


3872 


454 




16652 


15648 


5825 


684 




30452 


27877 










14 


7 


























































■0 












































































































































368 
I 
4 
1 
7 

113 

1 


1 

175 

48 

16 

3 

32 
545 

10 
21 
37 

30 


















i 769052 

104898 

82576 

115723 

206438 

22876 

21398 

34449 

4548 86 

165411 

73120 

6490 

144998 

1184515 

90772 

62134 

115132 

16 

********* 
2 
2 
2 













TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 



70852 
****** 
87184 
78588 
70852 



85o200 
60641 
94654 
63772 

142728 



$ 26893 3160 

t 4544 531 

$ 10912 1279 

$ 9972 1170 

i 16083 1887 



1660962 571849 

164396 54284 

98918 52584 

ZOibi 22356 

180641 85549 



1201 
59 
42 
41 
70 



S 2614907 
$«*»**««** 
S 291668 
$ 172600 
$ 410304 



MINIMUM COSTS 
DISCOJNTtD COSTS 
ACCUMULATED COSTS 



77549 

24446 
175482 



$ 64886 
$ 20454 
i 140338 



9682 1136 

3052 1136 

17499 4855 



18874 21392 

5949 21392 

22153 53038 



36 
36 
89 



$ 170991 
$ 53903 
$ 355491 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 16 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAlNTENAiMCE i. 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMaER 


CATEGORY 


REHABIL ITAT ION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




CUSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 




1 




4 1666 




351275 




11669 


1372 




458562 


177314 


396 




863172 




2 


I* 


******** 




24961 




2282 


267 




3516 


2333 


2 


$»****»*** 




3 




52087 




41424 




5016 


589 




14902 


17706 


20 




113429 




4 




47468 




31684 




4632 


544 










1 




83784 




5 




41666 




59378 




6907 


811 




19320 


22943 


25 




127271 


2 


1 




7264 




135993 




4362 


571 




80439 


51723 


120 




223608 


2 


2 


i* 


******** 




7823 




742 


86 




625 


46 





i********* 


2 


3 




8133 




13658 




1580 


184 




3110 


3856 


2 




26431 


2 


4 




8230 




11716 




1652 


193 




92 


244 







21690 


2 


5 




7264 




24994 




2857 


335 




5599 


6945 


5 




40714 


3 


1 




1354 




45757 




143 


16 




507937 


148763 


204 




555191 


3 


2 




1354 




12499 




140 


15 




200528 


6299 2 


66 




214521 


3 


3 




1354 




3550 




152 


17 




94458 


29378 


21 




99514 


3 


4 




1354 




1812 




160 


17 




4520 


8460 


4 




7846 


3 


5 




1354 




7100 




304 


35 




188916 


58756 


42 




197674 


4 


1 




































4 


2 




































4 


3 




































4 


4 




































4 


5 




































5 


1 






















12 


4 







12 


5 


2 


i* 


******** 


























i***t***t* 


5 


3 














J 





















5 


4 




































5 


5 




































6 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 




































6 


4 




































6 


5 




































7 


1 




































7 


2 




































7 


3 




































7 


4 




































7 


5 




































TOTAL 


1 




50284 




533025 




16674 


1959 




1047000 


377804 


720 




1646983 


TOTAL 


2 


t********* 




45283 




3164 


368 




204669 


65785 


68 


$* 


******** 


TOTAL 


3 




61574 




58632 




6748 


790 




112470 


50940 


43 




239424 


TOTAL 


4 




57052 




45212 




6444 


754 




4612 


8704 


5 




113320 


TOTAL 


5 




50284 




914 72 




10068 


1181 




213835 


38644 


72 




365659 


MINIMUM COSTS 




57052 




45212 




6444 


754 




4612 


8704 


5 




113320 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 




16653 




13197 




1880 


754 




1346 


8704 


5 




33077 


ACCUMULATED CUSTS 


i 


192135 




153535 




19379 


5609 




23499 


66792 


94 




388568 



174 



TKAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REOUCEO MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 17 UIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLUSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE (. 
REHABIL ITATIDN 



UPERATIUN 
CUSTS 



ACCIOENTS 
COSTS KXIOU 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



2 092 8 

29158 

23890 

20928 

3632 

4115 

3632 

73* 

73". 

734 

734 

734 





























337921 

337921 

337921 

337921 

337921 



275858 
45 79 

26240 

18316 

32885 

104810 

1781 

7938 

7124 

14063 

4333 

1022 

538 

480 

1076 































6063609 

180124 

665798 

104016 

1331926 



8102 


953 




588230 


217931 


783 


92 




625 


946 


3846 


452 




54714 


3290U 


3132 


368 




2500 


3734 


4820 


567 




68570 


41242 


3454 


4 05 




116968 


65 929 


292 


34 




375 


55 7 


1170 


137 




3730 


467 8 


1168 


137 




1500 


2268 


2072 


243 




6608 


8288 


107 


12 




130473 


30824 


86 


10 




15902 


4o32 


96 


11 










96 


11 










192 


22 
























































































15 


5 
































































































































22707 


2671 


155254192 


13467555 


4372 


514 




2516236 


615288 


3042 


357 


$16489934 


3349322 


3256 


383 




1232556 


405204 


6075 


714 


$32938576 


7589006 



381 



48 

2 

60 

108 

4 
1 
7 
55 
7 


















24424 
1135 
7198 

648 
14373 



$ 393118 

$•«««*««»« 
$ 113958 

$ 47838 

$ 127203 

i 228364 

$*<£* ^^l**** 

I 17103 

$ 13907 

$ 26375 

$ 135547 

$ 17744 

$ 1368 

$ 1310 

$ 2002 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 15 
$«««***««« 

$ 

I 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 

$ 51578429 

$ 3038553 

$ 17497595 

$ 1677749 

$ 34614499 



TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 
TOTAL 



$ 363215 

$ 372078 

$ 366650 

t 353215 



$ O44 8510 
$ 187506 
$ 701514 
$ 129936 
$ 1379950 



34370 4042 $56089878 13783244 24968 

5533 650 $ 2533138 521433 1143 

8154 957 $16548378 3886908 7250 

7652 899 $ 1236556 411256 651 

13160 1546 $33013754 7733536 14445 



$ 62936073 
$««******* 
$ 17630124 
$ 1740804 
$ 34770079 



*«* SIGNIFIES THAT ROAO CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRE.MTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 17 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAI 


NTENANCE C 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHABILITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


«X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 




20928 




103523 




3798 


445 




28537 


19473 


57 




155686 


1 


2 




27841 




21044 




1568 


184 




3827 


2592 


2 




54280 


1 


3 




23168 




16374 




1404 


165 




1408 


1708 


1 




423 54 


1 


4 




23890 




157o0 




1520 


190 















41270 


1 


5 




20928 




28022 




2402 


282 




2409 


2923 


1 




53751 


2 


I 




3532 




41256 




1431 


168 




18491 


9170 


23 




54810 


2 


2 




4209 




5325 




459 


54 




699 


518 







11592 


2 


3 




3858 




5118 




454 


54 




740 


97 







11190 


2 


4 




4115 




5728 




480 


56 




188 


304 







10511 


2 


S 




3632 




11635 




882 


103 




1407 


1844 


I 




17557 


3 


1 




734 




47312 




63 


7 




454261 


140952 


170 




502370 


3 


2 




734 




13804 




73 


8 




214595 


67851 


57 




229306 


3 


3 




734 




3488 




76 


8 




110456 


33986 


23 




114754 


3. 


4 




734 




1488 




88 


10 




4824 


9184 


4 




7134 


3 


5 




734 




5976 




152 


17 




220912 


67972 


47 




22 87 74 


4 


1 




































4 


2 




































4 


3 




































4 


4 


, $ 


































4 


5 




































5 


1 






















1 










1 


5 


2 




































S 


3 




































5 


4 




































5 


5 




































6 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 




































6 


4 

















J 


















6 


5 




































7 


1 




337921 




2578594 




22204 


2612 


$16268497 


4814759 


5327 




19207216 


7 


2 




337921 




34163 




2450 


288 




515029 


157918 


133 




889563 


7 


3 




337921 


$ 


32712 




2602 


305 




23598 


30800 


31 




395833 


7 


4 




337921 


S 


75284 




2954 


348 




1904936 


627058 


446 




2321105 


7 


5 




337921 


$ 


65342 




5197 


611 




47135 


61522 


53 




455595 


TOTAL 


1 




363215 


$ 


2770585 




27496 


3233 


$16769887 


4904354 


5577 




19931283 


TOTAL 


2 




370705 


$ 


75335 




4550 


534 




734250 


238879 


202 




1 184841 


TOTAL 


3 




365591 


$ 


58592 




4546 


533 




136202 


67464 


55 




555131 


TOTAL 


4 




366660 


$ 


982o0 




5152 


6 04 




1909948 


635555 


450 




2380020 


TOTAL 


5 




363215 


I 


111976 




8633 


1013 




271864 


134261 


112 




755688 



**« SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



175 



TRAFFIC WAKRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVE^1el>tTS REDUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: IB DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTiVl TY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE S 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NU^\ti£R 


CATEGORY 


REHABILITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 




712 




14125 




31 


3 















14868 


I 


2 


$*»»♦* 


**** 




148 





















$««*:^««*** 


1 


3 


$*«*«* 


**** 


























(«:^«»««**« 


1 


4 




743 




592 




408 


48 




29467 


12820 


19 




31210 


1 


5 


jv#****##* 


























$********* 


I 


L 




































Z 


Z 




































z 


i 




































z 


4 




































I 


5 




































i 


I 




790 




5004 




116 


13 




175834 


41854 


66 




181744 


3 


Z 




790 




1154 




104 


12 




21808 


645 1 


9 




23856 


i 


3 




790 




594 




108 


12 















1492 


3 


4 




790 




552 




108 


12 















1450 


3 


5 




790 




1188 




216 


25 















2194 


•t 


1 




5 




66 























71 


4 


2 


$****#*«** 


























$«:4[«««**«* 


4 


3 


$v******** 









J 
















{*«*«****« 


4 


4 




5 









1 







546 


133 







553 


4 


S 


t»«**v 


**** 







% 





u 













{«**%4(**** 


5 


1 












i 
























i 


2 


$#**** 


*v#* 







% 



















(*«4<**««** 


5 


3 


4*»#** 


*«v* 







i 



















*$***♦***** 


5 


4 












i 


J 







14 


3 







14 


5 


5 


$«*»»* 


♦ «»* 







t 



















$*******♦♦ 


6 


1 












i 
























6 


2 












$ 
























6 


3 












$ 
























6 


4 












i 
























6 


5 












t 


























1 












$ 


























2 












$ 


























3 












t 


























4 












i 


























5 


$ 





i 





$ 
























TOTAL 


1 


$ 


1507 


i 


19195 


$ 


147 


16 




175834 


41854 


66 




196683 


TOTAL 


2 


$#***# 


*»** 


i 


1302 


$ 


104 


12 




21808 


645 1 


9 


$*««*«***« 


TOTAL 


3 


$♦**#«**** 


i 


594 


$ 


108 


12 













$«******** 


TJTAL 


4 


$ 


1539 


$ 


1144 


i 


51 7 


60 




30027 


12956 


19 




33227 


TOTAL 


5 


$*v******* 


$ 


1188 


i 


216 


25 













$«******** 



*»* SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT 66 OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC IJARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 18 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLOSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE !. 
REHABILITATION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS SXIOO 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 



1 


1 




712 


$ 


40 75 




119 


14 




4170 


144 1 


2 


i 9076 


1 


2 




750 


i 


794 




39 


4 




354 


254 





i 1947 


1 


3 




753 


% 


526 




78 


9 




578 


208 


1 


1 2035 


1 


4 




743 


i 


536 




36 


4 













( 1315 


I 


5 




712 


$ 


996 




14 7 


17 




1285 


394 


3 


t 3140 


2 


1 







$ 
























( 


2 


2 







i 
























( 


2 


3 







$ 
























( 


2 


4 







$ 
























^ 


2 


5 







$ 
























( 


3 


1 




790 


$ 


38756 




64 


7 




507787 


158572 


115 


> 5473 97 


3 


2 




790 


i 


15923 




76 


8 




250516 


80089 


58 


( 257310 


3 


3 




790 


I 


6580 




78 


9 




142242 


4445 8 


30 


i 149590 


3 


4 




790 


$ 


1792 




92 


10 




5908 


11250 


5 


I 8582 


3 


5 




790 


t 


13160 




156 


18 




284484 


88916 


51 


► 298590 


4 


1 




5 


$ 















6 


1 


i 


( 11 


4 


2 




6 


$ 
























t 6 


4 


3 




6 


% 
























I 6 


4 


4 




6 


$ 
























( 6 


4 


5 




5 


$. 







J 
















( S 


5 


1 







$ 





















i 


i 


5 


2 







$ 





















1 


t 


5 


3 







S 





















) 


i 


5 


4 







$ 
























i 


5 


5 







1 





















i 


i 


6 


1 







5. 





















1 


I 


6 


2 







$ 





















( 





6 


3 







$ 





















) 





6 


4 







$ 





















( 





6 


5 







% 





















) 







1 







i 





















1 







2 







i 





















\ 







3 







$ 





















) 







4 







( 





















1 







5 







i 





















1 





TOTAL 


1 




1507 


% 


42d31 




183 


21 




511963 


160014 


iia 1 


556484 


TOTAL 


2 




1546 


t 


16722 




115 


12 




250880 


80J43 


58 1 


259263 


TOTAL 


3 




1549 


$ 


7106 




155 


18 




142920 


44655 


31 1 


151731 


TOTAL 


If 




1539 


t 


2328 




128 


14 




5908 


11260 


5 J 


9903 


TOTAL 


5 




1507 


i 


14156 




303 


35 




285T69 


89310 


54 1 


301735 



*** SIGNIFIES THAT RDAO CANNOT Bt OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



176 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 17 UIRtCTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE € 


UPEKAT lUN 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS TIME 


POLLUT ION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHABILITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


I 




41856 


$ 


379381 




11900 


1399 




516867 


237404 


438 




1050004 


I 


2 




»»»*♦»*« 


$ 


25623 




2351 


275 




4452 


3538 


2 


$**«***««* 


1 


3 




52326 




42614 




5250 


617 




55122 


34615 


49 




156312 


1 


4 




477B0 




34076 




4752 


558 




2500 


3784 


2 




89108 


1 


5 




4la56 




60907 




7222 


849 




70979 


44165 


61 




180964 


I 


I 




7264 




146066 




4885 


574 




135459 


7o099 


131 




2936 74 


2 


Z 


i«*«**»*»* 




8106 




751 


88 




1074 


1085 





$♦*♦««**«« 


2 


3 




B133 




14056 




1634 


191 




4470 


5548 


4 




28293 


2 


4 




B230 




12852 




1649 


193 




1588 


2572 


1 




24418 


i 


5 




7264 




25699 




2954 


345 




8015 


10132 


8 




43932 


3 


1 




l46a 




51645 




170 


19 




584734 


171770 


225 




638017 


3 


2 




1468 




14826 




159 


18 




230597 


72483 


74 




247050 


3 


3 




1468 




4026 




172 


19 




110456 


33986 


23 




116122 


3 


4 




1468 




19oa 




184 


21 




4824 


9184 


4 




8444 


3 


5 




1468 




8052 




3f4 


39 




220912 


67972 


47 




230776 


4 


1 














J 





















4 


2 




































4 


3 




































4 


4 




































4 


5 




































5 


1 






















16 


5 







16 


5 


2 


i* 


*^^t^i^^(.i^*^ 


























(««« 1^U1^^n^^ 


5 


3 




































5 


4 






















u 













5 


5 




































6 


1 




































6 


2 




































b 


3 














J 























4 

















J 




















5 






































1 




675842 




8642203 




44911 


5283 


$71522689 


1828231". 


29751 




80885645 




2 




675842 




214287 




6822 


802 




3031255 


783206 


1269 




392 8216 




3 




675842 




699510 




5644 


663 


S16513532 


3880122 


7229 




17894528 




4 




675842 




179300 




5220 


731 




3137492 


1032272 


1094 




3998854 




5 




675842 




1397268 




11273 


1325 


$32985712 


775J528 


14441 




35070095 


TOTAL 


1 




726430 




9219295 




6180Q 


7275 


$72859755 


l87o7598 


30545 




82867356 


TOTAL 


2 


(^^^f^+^^^c 




262842 




10083 


1184 




3257388 


850312 


1345 


(4#44«««»« 


TOTAL 


3 




737769 




75 02 06 




12700 


1490 


$16684580 


3954372 


7305 




18195255 


TOTAL 


4 




733320 




223196 




12804 


1503 




3146504 


1047812 


1101 




4120824 


TOTAL 


5 




726430 




149 1926 




21793 


2559 


$33285516 


7872797 


14557 




35525767 


MINIMUM COSTS 




733320 




185624 




12442 


1461 




12o5156 


451344 


586 




2196552 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 




198195 




50168 




3362 


1461 




341938 


451544 


686 




593665 


ACCUMULATED COSTS 




390330 




203703 




22741 


7070 




365437 


518335 


780 




982233 



TRAFFIC wiRRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 18 DIRECTION COMaiNED 



ACTIVITY 

NUMBER 



CLUSURE 
CATEGORY 



MAINTENANCE t 
REHABILITAT ION 



OPERATION 
COSTS 



ACCIDENTS 
COSTS #X100 



LOSS TIME 
COSTS HOURS 



POLLUTION 
.01 DAYS 



TOTAL 
COSTS 





1 


$ 1424 


$ 


18200 




150 


17 


$ 4170 


1441 


2 




23944 




2 


J^^VX'**^** 


$ 


942 




39 


4 


$ 354 


254 





i********* 




3 


$****»**** 


i 


525 




78 


9 


$ 678 


208 


1 


i********* 




4 


$ 1'.86 


I 


1128 




44". 


52 


$ 29467 


12820 


19 




32525 




5 


(**«««*:^«9 




995 




147 


17 


$ 1285 


394 


3 


i********* 




1 


$ 















$ 













2 


2 


$ 















$ 













2 


3 


$ 















$ 













2 


4 


$ 















$ 













2 


5 


$ 















$ 













3 


1 


$ 1580 




43760 




180 


20 


$ 583621 


200425 


182 




729141 


3 


2 


$ 1580 




17082 




180 


20 


$ 272324 


86540 


67 




291155 


3 


3 


$ 1580 




7174 




186 


21 


i 142242 


44458 


30 




151182 


.3 


4 


$ 1580 




2344 




200 


zz 


$ 5908 


11250 


5 




100 32 


3 


5 


$ 1580 




14348 




372 


43 


$ 284484 


83915 


51 




300784 


4 


1 


$ 10 




56 










$ 6 


1 







82 


4 


2 


$»«»♦♦»»»♦ 















$ 








$* 


******** 


4. 


3 


(*««***«*« 















$ 








i********* 


4 


4 


$ 12 









1 





$ 546 


133 







559 


4 


5 


$****««*** 















$ 








i* 


******** 


5 


1 


$ 















$ 













5 


2 


$«*****««* 















$ 








i********* 


5 


3 


$**«««**#« 















$ 








i* 


******** 


5 


4 


$ 















$ 14 


3 







14 


5 


5 


$*****♦*** 















$ 








i********* 




1 


$ 















$ 















2 


$ 















$ 















3 


$ 















$ 















4 


% 















$ 















5 


$ 















$ 















1 


i 















$ 















2 


t 















$ 















3 


$ 















$ 















4 


t 















S 















5 


$ 















$ 













TOTAL 


1 


$ 3014 




62026 




330 


37 


$ 687797 


201868 


184 




753157 


TOTAL 


2 


i^^^^if^^t^1^l^^^^ 




18024 




219 


24 


$ 272588 


86 79 4 


57 


i* 


******** 


TOTAL 


3 


it******** 




7700 




264 


30 


$ 142920 


44665 


31 


i* 


******** 


TOTAL 


4 


$ 3078 




3472 




64 5 


74 


$ 35935 


24216 


24 




43130 


TOTAL 


5 


i********* 




15344 




519 


60 


$ 285769 


89310 


54 


i* 


******** 


MINIMUM COSTS 


$ 3045 




17071 




26 7 


29 


$ 5908 


11260 


5 




26291 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 


$ 762 




4272 




66 


29 


$ 1478 


11260 


5 




5579 


ACCUMULATED 


COSTS 


$ 391092 




207975 




22807 


7099 


J 366915 


529590 


785 




988812 



TKAFFIC WARREi^lTS FOR PRtMIUM PAVEMENTS REUUIRING 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 19 



REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAI 


NTENANCE £ 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMilER 


CATEGORY 


REHAbIL ITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#XIJJ 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


I 


I 


1 


2T31 


i 


51884 




170 


20 


i 











i 


54785 


I 


2 


t**#**«*** 


$ 


819 










s 











$«******«* 


1 


J 


$* 


#W5:*V*¥ 


$ 













i 











$«« 


******* 


I 


4 




3885 


S 


3276 




1512 


177 


i 


111020 


45770 


56 


$ 


119693 


I 


5 


$* 


******** 


t 













i 











£**#*«#*#* 


I 


1 







$ 













i 
















Z 


2 







i 


(J 










i 
















2 


3 







$ 













i 
















2 


4 







$ 













$ 
















2 


5 







$ 













i 
















3 


i 




846 


$ 


4925 




130 


15 


$ 


222511 


52858 


79 




228412 


i 


2 




846 


$ 


2454 




118 


13 


s 


48060 


11199 


17 




51478 


3 


3 




846 


$ 


652 




122 


14 


i 













1620 


3 


4 




846 


% 


600 




124 


14 


i 













15 70 


3 


5 




846 


% 


1304 




244 


2B 


% 













2394 


<• 


1 




29 


$ 


560 




1 





i 













590 


4 


2 


t* 


******** 


i 


■ 










i 











$*****#*** 


4 


3 


$***»♦***# 


t 













$ 











$*«**»**«» 


4 


4 




34 


$ 







9 


1 


$ 


3505 


900 


1 




3548 


4 


5 


$#:tt«:tc«#4c:((« 


$ 













$ 











$******«*« 


5 


1 







% 













s 
















5 


2 


(«««#««:«:*« 


% 













$ 











$«****«*** 


.5 


. 3 


$**«**»»** 


i 













i 











$*«*«***** 


5 


4 







% 













I 


15 


1 







15 


5 


5 


$»**#*#*#* 


i 













% 











$**««***** 


6 


1 







$ 













i 
















6 


2 







{ 













i 
















6 


3 







i 













s 
















o 


4 







i 













s 


















5 







i 













s 


















1 







i 













i 


















2 







$ 













i 


















3 







$ 













i 


















4 







$ 













i 


















5 







$ 





i 








i 
















TOTAL 


1 




3606 


i 


57369 




301 


35 


$ 


222511 


52858 


79 




283787 


TOTAL 


2 


$« 


******** 


i 


32 73 




118 


13 


i 


48060 


11199 


17 


$*«*****«* 


TOTAL 


3 


$* 


******** 


i 


652 




122 


14 


$ 











$***«**«♦» 


TOTAL 


4 




4765 


i 


3876 




1645 


192 


$ 


114540 


46671 


57 




124826 


TOTAL 


5 


$**#**»*** 


i 


1304 




244 


28 


i 











$«*»**»«*« 



«»* SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 19 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE f. 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLOTIQN 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHABILITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 




2731 




18174 




64 


75 


i 


8889 


4381 


10 




30434 


1 


2 




4123 




4413 




230 


27 




2142 


1527 


1 




10908 


1 


3 




4091 




3056 




436 


51 




4504 


1404 


3 




12087 


I 


4 




3885 




2908 




216 


25 















7009 


1 


5 




27jI 




4137 




590 


69 




6093 


1901 


4 




13555 


2 


1 




































2 


2 














J 





















2 


3 




































2 


4 




































2 


5 




































3 


1 




846 




43339 




70 


8 




557731 


174668 


121 




601986 


3 


2 




846 




17978 




82 


9 




278530 


89203 


61 




297436 


3 


3 




846 




7446 




86 


10 




160526 


50276 


33 




168904 


3 


4 




846 




1908 




100 


11 




6228 


12072 


5 




9082 


3 


5 




846 




14892 




172 


20 




321052 


100552 


66 




335962 


4 


I 




29 




53 




3 







53 


20 







138 


4 


2 




34 




11 












5 










50 


4 


3 




34 




6 












10 


14 







50 


4 


4 




34 




























34 


4 


5 




29 




7 












12 


17 







48 


5 


1 




































b 


2 




































5 


3 




































5 


4 




































5 


5 




































6 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 




































6 


4 




































6 


5 




































7 


1 




































7 


2 




































7 


3 




































7 


4 




































7 


5 







$ 





























TOTAL 


1 




3606 


$ 


61566 




713 


83 




566673 


1790o9 


131 




632558 


TOTAL 


2 




5003 


$ 


22402 




312 


36 




280677 


90730 


62 




308394 


TOTAL 


3 




4971 


i 


10508 




522 


61 




165040 


51694 


36 




181041 


TOTAL 


4 




4765 


$ 


4816 




316 


36 




6228 


12072 


5 




16125 


TOTAL 


5 




3606 


i 


19036 




762 


89 




327162 


102470 


70 




350555 



«** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS RfcOUlRING REOUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: ^0 DIRECTION AM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE £ 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 


LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 


TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHAb 


ILITATIUN 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#xiao 


COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 


COSTS 




1 




10U47 




20 2416 




593 


59 


i 








t 213056 




2 


$♦*«**»*#♦ 




2860 










k 








t«v*«««««4[ 




3 


$4:##4:*««Jr4' 















i 








t«««««46«* 




4 




12469 




11440 




5610 


660 


I 497937 


18^510 


198 


i 527455 




5 


$*v******» 















I 








t«««««»#«« 


2 


1 




















i 


0- 





t 


2 


2 














u 


1 


t 





1 





2 


3 




















I 





! 


t 


2 


4 




















( 











2 


5 














J 





i 








t 


3 


1 




903 




6619 




150 


17 


( 280905 


67850 


97 


i 288577 


3 


2 




903 




3358 




140 


16 


6 68054 


13170 


25 


t 72455 


3 


3 




903 




850 




120 


14 


i Zb^ 


408 


! 


t 2135 


3 


4 




903 




636 




140 


16 


i 





) 


1679 


3 


5 




903 




1700 




240 


28 


t 524 


816 





i 3357 


4 


1 




152 




3945 




6 





I 16 


24 





4129 


4 


2 


$***«v*w** 




18 










i 





) 


t«««««**4« 


4 


3 


$****<£*»*» 















i 


u 


) 


g*4««»«*«« 


4 


4 




189 




72 




57 


5 


i 25003 


6478 


9 


( 25321 


4 


5 


$#9« 


»*#«** 















i 





1 


t***«***** 


5 


1 




















i 





) 





5 


2 


$»ff**»»»J?# 















i 





1 


*»*«***»* 


5 


3 


$9*V 


>***»* 















k 





! 


*4'««4t*#«« 


5 


4 














J 





i 12 





1 


12 


5 


5 


$***♦***♦* 












( 


i 





1 


*••***««* 


6 


1 

















1 


i 





1 





6 


2 

















1 














6 


3 




















t 





! 





6 


4 

















1 


i 





) 







5 




















( 





) 







1 

















1 


t 





! 


( 




2 

















1 


( 





1 







3 

















1 


I 













4 

















$ 








i 




5 

















i 





$ 


TOTAL 


1 




11112 




212930 




749 


86 i 280921 


57i»a4 


97 $ 505752 


TOTAL 


2 


$*##;p**V»« 




6235 




140 


16 $ 68034 


18170 


25 $***♦*»*«« 


TOTAL 


3 


$#**♦»♦*»* 




850 




120 


14 $ 252 


408 


(4i««««»«4« 


TOTAL 


4 




13561 




12148 




5807 


682 $ 522952 


194988 


207 $ 554458 


TOTAL 


5 


$«#«4#«4«« 




1700 




240 


28 t 524 


815 


(*«»«**«*« 



«** SIGNIFIES THAT ROAJ CAi^JNOT 6E OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REOUCfcO MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 20 DIRECTION PM PEAK 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE 6 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHAB 


ILITATION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


mxioo 




COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 




1 




10047 




70352 


t 


2572 


314 




17113 


13471 


34 




100184 




2 




2 034 7 




22444 


J 


1292 


152 




12055 


8888 


5 




55138 




3 




18807 




15518 




1150 


135 




716 


882 







36191 




4 




12469 




10048 




1228 


144 















23745 




5 




10047 




16531 




1228 


144 




765 


942 







2 8621 


2 


1 




































2 


2 




































2 


3 




































2 


4 






















u 













2 


5 














3 





















3 


1 




903 




48209 




77 


9 




609139 


191275 


125 




558323 


3 


2 




903 




20187 




89 


10 




307615 


93717 


65 




328795 


3 


3 




903 




8382 




94 


11 




179630 


56350 


35 




189009 


3 


4 




903 




2084 




104 


12 




5616 


13072 


5 




9707 


3 


5 




903 




16764 




188 


22 




359260 


112700 


71 




377115 


4 


1 




152 




505 




13 


2 




352 


149 







1037 


4' 


2 




190 




93 




5 







52 


15 







340 


4 


3 




177 




62 




6 







54 


30 







299 


4 


4 




189 




76 




3 







52 


20 







325 


4 


5 




162 




92 




8 







80 


44 







342 


5 


1 




































5 


2 




































5 


3 














J 





















5 


4 




V ° 































5 


5 




































6 


1 




































6 


2 




































t> 


3 




































6 


4 




































b 


5 




































7 


1 














J 





















7 


2 




































7 


3 




































7 


4 




































7 


5 




































TOTAL 


1 




11112 




119066 




27o7 


325 • 




626604 


204895 


150 




759549 


TOTAL 


2 




2 1440 




42724 




1386 


152 




319723 


107620 


71 




385273 


TOTAL 


3 




19887 




23962 




1250 


146 




180400 


57252 


35 




225499 


TOTAL 


4 




13561 




12208 




1340 


156 




6668 


13092 


5 




33777 


TOTAL 


5 




11112 




33437 




1424 


155 




350105 


113585 


71 




406078 



«*• SIGNIFIES THAT ROAD CANNOT BE OCCUPIED WITHIN V/C CONSTRAINTS 



179 



TKAFFIC HARRENTS FOR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REOUIKING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS year: 19 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE S 


OPERATION 




ACCIDENTS 


LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMbER 


CATEGORY 


REHAblLITAT ION 




COSTS 




COSTS 


#X100 


COSTS 


HOURS 


.01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


1 




54o2 


$ 


7005B 


i 


810 


95 


i 8889 


4381 


10 




85219 


I 


2 


$*** 


****** 


i 


5232 


i 


230 


27 


i 2142 


1527 


1 


t********* 


1 


3 


$«♦* 


****** 


i 


3056 


$ 


436 


51 


i 4504 


1404 


3 


»•*•**•**» 


1 


4 




7770 


i 


6134 


i 


1728 


202 


t 111020 


45770 


56 




126702 


1 


5 


^♦***#***# 


i 


4137 


i 


590 


69 


( 6098 


1901 


4 


t********* 


2 


1 







i 





i 





J 


( 













2 


2 







i 





i 








( 













2 


3 







$ 





i 








I 













2 


* 







i 





$ 








i 













2 


S 




a 


$ 





i 








i 













3 


1 




1692 


i 


48264 


i 


200 


23 


t 780242 


227526 


200 




330398 


3 


2 




1692 


i 


20432 


1 


200 


22 


I 326590 


100402 


78 




348914 


3 


3 




1692 


i 


8098 


$ 


208 


24 


i 160526 


50276 


33 




170524 


3 


* 




1692 


i 


2508 


i 


224 


25 


t 6228 


12 07 2 


5 




10652 


3 


5 




1692 


i 


16196 


i 


416 


48 


( 321052 


100552 


66 




339356 


<t 


1 




58 


i 


613 


$ 


4 





t 53 


20 







728 


4 


2 


i»** 


****** 


i 


11 


$ 








I 5 








$•*»*«*»** 


* 


3 


t#Xt*****»* 


i 


6 


$ 


J 





s xo 


14 





$«*««4i*«** 


4 


4 




68 


i 


a 


i 


9 


1 


t 3505 


900 


I 




3582 


<• 


5 


$##:4c«««##4( 


i 


7 


$ 








% 12 


17 





$********4> 


5 


1 







i 





$ 








t 













5 


2 


$*«*#**«♦« 


i 





$ 








( 








»*•*»»•*»* 


i 


3 


$***^#**#* 


i 





$ 








i 








$**»**♦»*» 


5 


4 







i 





I 








i 15 


1 







15 


5 


5 


$**# 


****** 


i 





s 








I 








{**«*»***« 


6 


1 







i 





i 








t 













6 


2 







i 





% 


.0 





( 













b 


3 







i 





i 








k 













6 


4 







% 





i 








t 













& 


5 







i 





i 








( 













7 


1 







i 





$ 








I 













7 


2 







i 





$ 








i 













7 


3 







i 





$ 








i 













7 


4 







$ 





i 








i 













7 


5 







i 





i 








6 













TOTAL 


1 




7212 


$ 


118935 


i 


lOl-. 


118 


( 789184 


2 3 1 92 7 


210 




916345 


TOTAL 


2 


t#»#***#** 


i 


25675 


i 


430 


49 


i 328737 


101929 


79 


i********* 


TOTAL 


3 


$****♦♦*** 


i 


11160 


i 


644 


75 


i 165040 


51694 


36 


$«******«» 


TOTAL 


4 




95J0 


i 


8692 


i 


1961 


223 


( 120768 


58743 


62 




140951 


TOTAL 


5 


t*«* 


****** 


$ 


20340 


i 


1006 


117 


i 327162 


102470 


70 


$****«**** 


MINIMUM COSTS 




B371 


i 


57860 


i 


611 


70 


t 6228 


12072 


5 




73070 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 




1939 


t 


13407 


S 


141 


70 


(■ 1443 


12072 


5 




16931 


ACCUMULATED COSTS 




393031 


( 


221382 


s 


22948 


7169 


i 36B358 


541668 


790 




1005743 



TRAFFIC WARRENTS FJR PREMIUM PAVEMENTS REQUIRING REDUCED MAINTENANCE 
ANALYSIS YEAR: 20 DIRECTION COMBINED 



ACTIVITY 


CLOSURE 


MAINTENANCE t. 


OPERAT lUN 




ACCIDENTS 




LOSS 


TIME 


POLLUTION 




TOTAL 


NUMBER 


CATEGORY 


REHAfllL ITATIUN 




COSTS 




COSTS 


*X100 




COSTS 


HOURS 


•01 DAYS 




COSTS 


1 


I 




2 0094 


i 


272768 




3265 


383 




17113 


13471 


34 




313240 


1 


2 


$* 


******** 




25304 




1292 


152 




12055 


8888 


6 


%******#** 


1 


3 


$* 


******** 




15518 




1150 


135 




716 


882 





$****«**** 


1 


4 




24938 




21488 




6838 


8 04 




497937 


188510 


198 




551201 


1 


5 


$*«»♦»**** 




16581 




1228 


144 




765 


942 





(«*****«*^ 


2 


1 














, 





















2 


2 




































2 


3 




































2 


4 




































2 


5 




































3 


1 




1806 




54828 




22 7 


26 




890044 


259135 


223 




946905 


3 


2 




1806 




23545 




229 


26 




375670 


115887 


90 




401250 


3 


3 




1806 




9232 




214 


25 




179892 


56758 


35 




191144 


3 


4 




1806 




2720 




24t 


28 




6616 


13072 


5 




11386 


3 


5 




1806 




18464 




42 8 


50 




359784 


113516 


71 




380482 


4 


1 




■ 324 




4450 




24 


2 




368 


173 







5166 


4 


2 


$« 


******** 




111 




5 







52 


15 





$********* 


4 


3 


$********* 




62 




6 







54 


30 





{**»****** 


4 


4 




378 




148 




65 


6 




25055 


6498 


9 




25546 


4 


5 


$» 


******** 




92 




8 







80 


44 





t*******«* 


5 


1 




































5 


2 


$* 


******** 


























t********* 


5 • 


3 


$********* 


























i********* 


5 


4 






















12 










12 


5 


5 


$« 


******** 


























s********* 


o 


1 




































6 


2 




































6 


3 







i 





























5 


4 







i 







J 





















6 


S 







i 





























7 


1 







i 





























7 


2 







i 





























J 


3 







I 





























7 


4 







$ 





























7 


5 







i 





























TOTAL 


1 




^2224 


i 


332046 




3516 


411 




907525 


272779 


257 




1265311 


TOTAL 


2 


t********* 


i 


48960 




1526 


178 




387777 


125790 


96 


$****•**** 


TOTAL 


3 


$*♦******* 


i 


24812 




1370 


160 




180662 


57670 


35 


s********* 


TOTAL 


4 




27122 


i 


24356 




7147 


838 




529620 


208080 


212 




S88245 


TOTAL 


5 


$**♦♦****♦ 


i 


35137 




1664 


194 




360629 


114502 


71 


t********* 


MINIMUM COSTS 




2466 1 


s 


219191 




2077 


241 




6686 


13126 


5 




2S26IS 


DISCOUNTED 


COSTS 




5291 


i 


47027 




445 


241 




1434 


13126 


5 




54198 


ACCUMULATED 


COSTS 




398322 


i 


268409 




23393 


7410 




369792 


554794 


795 




1059941 


ACCUMULATED 


COSTS 


S 


398J22 


i 


268409 


$ 


23393 


7410 


i 


369792 


554794 


795 


t 


1059941 



180 



DOT LIBRARY 



DQ055217 



FHWA 



R&D